Scott Blackmun

USOC CEO: ‘It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation’

5 Comments

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun is waiting on clarification on Russia’s anti-gay law, like the International Olympic Committee is, but would like to see U.S. athletes comply with any laws in place.

“It’s our strong desire that our athletes comply with the laws of every nation that we visit,” Blackmun told R-Sport on Wednesday. “This law is no different.”

The Russian news agency asked Blackmun his interpretation of the law.

“We’re looking to the IOC for some leadership in this issue,” Blackmun said. “They have been in discussions with the Russian authorities, so we’re awaiting for some clarification from them.

“Our job, first and foremost, is to make sure that our athletes are prepared to compete and aren’t distracted while they’re here. We’re a sports organization, and we’ll leave the diplomacy on the legal issues to the diplomats, and we’re not going to get involved.”

Asked about involvement if an athlete makes a protest, Blackmun responded:

“You can’t judge in advance what you’re going to do. Each Games is different. The athletes are always going into countries with laws different than his or her own country. They’re going to agree with those laws in some ways, they’re going to disagree with those laws in other ways.”

On Monday, the Russian Interior Ministry said its employees will “act in the framework” of a law banning the promotion of “non-traditional sexual relations” toward minors “during the Olympics as well as during any other time.”

It also said fears of sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are “absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The Russian Interior Ministry controls the country’s police force, according to R-Sport. Here are the full comments made to Russian news agency Interfax:

“The law mentioned above has come into effect and operates in Russia.”

“Due to this, employees of the Russian Interior Ministry will act in the framework of the Russian law in general and the law protecting children from harmful information in particular during the Olympics as well as during any other time.

“This law applies to individuals “whose goal is to provoke underage persons to get involved in non-traditional sexual relations.

“Law enforcement authorities will take measures against individuals performing such actions in accordance with the Russian law.

“Law enforcement authorities can not have any questions of people of non-traditional sexual orientation not committing such actions, not holding any provocations and peacefully participating with everyone in the Olympic events.”

“Thus, fears of rights violations of representatives of non-traditional sexual orientation, preventing them from participating in the Olympics and sexually-based discrimination of Olympic athletes and guests are absolutely groundless and farfetched.”

The head of Russia’s National Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, agreed with the interior ministry’s statement, according to R-Sport.

“If a person does not put across his views in the presence of children, no measures against him can be taken,” Zhukov said Monday. “People of nontraditional sexual orientations can take part in the competitions and all other events at the Games unhindered, without any fear for their safety whatsoever.”

The IOC has said the last two weeks that it “received a number of assurances from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the Games.”

On Friday, IOC president Jacques Rogge said the Russian government gave the IOC assurances about the law Thursday but more clarifications were required. Rogge cited translation issues.

Here’s how Russian news outlet RT.com explained the law:

The legislation “prohibiting propaganda of homosexuality to minors” was enacted on June 30, when it was signed by president Putin. It’s an amendment to the law “On protecting children from information harmful to their health and development”.

If found guilty of promoting “non-traditional sexual relationships”, individuals could face fines of up to 5,000 rubles (US$150). The sum would be multiplied by 10 if those individuals appear to be civil servants. Organizations, meanwhile, would have to pay 1 million rubles (about $30,000) or have their activity suspended for 90 days if they do not comply with the fresh amendment.

Bolt photographer calls image ‘pure luck’

U.S. Open changes seeding policy for pregnancies

AP
Leave a comment

Serena Williams will learn Wednesday if she is seeded at Wimbledon, while a top U.S. Open official is already reportedly saying its seeds will be revised if a return from pregnancy comes into play, though not naming Williams specifically.

The U.S. Open, the fourth and final Grand Slam tournament of the year in September, would “revise the seedings if pregnancy is a factor in the current rankings of a player,” USTA president and chairwoman Katrina Adams said, according to The New York Times.

Williams, a 23-time Grand Slam singles champion, was not given one of 32 seeds at the French Open in May, her first Grand Slam since coming back from having daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jron Sept. 1.

Her ranking had fallen to No. 453 due to maternity leave. She could enter the major tournament due to the WTA’s protected ranking rule, but it was up to Grand Slam organizers whether to give her a seed.

Williams reached the semifinals of her last eight U.S. Opens, missing the New York event in 2010 and 2017. She has won it six times. Her current ranking is No. 183.

If Williams neither makes a deep Wimbledon run nor plays plenty of summer hard-court matches, it’s likely the U.S. Open will have to decide whether to give her a seed. It sounds like organizers are prepared to.

“It’s the right thing to do for these mothers that are coming back,” Adams said, according to the report, adding that players should not be “penalized” for starting a family.

Williams reached the fourth round of the French Open in her first Grand Slam since winning the 2017 Australian Open while pregnant (but before the world learned). She withdrew before a round of 16 showdown with Maria Sharapova due to a pectoral muscle injury and has not played in a tournament since.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Serena calls parts of Sharapova’s book ‘hearsay’

Noah Lyles takes next step to stardom as youngest U.S. 100m champion in 34 years

Leave a comment

Incredible, Noah Lyles.

Lyles, wearing red “The Incredibles” socks, won the U.S. 100m title in 9.88 seconds, the fastest time in the world this year, at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships in Des Moines on Friday night.

Lyles overtook Ronnie Baker in the final strides to win by .02 and become the youngest man to take the sprint crown since Sam Graddy in 1984. Nationals were held a week before Olympic Trials won by Carl Lewis in 1984. Essentially, Lyles is the youngest U.S. 100m champ since Lewis in 1981.

What’s more incredible is that Lyles is primarily a 200m runner, having finished fourth in that event at the 2016 Olympic Trials as an 18-year-old. Lyles is joint fastest in the world in the 200m this year and has not lost an outdoor 200m since the trials (he missed 2017 Nationals, and thus 2017 Words, with a hamstring tear).

“I wanted to prove myself as a 100m runner,” Lyles, who turned pro after Olympic Trials and skipped NCAA track, told Lewis Johnson on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA. “I’ve kind of been cheatin’ on my 200m. It’s time to go back to my baby.”

NCAA champion Aleia Hobbs won the women’s 100m in 10.91 seconds, beating Ashley Henderson by .05 and Olympian Jenna Prandini by .07.

Hobbs, 22, was seventh in her senior nationals debut last year. She entered Des Moines with the four fastest times among Americans this year, ranked No. 3 in the world behind Marie-Josée Ta Lou of Cote d’Ivoire and Nigerian Blessing Okagbare-Ighotegunor.

The U.S.’ established 100m stars — world gold and silver medalists Justin Gatlin and Christian Coleman and world champion Tori Bowie — are not racing at nationals. This is the only year in the four-year cycle without an Olympics or world outdoor championships.

USATF Outdoors continue Saturday on NBC (4-6 p.m. ET) and NBC Sports Gold (11 a.m.-6 p.m.), highlighted by 400m, 1500m and 100m hurdles finals.

USATF Outdoors: TV Schedule | Results | Women’s Preview | Men’s Preview

Earlier Friday, Olympic champion Christian Taylor fouled and passed out of the triple jump after three jumps, shortly after finishing fifth in his 400m semifinal to miss Saturday’s final by one spot.

Olympian Zach Ziemek became the first man other than Ashton Eaton and Trey Hardee to win the U.S. decathlon title since 2010. Ziemek, who finished third, third and second the last three years, scored 8,294 points to win by 275 over Solomon Simmons.

Favorites Kendall Ellis, Courtney Okolo and Shakima Wimbley advanced to Saturday’s women’s 400m final. Olympic silver medalist Allyson Felix and 2017 World champion Phyllis Francis chose not to race the 400m in Des Moines. Eighteen-year-old pro Sydney McLaughlin, fastest in the world this year in the 400m hurdles, entered the 400m but scratched before Thursday’s first round after feeling tightness in her quad in warm-up.

World bronze medalist Ajee’ Wilson and Olympic bronze medalist Clayton Murphy highlighted the qualifiers into Sunday’s 800m finals.

MORE: Lyles, Norman, green teens at Olympic Trials, now stars at USATF Champs

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!