Bernard Lagat

How will Bernard Lagat fare at World Speedgolf Championships?

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Bernard Lagat‘s season didn’t end with the Fifth Avenue Mile on Sunday.

No, the four-time Olympian has one more major international competition left — the World Speedgolf Championships.

Lagat and Fifth Avenue Mile winner Nick Willis, an Olympic silver medalist from New Zealand, are among the entrants at the Oct. 26-27 event in Bandon, Ore.

What is speedgolf?

Let speedgolfinternational.com explain:

Speedgolf is pretty much just what it sounds like; golf played at a very fast pace. Competitors play 9 or 18 holes and run between shots. Scores are calculated by adding the time taken to complete the round and the total strokes taken. For instance, if a competitor shoots a golf score of 80 and it takes 60 minutes to complete their round, their Speedgolf score (SGS) would be 140 (80 + 60).

Competitors generally carry 5-6 clubs in a small bag, wear athletic golf attire, put on their running shoes and they are ready to go.

The only real differences from traditional golf are the flagstick is left in when putting and lost balls are dropped anywhere on the line of flight of the previous shot with a one-shot penalty.

The 2012 world champion, Chris Walker, carded a 77 and a 76 in times of 53 minutes, 29 seconds and 56:59 for a total of 263:28 and an $18,000 grand prize.

Lagat doesn’t have a registered golf handicap, and his personal best is an 89 in five years of playing. Lagat will have to rely on his speed, which is, of course, world class. A course is usually about four miles long, and Lagat’s personal best in the 5,000 meters (3.12 miles) is 12:53.60.

“I’m just going to go there and enjoy it,” Lagat, 38, told Spikes magazine, adding that he’d like to see Michael Phelps give it a shot. “If I get a round of 90 and I run 40 mins I think I’ll be very competitive. The winners of these events are very good athletes, but they are also very good golfers who can hit 71 or 72 shots. To play that consistently and run that fast is unbelievable. For me, a very good day is to hit under 90.”

The world record 109:06, a round of 65 in 44:06 in 2005.

Willis, with a nine handicap, “could be a threat to win,” Speedgolf International executive director Tim Scott told the (Eugene, Ore.) Register-GuardJ.J. Killeen, who played 33 tournaments on the PGA Tour in 2012, is among the best golfers expected to compete.

This isn’t the first time a noted distance runner has ventured into speedgolf. Steve Scott, who ran a record 136 sub-4-minute miles in the 1970s and 1980s, played an 18-hole round in 29:33 in 1982, carding a 95.

Willis has said he learned about speedgolf from Scott’s Wikipedia page.

“Oxygen debt is a bit of an issue, so you have to run slightly within yourself,” Willis told Runner’s World. “The key is to be comfortable not taking long to set up your shot and swing. I have never been one to take practice swings anyway, so I haven’t had to alter my game too much.”

Ben Johnson returns to Seoul Olympic Stadium (photos)

Alysa Liu rallies to win Junior Grand Prix with another quadruple jump

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U.S. figure skating champion Alysa Liu landed a quadruple Lutz for a second straight Junior Grand Prix, rallying from fourth after the short program to win an event in Poland on Friday.

Liu, who in January became the youngest U.S. champion in history at age 13, won both of her starts in her first season on the Junior Grand Prix to become the first U.S. woman to qualify for the six-skater Junior Grand Prix Final since 2013 (Polina Edmunds and Karen Chen). The Final is held with the senior Grand Prix Final in Turin, Italy, in December.

She won Friday by 6.63 points by surpassing a pair of Russians, a rarity in this era. Her free skate is here.

Liu trailed by 4.03 points after doubling a planned triple loop in the short program. She was the lone skater in the field to attempt a triple Axel (landing three of them, including two in combination and one with a negative grade of execution) or a quad.

Liu tallied 138.99 points in the free skate and 203.10 overall. She ranks sixth in the world this season by best total scores among junior and senior skaters, though some top skaters have yet to compete.

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Rafaela Silva, first Brazilian gold medalist at Rio Olympics, claims innocence after positive drug test

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Rafaela Silva, the judoka who grew up in Rio’s most famously violent favela to become Brazil’s first gold medalist at the Rio Olympics, reportedly tested positive for a banned substance last month.

Silva tested positive for fenoterol, a substance that can be legal to treat asthma if an athlete has a therapeutic use exemption (TUE). Silva did not have a TUE before testing positive at the Pan American Games in August, according to Brazilian media.

A possible punishment has not been announced.

Silva claimed innocence at a news conference Friday afternoon, saying that a young child with whom she had bodily contact at her training location used the substance, and she plans to compete at a domestic event this weekend, according to O Globo.

Silva, 27, backed up her Rio Olympic 57kg title by taking bronze at the world championships later in August. If she is punished for the positive test, Silva could lose that bronze medal, though she said Friday that she had a clean drug test at worlds, according to O Globo.

Silva, from Rio’s Ciadade de Deus favela, has the Olympic rings tattooed on her right bicep with the inscription “God knows how much I’ve suffered and what I’ve done to get here.”

Brazil’s top female swimmer, Etiene Medeiros, reportedly tested positive for fenoterol in May 2016 but was cleared to compete at the Rio Olympics.

In PyeongChang, Slovenian hockey player Ziga Jeglic tested positive for fenoterol and was scratched before his nation’s last game before it was announced. Jeglic was suspended from the Games and, later, was suspended eight months.

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