Postcard: Munich 1972 Olympic venues; massacre site today

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MUNICH — Look directly overhead on the U-Bahn subway system, and there’s no translation necessary. The eighth stop on the U3 train is labeled Olympiazentrum, adorned by five gray interlocking rings.

Many passengers — tourists, mostly — exit the U3 at Olympiazentrum. The heart of the 1972 Olympics — including venues for track and field and swimming and the Olympic village — is about a 10-minute walk away. But directly off the escalator is just as popular of an attraction, the BMW Museum.

They are two distinct sites of German engineering, one modern and the other a relic of one of the most memorable Olympic Games. The BMW Museum is a sight to behold (and free), but walking beyond it and toward sports history was spine-tingling.

Here’s a photographic look at the 1972 Munich Olympic Village today:

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The unique architecture is the first thing that stands out on the walk from the subway.

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Runners congregate at the Olympic Park to traverse a loop around a small lake that’s maybe a couple miles. For the more daring, there’s a switchback-lined climb up to the top of this hill.

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A pass into the track and field stadium cost €3. For €71, you can zipline from one end of the roof to the top of the stands on the other side and go onto what’s left of the track.

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Every door into the press box is locked, but you can press a camera against a window to get a glimpse. It was last regularly used for Bayern Munich matches before Allianz Arena was built for the 2006 World Cup.

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As you can see, only about 100 meters of track remains. Graffiti outside the press box read: “PRE LIVES — USA” was a reference to Steve Prefontaine, the iconic American who finished fourth in the 5,000 meters and died in a car crash three years later.

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The Olympia Schwimmhalle housed Mark Spitz‘s then-record seven gold-medal performance at the 1972 Olympics. Now, it’s filled with lap swimmers.

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The Olympic athletes’ village is pretty much across the street from the Olympic Park. It’s now an apartment complex, but several reminders of its past remain. The residents are surely used to the murmur of tourists with cameras.

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Plug 31 Connollystraße into Google Maps, and this is where it leads you. This is the building where 11 Israeli athletes and coaches were taken hostage on Sept. 5, 1972. It is not possible to go upstairs and to the balcony of this haunting image without resident access.

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A memorial sits near the entrance to building 31 with 11 used candles and flowers. Residents didn’t seem to enter this way, though. There’s a garage below with an entrance that sees more traffic.

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This is not near Olympic Park but at the heart of Oktoberfest — the Theresienwiese fairgrounds. What looked like the tallest roller coaster at the carnival-type event was an homage to the Olympic Games.

Olympic flame lit in Olympia, starring Alex Ovechkin

2020 French Open women’s singles draw, results

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If Serena Williams is to win a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title at the French Open, she may have to go through her older sister in the fourth round.

Williams, the sixth seed, could play Venus Williams in the round of 16 at Roland Garros, which begins Sunday.

Serena opens against countrywoman Kristie Ahn, whom she beat in the first round at the U.S. Open. Serena could then get her U.S. Open quarterfinal opponent, fellow mom Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, in the second round.

If Venus is to reach the fourth round, she must potentially get past U.S. Open runner-up Victoria Azarenka in the second round. Azarenka beat Serena in the U.S. Open semifinals, ending the American’s latest bid to tie Margaret Court‘s major titles record.

Venus lost in the French Open first round the last two years.

The French Open top seed is 2018 champion Simona Halep, who could play 2019 semifinalist Amanda Anisimova in the third round.

Coco Gauff, the rising 16-year-old American, gets 2019 semifinalist Jo Konta of Great Britain in the first round in the same quarter of the draw as Halep.

The field lacks defending champion Ash Barty of Australia, not traveling due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Also out: U.S. Open winner Naomi Osaka, citing a sore hamstring and tight turnaround from prevailing in New York two weeks ago.

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2020 French Open men’s singles draw, results

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Rafael Nadal was put into the same half of the French Open draw as fellow 2018 and 2019 finalist Dominic Thiem of Austria, with top-ranked Novak Djokovic catching a break.

Nadal, trying to tie Roger Federer‘s male record 20 Grand Slam singles titles, could play sixth-seeded German Alexander Zverev in the quarterfinals before a potential clash with Thiem, who just won the U.S. Open.

Djokovic, who is undefeated in 2020 save being defaulted out of the U.S. Open, could play No. 7 seed Matteo Berrettini of Italy in the quarterfinals before a possible semifinal with Russian Daniil Medvedev.

Medvedev is the fourth seed but is 0-3 at the French Open. Another possible Djokovic semifinal opponent is fifth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece, who reached the fourth round last year.

The most anticipated first-round matchup is between three-time major champion Andy Murray and 2015 French Open champion Stan Wawrinka. In Murray’s most recent French Open match, he lost in five sets to Wawrinka in the 2017 semifinals.

FRENCH OPEN DRAWS: Men | Women | TV Schedule

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