Mo Farah got into a fist fight while training on Christmas

Mo Farah
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source:  British distance running superstar Mo Farah has an autobiography coming out Thursday, and interesting excerpts are being published by the Telegraph.

Of note, a Christmas morning run in 2009. Farah went to a British park to climb a hill repeatedly and spotted a couple pushing a baby in a stroller up the same hill.

They were taking up enough space that Farah was unable to run around them, he wrote.

After three or four attempts to run around the couple I got a bit fed up. “Sorry, mate,” I said. “Would you mind moving just a little bit to the side of the path so I can run past? I’m training.”

Farah, 5-foot-4 and 128 pounds according to Team GB, wrote that he asked the man to move, twice, and he refused. The situation escalated into a heated argument and then to “rolling around on the ground, trading blows.”

Police showed up.

I was caked in mud from where I’d been rolling around on the grass. There were nicks and cuts all over my face and I sported a massive bruise on my head.

The newspaper also reported Farah’s plans for 2014 (outside of a possible charity race with Usain Bolt).

Farah will make his 26.2-mile debut at the London Marathon in April. Then he wants to return to the track to compete in the two biggest meets of the outdoor season — the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland, which begin July 27 for track and field, and the European Championships in Zurich, Switzerland, which begin Aug. 12.

Farah swept the 5000m and 10,000m at the London Olympics and the World Championships in August but would likely run one event at the Commonwealth Games and the European Championships, according to the report.

Farah, like Bolt, has not won a medal at the Commonwealth Games. He finished ninth in the 5000m in 2006 and did not compete in 2010.

Bolt withdrew from the 2006 Commonwealth Games with a hamstring injury and also did not compete in 2010 but has said the 2014 Games are a possibility. He might only run the 200m though.

Farah wonders if sub-2-hour marathon is possible