Gracie Gold

Gracie Gold leads Skate Canada after short program (video)

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Gracie Gold‘s partnership with Frank Carroll paid off immediately.

Gold, 18, leads Skate Canada after beating her short program personal best by seven points in St. John, New Brunswick, on Friday afternoon. Gold scored a 69.45, topping second-place Russian Julia Lipnitskaia by nearly three points.

The reigning U.S. silver medalist hit all of her jumps — an opening triple Lutz-triple toe loop combination, triple loop and double Axel — in her first competitive skate under her new coach, the legendary Carroll.

Gold started training with Carroll in late September. The California-based Carroll, 74, also coaches 2010 Olympic champion Evan Lysacek and was the longtime coach of Michelle Kwan.

“The biggest difference (with Carroll) is the consistency in the training, which I think translates onto the ice very well,” Gold told Universal Sports. “The environment is totally different. Frank’s so experienced. He has a century of skating behind him, and you can tell. The way that he presents the information is so clear, and I think it’s made a big difference in my skating.”

Gold was in tears at practice Thursday after missing jumps, according to Universal Sports. Aggressiveness was the focus Friday.

“I was happy that I really went for everything,” Gold said. “I made them (the jumps) happen. I didn’t just let the triples happen. Often I’m a little bit tentative, especially in the short program. In practice, I had doubled some jumps in run-throughs, so we made a pact to go out there and commit myself to every element.”

Gold will look to stave off a field led by the 15-year-old Lipnitskaia in the free skate Saturday. Japan’s Akiko Suzuki is in third (65.76), followed by another American, Christina Gao, who posted a personal best 62.82. Another American, Courtney Hicks, is in last place at 50.70.

Gold, Gao and Hicks are in the running for any of the three U.S. Olympic Team spots to be named after the U.S. Championships in Boston in January. The leading woman is two-time reigning U.S. champion Ashley Wagner, who scored a 69.26 in her short program at Skate America last week, slightly less than Gold Friday.

In pairs at Skate Canada, world bronze medalists Meagan Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada took a slight lead with a 69.57 in the short program. The field is without the world gold and silver medalists. Americans Haven Denney and Brandon Frazier, the world junior champions, were fifth out of eight pairs.

Women’s Short Program
1. Gracie Gold (USA) 69.45
2. Julia Lipnitskaia (RUS) 66.89
3. Akiko Suzuki (JPN) 65.76
4. Christina Gao (USA) 62.82
5. Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN) 60.32
6. Amelie Lacoste (CAN) 59.13
7. Natalia Popova (UKR) 52.36
8. Veronik Mallet (CAN) 50.71
9. Courtney Hicks (USA) 50.70

Pairs Short Program
1. Duhamel/Radford (CAN) 69.57
2. Berton/Hotarek (ITA) 69.38
3. Sui/Han (CHN) 69.02
4. Vartmann/Van Cleave (GER) 55.08
5. Denney/Frazier (USA) 55.01
6. Lawrence/Swiegers (CAN) 52.94
7. Davis/Brubaker (USA) 52.69
8. Purdy/Marinaro (CAN) 39.50

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Allyson Felix, Noah Lyles headline Inspiration Games; TV, stream info

Allyson Felix, Noah Lyles
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In Allyson Felix‘s 17 years on the senior international level, she has never experienced anything like what Thursday will bring.

Felix, a nine-time Olympic medalist, will line up at a track in California to race 150 meters. Her opponents will be on the other side of the country — Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo in Florida — and the other side of the Atlantic Ocean — Swiss Mujinga Kambundji in Zurich.

The Inspiration Games air live on Thursday from 2-3:30 p.m. ET on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app. The meet is a repurposed version of a Diamond League stop in Zurich, Switzerland.

“I’ve just been training and training and training, so anything to break it up. … this seemed like something great. I just loved the concept,” said Felix, who memorably raced alone in at the Rio Olympics in a re-run of the 4x100m first round. “I’m not really sure what to expect. I think [it’s] the first time that we’ve all done anything like this. I’m just approaching it to have fun and hopefully give people something to watch and to be entertained by. I think we all miss sports so much.”

Meet organizers had to get creative with the coronavirus pandemic limiting athlete travel and group events. The Impossible Games was first to go on June 11, with limited athletes competing in an Oslo stadium (and others competing in different countries).

The Inspiration Games takes virtual competition to another level. Felix, Miller-Uibo and Kambundji are all slated to sprint at the same time in different locations. As are world champion Noah Lyles, Frenchman Christophe Lemaitre and the Netherlands’ Churandy Martina in a later 200m.

It marks the first meet since the coronavirus pandemic for Felix, bidding to make her fifth Olympic team and first as a mom. The pandemic and restrictions in California forced her to train on streets.

“Everything is still pretty much locked down,” she said. “You can’t get onto a track without jumping a fence.”

Lyles raced last Saturday at a small meet in Florida, outsprinting Justin Gatlin in a 100m heat (9.93 seconds to 9.99 with a hefty 4 meter/second tailwind).

The regular Diamond League calendar is scheduled to resume in August.

Here are the Inspiration Games entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

1:35 p.m. ET — Men’s Pole Vault
1:35 — Women’s Pole Vault
2:05 — Men’s Triple Jump
2:10 — Women’s 150m
2:27 — Men’s 100 Yards
2:41 — Women’s 300m Hurdles
3:06 — Men’s 200m
3:20 — Women’s 3x100m Relay

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s Pole Vault — 1:35 p.m.
Greek Katerina Stefanidi, a Stanford grad, and American Sandi Morris renew their rivalry. Stefanidi will be in California. Morris will be in Florida. Swede Angelica Bengtsson rounds out the field. Stefanidi relegated Morris to silver at the 2016 Olympics and 2017 Worlds. But Morris snapped’ Stefanidi’s streak of eight straight wins in their head-to-head back in 2018 and has bettered Stefanidi in four of their last six meetings.

Men’s Triple Jump — 2:05 p.m.
Double Olympic champion Christian Taylor takes on longtime rival Pedro Pablo Pichardo, a Cuban-born Portuguese, and American Omar Craddock. Taylor bettered Pichardo in five of their last six meetings. In more than 30 meets together, Taylor has lost to Craddock just once (when Taylor has competed in full).

Women’s 150m — 2:10 p.m.
Felix and Miller-Uibo go head to head for the first time since the 2017 World Championships. Their most memorable duel came at the Rio Olympics, where a diving Miller-Uibo edged Felix by .07 for 400m gold. While Miller-Uibo and Felix primarily compete over a full lap, the 150m is closer to Kambundji’s wheelhouse. The Swiss earned 200m bronze at the 2019 World Championships, taking advantage of a depleted field.

Men’s 100 Yards — 2:27 p.m.
Triple Olympic medalist Andre De Grasse of Canada, Olympic 110m hurdles champion Omar McLeod of Jamaica and French veteran Jimmy Vicaut all train in Florida and will presumably be racing at the same venue on Thursday. The 100 yards is scantly contested in top-level meets. Nobody has broken nine seconds in a 100-yard (91.44-meter) race, according to World Athletics. But Usain Bolt‘s estimated 100-yard time en route to his 2009 world record in the 100m was 8.87 seconds.

Men’s 200m — 3:06 p.m.
Lyles has lost an outdoor 200m just once in this Olympic cycle and wouldn’t normally be pestered by Lemaitre or Martina, but these are unusual times and this an unusual competition. Lemaitre is the Olympic bronze medalist but was sixth at last year’s French Championships. Martina, 36, and, like Lemaitre, hasn’t broken 20 seconds in more than three years.

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Usain Bolt shares first photos of baby daughter, Olympia Lightning Bolt

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Usain Bolt shared the first public photos — and the unique name — of his daughter, Olympia Lightning Bolt.

Bolt’s girlfriend, Kasi Bennett, gave birth in May.

“Now we have started a new chapter together with our daughter Olympia Lightning Bolt,” was posted on Bolt’s social media. “I look forward to what the future will bring for us but be reassured that I will be the ROCK for this family.”

Another famous Olympic champion, Serena Williams, named her daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. in 2017.

In Olympic history, one Olympian went by the name “Olympia,” according to Olympedia.org. That’s Australian rower Olympia Aldersey, who placed seventh in Rio in the eight event.

In February, Bolt said he would not encourage his child to pursue sprinting.

“That’s going to be hard for my kid,” he said during Super Bowl weekend in Miami. “If they want to do it, I’m fine with it. But initially I’m going to say don’t do it, ’cause I know the pressure that will come along with it.”

After Kobe Bryant‘s death, Bolt said he was hoping for a daughter.

“I could see in his eyes how much he loved his girls,” Bolt said. “I would love to have that feeling.”

Bolt, 33, has said he hopes to have three children.

“I’m excited, but I’m nervous,” he said. “I’ve always been a fun guy, I’ve always been that person. But should I be that person and make my girlfriend be the bad guy? Those are the questions I’m asking, so we’ll see what happens.”

Bolt, who holds world records in the 100m (9.58 seconds) and 200m (19.19), retired after the 2017 World Championships. The Tokyo Olympics in 2021 will be the first Games without the Jamaican legend since the 2000 Sydney Games.

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