Patrick Chan’s mom ‘coping with the separation’ from figure skating champion

Patrick Chan
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Not everybody in Patrick Chan‘s camp was on board with his move from Colorado Springs, Colo., to the Detroit area earlier this year.

Namely, his mother, Karen.

While Chan was winning his fourth Skate Canada title (video here), his mom was in Europe and apparently not following the action from afar.

She sent Chan an email late Saturday night wishing him good luck. Chan’s response?

“I already skated,” according to Canadian reports. Chan had won a few hours earlier.

Chan’s mother was for a long time heavily involved in his skating — his manager, chauffeur and cook, among other responsibilities, according to the Canadian Press. They lived in a hotel together when he trained in Florida and moved to Colorado together before the 2010 Olympics.

The three-time reigning world champion said his mother’s trip to Europe was her way of “coping with the separation” after he left her in Colorado to live alone in a Detroit area apartment.

“It was a transition from locations and also a transition in my life,” Chan said, according to the Toronto Star. “I’d turned 22. This was time for me to take ownership. It’s a step I had to take to prepare for the Olympics.

“It was really hard for her. If it was her choice, she would definitely want to live with me. I had to draw the line.”

He also drew a line after winning his third straight World Championship in March. Chan had asked his mom if he could get a car after his first two World Championships and was denied both times. After No. 3, he went out and bought a used 2011 charcoal BMW on his own.

In Detroit, Chan now cooks his own meals — quinoa, wild race and gluten-free pasta among them — and does his own car repairs.

“I have to look after the bills,” he said, according to the Star. “I have to make sure my accounts have money and I can write checks. That’s stuff my mom did my whole life. Having those tools, outside of skating, is going to take me a long way, I think, in the Olympic Village.

“In Vancouver, I was very lost. I needed someone to guide me, whereas now I can go into the village, be comfortable, know that, yes, I should eat this, no, I shouldn’t eat that, or I feel the need to go to the gym or do some recovery. I’m in control of everything.”

Chan’s father, Lewis, a lawyer, was at Skate Canada.

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