Paolo Bernardi

U.S. women’s ski jumping coach Paolo Bernardi quits

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Paolo Bernardi quit three months before he would become the first U.S. Olympic women’s ski jumping team coach.

The Italian Bernardi, 41, had coached the U.S. team since 2011, the same year women’s ski jumping was officially added to the Olympics after a long fight to join men at the Winter Games.

A message was posted to Bernardi’s Facebook account last week, then deleted.

“I resign for personal reasons and it was a hard decision….I keep loving and following this sport and I hope to find another team soon that can give me the motivation to start again,” was posted, according to the International Ski Federation website.

Bernardi, whose family lives in Italy, “was forced to re-evaluate his situation” after he requested an international-based assistant and was not granted one, according to USA Todaywhich also cited “demanding travel” and “an all-consuming job.”

“It was the best decision for myself and for my team because our roads were not going the same direction anymore,” Bernardi told the newspaper. “After 2 ½ years eventually we are not on the same page anymore, and so I had to quit.”

He went through a tough season with the death of his mother in February.

“I did too much,” Bernardi told the newspaper. “When you drive one car at the highest speed possible for 2 ½ years, sooner or later you’re going to hit the wall and I’m really afraid I’m going to hit the wall. Before it’s too late I want to take a break and slow down.”

Bernardi helped guide the team’s star, Sarah Hendrickson, 19, to the 2011-12 World Cup season title and the 2013 World Championship.

Hendrickson tore the ACL, MCL and meniscus in her right knee in an Aug. 21 crash but was walking normally two months later. She’s hoping to be ready to compete in Sochi on Feb. 11.

“She was looking forward to starting again with me,” Bernardi told USA Today. “We’ll see, I’m always available for her if I don’t find another job.

“She’s the kind of athlete who knows exactly what she has to do. When she gets back in January she’s going to be like before. I don’t see any problem.”

The ski jumping World Cup begins in Lillehammer, Norway, on Dec. 7.

Bernardi was known for wearing his emotions on his jacket sleeve.

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Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”