Rowdy Gaines reflects on his Auburn-Alabama reaction (video)

Rowdy Gaines
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NBC Olympics swimming analyst Rowdy Gaines earned plenty of attention for his wild Iron Bowl finish reaction on Saturday night, but he might get a little heat from his fellow Auburn alums now.

First, Gaines’ recollection of that crazy Tigers victory. His wife, Judy, was filming Gaines watching Alabama kicker Adam Griffith line up to attempt a hail-mary, 57-yard, time-expiring, game-winning field goal.

Gaines didn’t notice her though. He was glued to the TV and growing with excitement as the kick fell short and Chris Davis returned it 109 yards for a touchdown.

He compared his call Saturday to when he commentated the 2008 Olympics 4x100m freestyle relay final. In that Beijing race, Jason Lezak stormed from behind over the final 50 meters to pass France’s Alain Bernard and win gold.

“I think that one [the Iron Bowl] reached a different level than I’ve ever had in my life, although the Lezak anchor on that relay back in 2008 might have been as high,” Gaines said on “SportsDash.” “But that one was pretty exciting, I have to admit.”

Gaines said he didn’t recognize the man in his wife’s phone video when he watched it for the first time.

“Who is this goofy dude yelling and screaming?” he said.

His wife stopped filming shortly before Gaines noticed what was going on.

“I said, ‘Why did you cut it off?’ because I kept going nuts for a little bit,” he said. “In fact, I attacked my wife. … As soon as I saw that she was filming, I just kind of dove right on top of her. It was really pretty funny, and I’m kind of glad she didn’t [film] that part.”

Here’s where Gaines may differ from Auburn nation. He told SportsDash he believes undefeated Ohio State deserves to go to the BCS Championship Game, which would keep Auburn out.

Gaines, though, brought up the 2004 Auburn team that went undefeated and was left out of the national championship game between two other unbeatens — USC and Oklahoma.

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