U.S. edges Europe in tiebreak relay to win Duel in the Pool (video)

Tom Shields
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The U.S. remained unbeaten in the Duel in the Pool — barely.

Down 68-54 after Friday, the Americans rallied to win the Ryder Cup-style swimming event 132-131 following a tiebreaking mixed relay when the teams were even after 30 scheduled races in Glasgow, Scotland, on Saturday.

NBC will televise the Duel in the Pool on Sunday from 4-6 p.m. ET.

The U.S. has won all six duels, including a 181.5-80.5 whipping of a European all-star team at the last edition in 2011 in Atlanta. The first three duels were U.S.-Australia battles during the heyday of their rivalry in 2003, 2005 and 2007.

This matchup was expected to be the closest yet, given the U.S. was missing Michael PhelpsRyan Lochte and Missy Franklin and its star, Katie Ledecky, was feeling under the weather and managed one podium finish, second place in the 200m freestyle Saturday.

“I didn’t have the best meet,” a hoarse Ledecky said, according to Swimming World. “But it sure as heck will be one that I’ll remember for the rest of my life.”

Europe led by as much as 86-63 after 17 of 30 races in the short-course meet. The pool was 25 meters long, as opposed to Olympic-size 50-meter pools.

Points were awarded for first, second and third place in individual events (five for first, three for second, one for third). Seven points were given in winner-take-all relays.

The U.S. stormed back with five straight individual wins but never led, forcing a 131-131 tie after the final men’s 4x100m freestyle relay anchored by Cullen Jones.

“It was intense,” two-time U.S. Olympian Anthony Ervin said, according to Swimming World“I heard mutterings about that we had to win the last relay in order to go to the tiebreaker relay. Personal efforts aside, we dug deep like we did the whole day as a team.”

So, the teams came back out for a mixed 4x50m medley relay. The U.S. led after each split with anchor Simone Manuel touching .20 of a second ahead of Great Britain’s Francesca Halsall to set off “U-S-A” chants.

A 2015 Duel in the Pool announcement has not been made, but it is expected to be staged in the U.S.

Women’s 800m Freestyle — Europe 77, U.S. 54
1. Mireia Belmonte Garcia (EUR) 8:07.90
2. Lotte Friis (EUR) 8:10.40
3. Jazmin Carlin (EUR) 8:12.01

Men’s 800m Freestyle — Europe 80, U.S. 60
1. Michael McBroom (USA) 7:33.99
2. Pal Joensen (EUR) 7:39.69
3. Michael Klueh (USA) 7:41.96

Women’s 200m Freestyle — Europe 86, U.S. 63
1. Michelle Coleman (EUR) 1:53.63
2. Katie Ledecky (USA) 1:53.83
3. Melani Costa (EUR) 1:53.96

Men’s 200m Freestyle — Europe 87, U.S. 71
1. Conor Dwyer (USA) 1:41.68
2. Tyler Clary (USA) 1:43.84
3. Robbie Renwick (EUR) 1:44.44

Women’s 100m Backstroke — Europe 91, U.S. 76
1. Olivia Smoliga (USA) 57.06
2. Simona Baumrtova (EUR) 57.11
3. Daryna Zavina (EUR) 57.16

Men’s 100m Backstroke — Europe 92, U.S. 84
1. Eugene Godsoe (USA) 50.08
2. Tom Shields (USA) 50.18
3. Chris Walker-Hebborn (EUR) 50.55

Women’s 100m Breaststroke — Europe 93, U.S. 92
1. Jessica Hardy (USA) 1:04.65
2. Micah Lawrence (USA) 1:05.27
3. Sophie Allen (EUR) 1:05.39

Men’s 100m Breaststroke — Europe 97, U.S. 97
1. Kevin Cordes (USA) 56.88
2. Marco Koch (EUR) 57.05
3. Damir Dugonjic (EUR) 57.08

Women’s 200m Butterfly — Europe 103, U.S. 100
1. Mireia Belmonte Garcia (EUR) 2:03.31
2. Cammile Adams (USA) 2:04.61
3. Franziska Hentke (EUR) 2:05.83

Men’s 200m Butterfly — Europe 107, U.S. 105
1. Tom Shields (USA) 1:50.61
2. Velimir Stjepanovic (EUR) 1:52.06
3. Roberto Pavoni (EUR) 1:52.87

Women’s 50m Freestyle — Europe 115, U.S. 106
1. Francesca Halsall (EUR) 23.93
2. Jeanette Ottesen Gray (EUR) 24.02
3. Simone Manuel (USA) 24.40

Men’s 50m Freestyle — Europe 115, U.S. 115
1. Jimmy Feigen (USA) 21.20
2. Cullen Jones (USA) 21.27
2. Anthony Ervin (USA) 21.27

Womens’ 200m Individual Medley — Europe 121, U.S. 118
1. Sophie Allen (EUR) 2:05.90
2. Caitlin Leverenz (USA) 2:06.77
3. Hannah Miley (EUR) 2:08.55

Men’s 200m Individual Medley — Europe 124, U.S. 124
1. Conor Dwyer (USA) 1:53.51
2. Roberto Pavoni (EUR) 1:54.20
3. Chase Kalisz (USA) 1:54.26

Women’s 400m Freestyle Relay — Europe 131, U.S. 124
1. Europe 3:27.70
2. U.S. 3:28.96

Men’s 400m Freestyle Relay — Europe, 131, U.S. 131
1. U.S. 3:06.66
2. Europe 3:07.95

Mixed 4x50m Medley Relay — U.S. 132, Europe 131
1. U.S. 1:37.17
2. Europe 1:37.37

Video: U.S., Canada in women’s hockey brawl

Ironman Kona World Championships return for first time in three years, live on Peacock

Ironman Kona World Championship
Ironman
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The Ironman Kona World Championships return after a three-year hiatus with a new format, live on Peacock on Thursday and Saturday at 12 p.m. ET.

The Ironman, held annually in Hawaii since 1978, and in Kailua-Kona since 1981, was not held in 2020 or 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The world championships made a one-time-only stop in St. George, Utah, on May 7 to make up for the 2021 cancellation. The winners were Norway’s Kristian Blummenfelt, the Tokyo Olympic triathlon champion, and Swiss Daniela Ryf, who bagged her fifth Ironman world title.

Both are entered in Kailua-Kona, where the races are now split between two days — Thursday for the women and Saturday for the men.

An Ironman includes a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and a marathon — totaling 140.6 miles of racing. It takes top triathletes eight hours to complete. Very arguably, it crowns the world’s fittest man and woman.

WATCH LIVE: Ironman Kona, Thursday, 12 p.m. ET — STREAM LINK

Ryf, 35 and a 2008 and 2012 Olympian, can tie retired countrywoman Natascha Badmann for second place on the women’s list at six Ironman world titles. Only Zimbabwean-turned-American Paula Newby-Fraser has more with eight.

The field also includes German Anne Haug, the 2019 Kona champ and only woman other than Ryf to win since 2015. Brit Lucy Charles-Barclay, the Kona runner-up in 2017, 2018 and 2019, returns after missing the St. George event due to a stress fracture in her hip.

Blummenfelt, 28 and in his Kona debut, will try to become the youngest male champion in Kona since German Normann Stadler in 2005. His top challengers include countryman Gustav Iden, the two-time reigning Half Ironman world champion, and German Patrick Lange, the 2017 and 2018 Ironman Kona winner.

Also racing Saturday is Dallas Clark, a retired All-Pro NFL tight end with the Indianapolis Colts, and Tony Kanaan, the 2013 Indy 500 champion who completed the 2011 Kona Ironman in 12 hours, 52 minutes, 40 seconds.

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Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champ in 1984, runs London Marathon at 65

Joan Benoit Samuelson
Getty
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Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion in 1984, ran her first 26.2-mile race in three years at Sunday’s London Marathon and won her age group.

Benoit Samuelson, 65, clocked 3 hours, 20 minutes, 20 seconds to top the women’s 65-69 age group by 7 minutes, 52 seconds. She took pleasure in being joined in the race by daughter Abby, who crossed in 2:58:19.

“She may have beaten me with my replacement knee, but everybody said I wouldn’t do it! I will never say never,” Benoit Samuelson said, according to race organizers. “I am a grandmother now to Charlotte, and it’s my goal to run 5K with her.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Benoit Samuelson raced the 1987 Boston Marathon while three months pregnant with Abby. Before that, she won the first Olympic women’s marathon at the 1984 Los Angeles Games, plus the Boston Marathon in 1979 and 1983 and the Chicago Marathon in 1985.

Her personal best — 2:21:21 — still holds up. She ranks sixth in U.S. women’s history.

Benoit Samuelson plans to race the Tokyo Marathon to complete her set of doing all six annual World Marathon Majors. The others are Berlin, Boston, Chicago and New York City.

“I’m happy to finish this race and make it to Tokyo, but I did it today on a wing and a prayer,” she said, according to organizers. “I’m blessed to have longevity in this sport. It doesn’t owe me anything, but I feel I owe my sport.”

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