Nancy Kerrigan

Nancy Kerrigan joins NBC Olympics for Sochi; notes from media event

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Two-time Olympic figure skating medalist Nancy Kerrigan will work for NBC Olympics in Sochi.

Kerrigan, the 1992 bronze medalist and 1994 silver medalist, will serve as a figure skating analyst and appear on NBC Universal shows such as TODAY, Access Hollywood and the E! network.

Kerrigan covered the 2010 Olympics for “Entertainment Tonight.”

It was previously announced that Kerrigan would be part of an NBC documentary aired during the Sochi Olympics about the attack on her plotted by Tonya Harding‘s ex-husband.

Mary Carillo interviewed both Kerrigan and Harding for the documentary.

“It took years to convince Nancy,” Carillo said at an NBC Olympics media event Tuesday.

While Harding stayed in the spotlight as much as she could after 1994, Kerrigan has largely remained a private person.

“It’s not something you celebrate, being attacked, you know,” Kerrigan said at the media event. “I was nervous to know how things would get twisted and turned because that’s happened before.”

Why did she relent now?

“I trust Mary and producer Margaret [Grossi] to really just tell the story from my perspective,” Kerrigan said. “Instead of just assuming what my perspective would be.”

Other notes from the media event:

* The Opening Ceremony will not be streamed live but will be presented in primetime on Feb. 7 from 7:30-11:30 p.m. Matt Lauer and Meredith Vieira will host with Bob Costas opening the program and New Yorker editor David Remnick, a Russia expert, serving as a correspondent.

“It’s a ceremony, it’s a pageant, it’s a theater show,” NBC Sports Group chairman Mark Lazarus said. “It is not a competition. As such, we think putting Matt and Meredith there and putting the context to it, being able to explain the history and tradition and culture that’s going to be a part of it is a better viewing experience. We’re looking to maximize the overall experience for our audience.”

All competition will be streamed live. It has not been determined if the Closing Ceremony will be streamed live.

*NBC would welcome Lindsey Vonn having a role in coverage after she announced Tuesday that she would not compete in Sochi due to her knee injury.

*Previews of NBC athlete features were shown on Russian ballet and Canadian Olympic moguls champion Alexandre Bilodeau and his older brother, Frederic, who has cerebral palsy. In 2010, Bilodeau became the first Canadian to win Olympic gold on home soil.

Kerrigan, Harding back in news on attack anniversary

Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”