Viktor Tikhonov

1980 Soviet hockey coach’s grandson on Russia Olympic Team

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The Miracle on Ice will probably be mentioned once or twice when the U.S. men’s hockey team plays Russia on Feb. 15.

Both sides in Sochi have ties to the famed 1980 Olympics game.

The U.S. roster includes defenseman Ryan Suter, son of Bob Suter, who played for the U.S. Olympic Team in 1980. The Suter story has been told often, as Ryan also played on the 2010 Olympic Team.

The Russia roster released two weeks ago included forward Viktor Tikhonov, a first-time Olympian. Tikhonov, 25, shares his name with the coach of the 1980 Soviet Union Olympic Team, who is his grandfather.

The older Tikhonov, once a Central Red Army colonel, was known as an iron-fisted coach for the 1980, ’84, ’88 and ’92 Olympic Teams. He has been called the Tolstoy of Soviet hockey. It appears he hasn’t changed at age 83.

“Of course my grandfather congratulated me when I told him I was on the team,” Tikhonov told the Moscow Times. “He was very proud to hear the news but first asked me why my club team had lost its last game.”

Tikhonov has never played at a World Championships — injury reportedly kept him out the last two times — and has a chunk of one season of NHL experience. Now with SKA St. Petersburg in the KHL, he was chosen for the Russian team over the likes of seasoned NHL forward Alexander Semin.

The Moscow Times interviewed a hockey analyst from a Russian sports daily who said Tikhonov was not selected for the Olympics because of his family ties, that he had earned it.

Tikhonov is far different from his grandfather. He has a California accent and surfer hair and visited Russia for the first time at age 15 with an American passport.

“I received my Russian passport when I was 16 or 17,” Tikhonov told the newspaper. “I am Russian by blood and I cannot imagine playing for another national team. But I still spend time in the U.S. in the summer. I guess I am a Russian-American mix.”

The Globe and Mail recalled an interesting story when a young Tikhonov did go to Moscow and worked out at the Central Red Army headquarters.

“Every day, I’d go over to eat with my grandparents and the last day he came with me and said, ‘I’m just going to watch you work out and see what you’re doing and maybe give you a few pointers.’ So I went in, spent half an hour working out and then he stopped me and said: ‘Turn the music off. You’re not going to do this again. Forget this.’

“Then he took me through a workout that was probably 20 or 30 minutes – the time flew by – little weights, lots of jumping, all legs. I couldn’t walk for two days. He said, ‘This is 30 or 40 per cent of what you should be doing every day.’ I said, ‘Oh, my God.’ “

His father, Vasily, coached in various roles for the San Jose Sharks organization from 1993 to 1999 and died in August, falling from a fourth-floor apartment window.

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2020 French Open women’s singles draw, bracket

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If Serena Williams is to win a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title at the French Open, she may have to go through her older sister in the fourth round.

Williams, the sixth seed, could play Venus Williams in the round of 16 at Roland Garros, which begins Sunday.

Serena opens against countrywoman Kristie Ahn, whom she beat in the first round at the U.S. Open. Serena could then get her U.S. Open quarterfinal opponent, fellow mom Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, in the second round.

If Venus is to reach the fourth round, she must potentially get past U.S. Open runner-up Victoria Azarenka in the second round. Azarenka beat Serena in the U.S. Open semifinals, ending the American’s latest bid to tie Margaret Court‘s major titles record.

Venus lost in the French Open first round the last two years.

The French Open top seed is 2018 champion Simona Halep, who could play 2019 semifinalist Amanda Anisimova in the third round.

Coco Gauff, the rising 16-year-old American, gets 2019 semifinalist Jo Konta of Great Britain in the first round in the same quarter of the draw as Halep.

The field lacks defending champion Ash Barty of Australia, not traveling due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Also out: U.S. Open winner Naomi Osaka, citing a sore hamstring and tight turnaround from prevailing in New York two weeks ago.

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2020 French Open men’s singles draw, bracket

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Rafael Nadal was put into the same half of the French Open draw as fellow 2018 and 2019 finalist Dominic Thiem of Austria, with top-ranked Novak Djokovic catching a break.

Nadal, trying to tie Roger Federer‘s male record 20 Grand Slam singles titles, could play sixth-seeded German Alexander Zverev in the quarterfinals before a potential clash with Thiem, who just won the U.S. Open.

Djokovic, who is undefeated in 2020 save being defaulted out of the U.S. Open, could play No. 7 seed Matteo Berrettini of Italy in the quarterfinals before a possible semifinal with Russian Daniil Medvedev.

Medvedev is the fourth seed but is 0-3 at the French Open. Another possible Djokovic semifinal opponent is fifth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece, who reached the fourth round last year.

The most anticipated first-round matchup is between three-time major champion Andy Murray and 2015 French Open champion Stan Wawrinka. In Murray’s most recent French Open match, he lost in five sets to Wawrinka in the 2017 semifinals.

FRENCH OPEN DRAWS: Men | Women | TV Schedule

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