Olympian Bracket

The ultimate Olympic NCAA Tournament bracket

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Here’s a little bit of Olympian March Madness for you.

All 68 NCAA Tournament schools can say they’ve had an Olympian student. Some, such as Stanford and Florida, have had much more than others, such as Stephen F. Austin and Delaware.

Here’s how the bracket would look if each school was represented by its best Olympian:

(Click to enlarge image)

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Preference was given to individual sports athletes in most cases to keep from the bracket being dominated by basketball and baseball players.

Tiring research led to find at least two schools with one Olympian — Stephen F. Austin had Kylie Louw, a 2012 South African soccer player, and Delaware had Kimmie Meissner, a 2006 U.S. figure skater. It’s very possible that, in the 118 years of modern Games, other Olympians attended those institutions that we simply missed.

Creighton’s Olympian, Scott Servais, was a baseball player at Seoul 1988 when it was a demonstration sport.

There’s also the debate over Michael Phelps, who attended classes but did not pursue a degree from Michigan while his coach, Bob Bowman, worked there. He also never competed for the school, having already turned pro. Other athletes were chosen with similar circumstances.

Here were some of the tough choices:

Florida — Ryan Lochte over fellow swimmer Dara Torres.
Arizona — Amanda Beard over fellow swimmer Amy Van Dyken.
Duke — Nancy Hogshead over Japanese equestrian rider Hiroshi Hoketsu, 72, who competed in the 1964, 2008 and 2012 Olympics.
Michigan State — Ryan Miller over Magic Johnson.
Cincinnati — Oscar Robertson over 2008 Olympic 110m hurdles silver medalist David Payne.
North Carolina — Michael Jordan over soccer star Mia Hamm and hurdler Allen Johnson.
Oregon — Ashton Eaton over immensely popular 1970s distance runner Steve Prefontaine, who finished fourth in his only Olympic race.
Nebraska — Rulon Gardner over fellow wrestler Jordan Burroughs.
Eric Heiden — He went to Wisconsin and Stanford, but was slotted as a Badger to keep two-time Olympic decathlon champion Bob Mathias in for the Cardinal.

Here’s the complete list of Olympians, region by region:

SOUTH
1. Florida — Ryan Lochte, Swimming
2. Kansas — Al Oerter, Track and Field
3. Syracuse — Meyer Prinstein, Track and Field
4. UCLA — Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Track and Field
5. Virginia Commonwealth — Yann Bonato, Basketball
6. Ohio State — Jesse Owens, Track and Field
7. New Mexico — Luc Longley, Basketball
8. Colorado — Bill Toomey, Track and Field
9. Pittsburgh — Roger Kingdom, Track and Field
10. Stanford — Bob Mathias, Track and Field
11. Dayton — Mike Sylvester, Basketball
12. Stephen F. Austin — Kylie Louw, Soccer
13. Tulsa — Todd Hays, Bobsled
14. Western Michigan — Bill Porter, Track and Field
15. Eastern Kentucky — Jackie Humphrey, Track and Field
16. Albany — Shawn Sheldon, Wrestling
16. Mount Saint Mary’s — Peter Rono, Track and Field

WEST
1. Arizona — Amanda Beard, Swimming
2. Wisconsin — Eric Heiden, Speed Skating
3. Creighton — Scott Servais, Baseball
4. San Diego State — Chris Marlowe, Volleyball
5. Oklahoma — Bart Conner, Gymnastics
6. Baylor — Michael Johnson, Track and Field
7. Oregon — Ashton Eaton, Track and Field
8. Gonzaga — John Stockton, Basketball
9. Oklahoma State — John Smith, Wrestling
10. Brigham Young — Frankie Fredericks, Track and Field
11. Nebraska — Rulon Gardner, Wrestling
12. North Dakota State — Amanda Smock, Track and Field
13. New Mexico State — Chito Reyes, Basketball
14. Louisiana-Lafayette — Hollis Conway, Track and Field
15. American — Sergio Lopez Miro, Swimming
16. Weber State — Bill Schuffenhauer, Bobsled

EAST
1. Virginia — Dawn Staley, Basketball
2. Villanova — Don Bragg, Track and Field
3. Iowa State — Dan Gable, Wrestling
4. Michigan State — Ryan Miller, Hockey
5. Cincinnati — Oscar Robertson, Basketball
6. North Carolina — Michael Jordan, Basketball
7. Connecticut — Diana Taurasi, Basketball
8. Memphis — Penny Hardaway, Basketball
9. George Washington — Elana Meyers, Bobsled
10. St. Joseph’s — Mike Teti, Rowing
11. Providence — Cammi Granato, Hockey
12. Harvard — Dick Button, Figure Skating
13. Delaware — Kimmie Meissner, Figure Skating
14. North Carolina Central — Lee Calhoun, Track and Field
15. Wisconsin-Milwaukee — Mitchell Whitmore, Speed Skating
16. Coastal Carolina — Amber Campbell, Track and Field

MIDWEST
1. Wichita State — Braden Looper, Baseball
2. Michigan — Michael Phelps, Swimming
3. Duke — Nancy Hogshead, Swimming
4. Louisville — Angel McCoughtry, Basketball
5. St. Louis — Dick Boushka, Basketball
6. Massachusetts — Briana Scurry, Soccer
7. Texas — Mary Lou Retton, Texas
8. Kentucky — Alex Groza, Basketball
9. Kansas State — Thane Baker, Track and Field
10. Arizona State — Amanda Borden, Gymnastics
11. Iowa — Tom Brands, Wrestling
11. Tennessee — Justin Gatlin, Track and Field
12. North Carolina State — Joan Benoit, Track and Field
12. Xavier — Jason Parker, Shooting
13. Manhattan — Lindy Remigino, Track and Field
14. Mercer — Cindy Brogdon, Basketball
15. Wofford — Mike Lenzly, Basketball
16. Cal Poly — Stephanie Brown Trafton, Track and Field
16. Texas Southern — Jim Hines, Track and Field

Socal media statistics from Sochi 2014

Tadej Pogacar stuns Primoz Roglic, set to win Tour de France

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Tadej Pogacar overtook countryman Primoz Roglic and is set to become the youngest Tour de France champion since 1904, the second-youngest in history and the first Slovenian champion.

Pogacar, who turns 22 on Monday, overcame a 57-second deficit to Roglic and won Saturday’s penultimate stage, a 22-mile time trial with a finishing four-mile climb. He is 59 seconds ahead of Roglic after three weeks and 84 hours of total racing.

“Actually, my dream was just to be [in] the Tour de France,” Pogacar said. “I cannot believe it, and if you ask me in one week, one month, I will still not believe it, probably.”

Pogacar won the stage by 81 seconds, greater than the margin separating second place from eighth place after 55 minutes on the roads. Roglic was fifth.

It’s reminiscent of American Greg LeMond surpassing Frenchman Laurent Fignon in the time trial finale of the 1989 Tour.

That final margin was the closest in Tour history — eight seconds. This one would be the 11th time in Tour history that the difference is less than a minute, according to ProCyclingStats.com.

“I struggled with everything, just not enough power,” Roglic said. “I was just more and more without the power that I obviously needed. I was just really giving everything till the end.”

Australian Richie Porte will join Pogacar and Roglic on the podium after moving up from fourth place going into the time trial. Colombian Miguel Angel Lopez, who came into the day in third, dropped to sixth.

It’s the first time since 2007 that everybody on the final Tour de France podium will be there for the first time.

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Sunday’s finale is the traditional ceremonial ride into Paris where the overall leaders don’t attack each other.

Pogacar is riding his first Tour de France and in his second season as a professional cyclist with a World Tour team.

Last September, he finished third in the Vuelta a Espana, one of three Grand Tours, which Roglic won. At the time, Pogacar became the youngest Grand Tour podium finisher since 1974.

“I knew that I can be with the best, that I can follow,” after the Vuelta, Pogacar said, “but I never thought that I would win already this year, especially in this season that was really strange.”

UAE Team Emirates initially planned to use Pogacar to support Fabio Aru, but the Slovenian’s continued emergence changed the plan.

“I’m going [to the Tour] firstly to learn,” Pogacar said in May. “But if I have a chance to show what I can do, I will.”

Pogacar was Robin to Roglic’s Batman for most of this Tour.

Roglic wore the yellow jersey as race leader the last two weeks. heading the dominant Jumbo-Visma team. Pogacar donned the white jersey for the highest-placed rider 25 and under, though he was on a weaker team.

But when they went head-to-head on climbs, Pogacar usually stuck with Roglic, sometimes riding away from him.

When it came down to the final climb on Saturday, with no team support in what they call the race of truth, Pogacar showed who was the strongest Slovenian.

“[Roglic] was really superior through the whole Tour,” Pogacar said. “He must be devastated, but that’s bike racing, I guess. Today I beat him, and that was it.”

MORE: USA Cycling names Olympic team finalists

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2020 Tour de France standings

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2020 Tour de France standings for the yellow jersey, green jersey, white jersey and polka-dot jersey through stage 20 of 21 …

Overall (Yellow Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — +:59
3. Richie Porte (AUS) — +3:30
4. Mikel Landa (ESP) — +5:58
5. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
6. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — +6:47
7. Tom Dumoulin (NED) — +7:48
8. Rigberto Uran (COL) — +8:02
9. Adam Yates (GBR) — +9:25
10. Damiano Caruso (ITA) — +14:03
13. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — +24:44
15. Sepp Kuss (USA) — +42:20
17. Nairo Quintana (COL) — +1:02:46
29. Thibaut Pinot (FRA) — +1:59:33
36. Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) — +2:17:41
DNF. Egan Bernal (COL)

Sprinters (Green Jersey)
1. Sam Bennett (IRL) — 319 points
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — 264
3. Matteo Trentin (ITA) — 250
4. Bryan Coquard (FRA) — 173
5. Caleb Ewan (AUS) — 158

Climbers (Polka-Dot Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 82 points
2. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — 74
3. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — 67
4. Marc Hirschi (SUI) — 62
5. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — 51

Young Rider (White Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
3. Valentin Madouas (FRA) — +1:42:22
4. Dani Martinez (COL) — +1:54:51
5. Lennard Kamna (GER) — +2:14:33

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