Steven Holcomb competed at Olympics with torn Achilles

Steve Holcomb
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That calf strain that Steven Holcomb fought through to win two bronze medals in Sochi was actually a torn Achilles, according to the bobsledder’s social media.

Before the diagnosis, Holcomb said his two- and four-man bobsled teams could have won two silver medals in Sochi if not for his injury.

“Unfortunately, my calf injury held us back,” Holcomb said at the Best of U.S. Awards in Washington last week. “These guys [teammates] rose to the occasion. I couldn’t push quite as hard as I wanted to.”

Holcomb said gold medals, even if healthy, were out of reach because of Russian Aleksandr Zubkov‘s experience on his home-nation track. Zubkov’s sled set track records in winning both the two- and four-man competitions.

Holcomb and his four-man teammates Chris FogtSteven Langton and Curt Tomasevicz haven’t seen too much of each other since Sochi after essentially living together in the previous six months.

Holcomb said he will continue his break until May or June. Tomasevicz, 33 and the only push athlete on both the 2010 and 2014 sleds, has retired.

“There’s going to be 100 second thoughts,” Tomasevicz said last week. “Come September, October, it’s going to be tough sitting around, watching, and not being a part of it. Hopefully, I’ll find something else to occupy my focus.”

The Army Capt. Fogt will go back on active duty in May, heading to Fort Huachuca in Arizona. He expects to spend six months there and then around a year and a half “wherever the Army sends me.” He speculated Germany, Korea or Georgia.

“I’m very, very excited,” said Fogt, who hopes to return to bobsledding before the 2018 Olympics. “After the last [Olympics], I went to Iraq for a year. That was my first love. I joined the Army in 2005 and started bobsledding in 2007. It’s been a great experience. I’m very much looking forward to the opportunity of being a regular Joe and working with soldiers again.”

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