Johan Bruyneel

Lance Armstrong’s longtime team manager banned 10 years

6 Comments

Johan Bruyneel, the man at the helm of Lance Armstrong‘s cycling teams for all seven of his stripped Tour de France titles, was banned 10 years for involvement in “doping conspiracy,” the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said Tuesday.

The Belgian Bruyneel “was at the apex of a conspiracy to commit widespread doping on the USPS and Discovery Channel teams spanning many years and many riders,” a three-member, independent arbitration panel concluded.

A team trainer and team doctor from Armstrong and Bruyneel’s U.S. Postal Service teams were also banned, for eight years. Armstrong has already been banned for life.

“From the beginning, our investigation has focused on ridding cycling of those entrusted to care for the well-being of athletes who abuse their position of trust and influence to assist or encourage the use of performance-enhancing drugs to defraud sport and clean athletes,” USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a press release. “There is no excuse for any team director, doctor or other athlete support person who corrupts the very sport and the athletes they are supposed to protect.”

Bruyneel encouraged athletes to use performance-enhancing products such as EPO, blood transfusions, testosterone and cortisone, the panel said.

The Panel found that Bruyneel trafficked in performance-enhancing drugs and “was engaged in the allocation of team-related resources… causing a variety of prohibited doping substances and methods to be used expressly for the purpose of gaining an unfair advantage for the teams and cyclists he managed in cycling events.” In addition, the Panel found that Bruyneel himself “profited considerably from the successes of the teams and riders he managed during the relevant period.”

Bruyneel refused to testify at his four-day hearing in London in December 2013, when 17 witness, including eight cyclists, did testify. Bruyneel presented no fact witnesses on his own behalf, USADA said. His ban runs through June 11, 2022.

Bruyneel said on his website he is debating his next step, perhaps appealing to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

“I do not dispute that there are certain elements of my career that I wish had been different,” a blog post read. “Nor do I dispute that doping was a fact of life in the peloton for a considerable period of time. However, a very small minority of us has been used as scapegoats for an entire generation.”

Bruyneel said he may decide to “try to expose the hypocrisy of what USADA has put me and others through.”

“In due course, I will take the time to give a full account of events within my knowledge,” he said.

Video: Meb Keflezighi stuns to win Boston Marathon

2018 French Open TV, streaming broadcast schedule

Getty Images
Leave a comment

NBC and Tennis Channel will combine to air live coverage of the French Open, which begins Sunday in Paris. NBC will broadcast Roland Garros for the 36th straight year, with TV coverage also streaming on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

Top-ranked Rafael Nadal eyes his 11th French Open title. That would tie Margaret Court‘s record for singles wins at a Grand Slam event (Court won 11 Australian Opens, but seven came when it was the Australian Championships, an amateur event.).

Other notables include Novak Djokovic, who last won a Slam at the 2016 French Open, and German Alexander Zverev, the top player in 2018. Roger Federer (rest) and Andy Murray (hip surgery) will miss the season’s second major tournament.

Serena Williams, a 23-time Grand Slam singles titlist and three-time winner at Roland Garros, plays her first Grand Slam since giving birth to daughter Alexis Ohanian on Sept. 1. Williams was not given a seen by French Open organizers as she comes back from maternity leave.

Williams has played four WTA Tour matches, all in March, since winning the 2017 Australian Open. Like Nadal, she can tie a Court record this year — the most career Grand Slam singles titles at 24.

Other contenders include top-ranked Simona Halep, Australian Open champ Caroline Wozniacki, U.S. Open champ Sloane Stephens and past French Open champions Maria SharapovaGarbiñe Muguruza and Jelena Ostapenko.

French Open Broadcast Schedule

Date Time (ET) Network Round
Sunday, May 27 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel First Round
12-3 p.m. NBC First Round
Monday, May 28 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel First Round
12-3 p.m. NBC First Round
Tuesday, May 29 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel First Round
Wednesday, May 30 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel Second Round
Thursday, May 31 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel Second Round
Friday, June 1 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel Third Round
Saturday, June 2 5 a.m.-12 p.m. Tennis Channel Third Round
12-3 p.m. NBC Third Round
Sunday, June 3 5 a.m.-12 p.m. Tennis Channel Fourth Round
12-3 p.m. NBC Fourth Round
Monday, June 4 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Tennis Channel Fourth Round
Tuesday, June 5 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tennis Channel Quarterfinals
Wednesday, June 6 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tennis Channel Quarterfinals
Thursday, June 7 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Tennis Channel Women’s Semifinals
11 a.m.-2 p.m. NBC Women’s Semifinals
Friday, June 8 6 a.m.-11 a.m. Tennis Channel Men’s Semifinals
11 a.m.-2 p.m. NBC Men’s Semifinals
Saturday, June 9 9 a.m.-1 p.m. NBC Women’s Final
Sunday, June 10 9 a.m.-2 p.m. NBC Men’s Final

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: No French Open seed for Serena Williams

Adam Rippon tops Tonya Harding, is sixth Olympian to win Dancing with the Stars

ABC
Leave a comment

Adam Rippon‘s dream year now includes a “Dancing with the Stars” title.

Rippon topped fellow Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding and Washington Redskins cornerback Josh Norman to win an all-athletes season of the series.

“This has been such an incredible experience, pushing yourself out of your comfort zone,” Rippon said on “Entertainment Tonight,” holding a Mirrorball Trophy with partner Jenna Johnson. “More than that, getting to meet somebody who I’m going to be friends with for the rest of my life.”

Olympian winners in the previous 25 seasons were all gold medalists: Apolo OhnoKristi YamaguchiShawn JohnsonMeryl Davis and Laurie Hernandez.

Rippon, 28, took team bronze at his first and last Games in PyeongChang in February, making the Olympics in his third and final try in January as the oldest U.S. Olympic rookie singles skater in 82 years.

The outspoken, charismatic Rippon became one of the biggest mainstream stars of the winter sports season after nearly missing the Olympic team in finishing fourth at nationals in January. He was then 10th at the Olympics.

In March, Rippon attended the Oscars and met Reese Witherspoon. In April, he was named to the Time 100 and in People Magazine’s Beautiful issue.

Rippon successfully managed a hectic travel schedule the last month, dotting the country for Stars on Ice shows while squeezing in rehearsals and live “Dancing” episodes in Los Angeles the last four Mondays.

On the finale, Rippon recorded the first perfect score for the abbreviated season — 10s from all three judges on the first of two dances. Harding and Norman later scored straight 10s on their second dances.

Rippon scored 28 out of 30 on his last dance, wearing a bowl-cut wig, and had the highest combined total of judges scores on the night. The winner was determined by a combination of viewer voting and judges scores.

“They brought it home every week,” Harding said of Rippon and Johnson on “Entertainment Tonight.” “Adam is wonderful, and his partner. They deserved it.”

Harding finished higher than Olympic rival Nancy Kerrigan did on the show last year.

“Last night felt like it was the first time I landed the triple axel,” was posted on Harding’s Instagram.

Olympians/Paralympians on Dancing with the Stars
Season 1 
— Evander Holyfield (1984, boxing)
Season 4 — Apolo Ohno (2002-2010, short track speed skating) — WINNER, Clyde Drexler (1992, basketball)
Season 5 — Floyd Mayweather Jr. (1996, boxing)
Season 6 — Kristi Yamaguchi (1992, figure skating) — WINNER, Monica Seles (1996-2000, tennis)
Season 7 — Maurice Greene (2000-2004, track and field), Misty May-Treanor (2000-2012, volleyball)
Season 8 — Shawn Johnson (2008, gymnastics) — WINNER
Season 9 — Louie Vito (2010, snowboarding), Natalie Coughlin (2004-2012, swimming)
Season 10 — Evan Lysacek (2006-2010, figure skating)
Season 12 — Sugar Ray Leonard (1976, boxing)
Season 13 — Hope Solo (2004-2016, soccer)
Season 14 — Martina Navratilova (2004, tennis)
Season 15 — Shawn Johnson, Apolo Ohno
Season 16 — Dorothy Hamill (1976, figure skating), Aly Raisman (2012-2016, gymnastics)
Season 18 — Meryl Davis (2010-2014, figure skating) — WINNER, Charlie White (2010-2014, figure skating), Amy Purdy (2014, snowboarding)
Season 19 — Lolo Jones (2008, 2012, 2014, track and field/bobsled)
Season 20 — Nastia Liukin (2008, gymnastics)
Season 23 — Laurie Hernandez (2016, gymnastics) — WINNER, Ryan Lochte (2004-2016, swimming)
Season 24 — Simone Biles (2016, gymnastics), Nancy Kerrigan (1992-94, figure skating)
Season 25 — Victoria Arlen (2012, swimming)
Season 26 — Adam Rippon (2018, figure skating) — WINNER, Jamie Anderson (2014-18, snowboarding), Chris Mazdzer (2010-18, luge), Jennie Finch (2004-08, softball), Mirai Nagasu (2010, 2018, figure skating), Tonya Harding (1992-94, figure skating)

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Nathan Chen commits to Yale this fall