Tyson Gay

Tyson Gay returns Olympic silver medal with doping ban

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Tyson Gay was suspended one year for his failed drug tests last year and loses all of his results from July 15, 2012, including an Olympic 4x100m relay silver medal, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said Friday.

Gay, 31, has returned the silver medal to the U.S. Olympic Committee.

Asked if Gay’s disqualified results meant the entire 2012 U.S. Olympic 4x100m relay team has been stripped of its medals, a spokesman for the IAAF [track and field’s international governing body] responded via email:

“Yes – according to IAAF Rule 41 of IAAF competition rules of 2012.”

Rule 41 states:

1. Where the Athlete who has committed an anti-doping rule violation competed as a member of a relay team, the relay team shall be automatically disqualified from the Event in question, with all resulting consequences for the relay team, including the forfeiture of all titles, awards, medals, points and prize money.

That would move Trinidad and Tobago up to silver and France to bronze.

“The IOC and the IAAF are the ruling authority on that decision, and we will obviously cooperate with them on this matter in the days ahead,” USOC spokesperson Patrick Sandusky said in a statement.

“We appreciate Tyson doing the right thing by immediately withdrawing from competition once he was notified, accepting responsibility for his decisions, and fully and truthfully cooperating with us in our ongoing investigation into the circumstances surrounding his case,” USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said in a press release.

Gay tested positive three times last year for “an exogenous androgenic anabolic steroid and/or its metabolites,” USADA said, but since the tests were in short succession, they were treated as one failed offense.

Gay revealed he failed a drug test on July 14 and has not competed since. USADA backdated his one-year suspension to June 23, 2013, the day one of his samples was collected at the U.S. Outdoor Championships.

Gay would be eligible for this year’s U.S. Championships under a one-year suspension, but he would have to file a petition by June 16 for consideration, according to The Associated Press. Nationals start June 26. Gay plans to return in July, according to Reuters.

“For providing substantial assistance to USADA; Gay was eligible for up to a three-quarter reduction of the otherwise applicable two-year sanction under the [World Anti-Doping Agency] Code (or a six-month suspension). Gay’s sanction is subject to appeal by the IAAF and by the World Anti-Doping Agency,” USADA said in its press release.

Gay first used a product that contained a prohibited substance on July 15, 2012, USADA said, less than three weeks before his first race at the London Olympics. All of his competitive results since that date have been disqualified, USADA said.

Gay was part of the U.S. 4x100m relay team that won silver on Aug. 11, 2012. He ran the third leg after Justin Gatlin and Trell Kimmons and before Ryan Bailey.

“I don’t know of anything going on,” Gatlin said when asked if he had been contacted about his Olympic relay result, according to the Wall Street Journal.

It was the first Olympic medal of Gay’s career. Gay won triple gold at the 2007 World Championships, before Usain Bolt began dominating sprints. Gay has since dealt with injuries but ran 9.69 seconds in the 100m in 2009 and is tied as the second fastest man ever with Jamaican Yohan Blake.

“USA Track & Field is gravely disappointed any time an athlete uses performance-enhancing drugs, and Tyson Gay’s case serves as a lesson about the consequences of making poor decisions,” USA Track and Field CEO Max Siegel said in a statement. “We appreciate that Tyson accepted responsibility and has assisted USADA by providing information to help battle the use of [performance-enhancing drugs]. We thank USADA for their vigilant work on this case and for their leadership in the pursuit of clean sport.”

Gay’s first positive test was revealed the same day last year that Jamaican Olympic champion sprinters Asafa Powell and Sherone Simpson‘s positive tests were also revealed, for banned stimulants.

Powell and Simpson have been suspended until December but have planned appeals.

“I don’t have a sabotage story,” Gay told the AP in a phone interview last year. ” … I basically put my trust in someone and was let down.”

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Boglarka Kapas, world champion swimmer, tests positive for coronavirus

Boglarka Kapas
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Boglarka Kapas, the Hungarian swimmer and world 200m butterfly champion, said she tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I don’t have any symptoms yet, and that’s why it’s important for you to know that even if you feel healthy you can spread the virus,” was posted on her social media. “Please be careful, stay at home and stay healthy.”

Nine total members of the Hungarian national team — including swimmers and staff — have tested positive, according to the federation.

Kapas said her first test was negative but a second test showed she had the virus. She was staying in quarantine at home for two weeks.

Kapas, 26, won the 200m fly at last summer’s world championships by passing Americans Hali Flickinger and Katie Drabot in the last 25 meters. She clocked 2:06.78 to prevail by .17 of a second.

Kapas also took bronze in the Rio Olympic 800m freestyle won by Katie Ledecky.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

NHL players: Marie-Philip Poulin is world’s best female hockey player

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The U.S. may have the world’s best women’s hockey team, but NHL players believe Canadian Marie-Philip Poulin is the world’s best player.

Poulin received the most votes out of 496 responses in the 2019-20 NHLPA Player Poll, conducted before the season was suspended. The tally:

Poulin: 39.92%
Hilary Knight (USA): 36.29%
Kendall Coyne Schofield (USA): 15.52%
Emily Pfalzer Matheson (USA): 1.41%
Other: 6.85%

Last year, Knight received the highest percentage of votes from 203 NHL players (27.59), edging Poulin (24.14) with Amanda Kessel third (12.81) and Coyne Schofield and Pfalzer Matheson each receiving 5.91 percent.

Why were Poulin and Knight swapped this year? Perhaps Poulin’s Canadian team winning the debut of the NHL All-Star Skills Competition women’s 3-on-3 game on Jan. 24, even though Knight scored and Poulin did not.

Poulin, now 29, scored both goals in the 2010 Olympic final and the game-tying and -winning goals in the 2014 Olympic final. Even before her Olympic debut at age 18, the daughter of Quebec hospital workers was dubbed “the female Sidney Crosby.”

Knight, 30, led last April’s world championship tournament with seven goals as the U.S. won a fifth straight title. Poulin played 4 minutes, 44 seconds, total at the tournament, missing time with a knee injury.

This spring’s tournament, which was to start Tuesday, was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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