What Rio Olympic golf fields would look like with year-end rankings

Rory McIlroy
0 Comments

The Rio Olympic golf fields won’t be determined until July 2016, but it’s always fun to project.

The men’s and women’s fields are set to include a maximum of 60 players each. Everybody in the top 15 of the world rankings come July 2016 will be eligible, up to four per country.

After that, the fields will be filled by the next highest-ranked players with a maximum of two players per nation.

World golf rankings are made up of a two-year window of players’ results, weighing recent results and bigger tournaments more heavily. Therefore, the rankings in July 2016, from which the Olympic fields will be determined, will mostly include yet-to-be-played tournament results.

Tiger Woods would not make the Olympic golf field if the current, year-end rankings hold. He is No. 32, down from No. 1 one year ago and 17th among Americans. It is his lowest ranking since Nov. 26, 2011.

Woods is the first player to drop outside the top 20 after being year-end No. 1 the previous year. The Official World Golf Ranking debuted in 1986.

Phil Mickelson (No. 14, seventh among Americans), Ernie Els (No. 63, fourth among South Africans) and the British trio of Lee Westwood, Ian Poulter and Luke Donald would also NOT qualify.

Miguel Angel Jimenez, who turns 51 on Jan. 5, would make it. As would Fiji’s Vijay Singh, barely, as the 57th out of 60 golfers. Singh turns 52 on Feb. 22.

Singh and top-ranked Rory McIlroy are the only players with more than two major championships who would make the field off today’s rankings.

The last player to make the men’s field under today’s rankings would be Colombian Marcelo Rozo, who is No. 366 in the world.

The last player to make the women’s field would be Indian Gauri Monga, who is No. 447. There are 137 South Korean women ranked ahead of Monga.

Brazil is guaranteed at least one spot in the men’s and women’s fields, so the lowest-ranked women’s player is currently Brazilian Miriam Nagl, who is No. 570.

Here’s what the men’s and women’s fields would look like if using the year-end 2014 rankings:

Men
1. Rory McIlroy (IRL)
2. Henrik Stenson (SWE)
3. Adam Scott (AUS)
4. Bubba Watson (USA)
5. Sergio Garcia (ESP)
6. Justin Rose (GBR)
7. Jim Furyk (USA)
8. Jason Day (AUS)
9. Jordan Spieth (USA)
10. Rickie Fowler (USA)
11. Martin Kaymer (GER)
12. Graeme McDowell (IRL)
13. Hideki Matsuyama (JPN)
14. Victor Dubuisson (FRA)
15. Jamie Donaldson (GBR)
16. Joost Luiten (NED)
17. Charl Schwartzel (RSA)
18. Thomas Bjorn (DEN)
19. Thongchai Jaidee (THA)
20. Miguel Angel Jimenez (ESP)
21. Louis Oosthuizen (RSA)
22. Mikko Ilonen (FIN)
23. Alexander Levy (FRA)
24. Francesco Molinari (ITA)
25. Koumei Oda (JPN)
26. Graham Delaet (CAN)
27. Jonas Blixt (SWE)
28. Marcel Siem (GER)
29. Anirban Lahiri (IND)
30. Bernd Wiesberger (AUT)
31. Angel Cabrera (ARG)
32. Thorbjorn Olesen (DEN)
33. Brendon de Jonge (ZIM)
34. Bae Song-moon (KOR)
35. Fabrizio Zanotti (PAR)
36. Edoardo Molinari (ITA)
37. Noh Seung-yul (KOR)
38. David Hearn (CAN)
39. Emiliano Grillo (ARG)
40. Prom Meesawat (THA)
41. Nicolas Colsaerts (BEL)
42. Carlos Ortiz (MEX)
43. Camilo Villegas (COL)
44. Antonio Lascuna (PHI)
45. Felipe Aguilar (CHI)
46. Liang Wen-chong (CHN)
47. Wu Ashun (CHN)
48. Rashid Khan (IND)
49. Robert-Jan Derksen (NED)
50. Danny Lee (NZL)
51. Angelo Que (PHI)
52. Siddikur Rahman (BAN)
53. Thomas Pieters (BEL)
54. Mark Tullo (CHI)
55. Chan Shih-chang (TPE)
56. Ryan Fox (NZL)
57. Vijay Singh (FIJ)
58. Jhonattan Vegas (VEN)
59. Adison da Silva (BRA)
60. Marcelo Rozo (COL)

Women
1. Inbee Park (KOR)
2. Lydia Ko (NZL)
3. Stacy Lewis (USA)
4. Suzann Pettersen (NOR)
5. Shanshan Feng (CHN)
6. Michelle Wie (USA)
7. So Yeon Ryu (KOR)
8. Hyo-Joo Kim (KOR)
9. Karrie Webb (AUS)
10. Lexi Thompson (USA)
11. Kyu Jung Baek (KOR)
12. Anna Nordqvist (SWE)
13. Cristie Kerr (USA)
14. Azahara Munoz (ESP)
15. Pomanong Phatlum (THA)
16. Catriona Matthew (GBR)
17. Lee-Anne Pace (RSA)
18. Teresa Lu (TPE)
19. Julieta Granada (PAR)
20. Charley Hull (GBR)
21. Shiho Oyama (JPN)
22. Karine Icher (FRA)
23. Carlota Ciganda (ESP)
24. Sakura Yokomine (JPN)
25. Sandra Gal (GER)
26. Caroline Masson (GER)
27. Caroline Hedwall (SWE)
28. Gwladys Nocera (FRA)
29. Line Hansen (DEN)
30. Minjee Lee (AUS)
31. Xiyu Lin (CHN)
32. Yani Tseng (TPE)
33. Mariajo Uribe (COL)
34. Stephanie Meadow (IRL)
35. Onnarin Sattayabanphot (THA)
36. Dewi Schreefel (NED)
37. Stacy Bregman (RSA)
38. Malene Jorgensen (DEN)
39. Giulia Sergas (ITA)
40. Christel Boeljon (NED)
41. Klara Spilkova (CZE)
42. Diana Luna (ITA)
43. Jennifer Rosales (PHI)
44. Brooke Henderson (CAN)
45. Alejandra Llaneza (MEX)
46. Kelly Tan (MAS)
47. Lisa McCloskey (COL)
48. Maria Balikoeva (RUS)
49. Alena Sharp (CAN)
50. Paz Echeverria (CHI)
51. Fabienne In-Albon (SUI)
52. Noora Tamminen (FIN)
53. Minea Blomqvist (FIN)
54. Marianne Skapnord (NOR)
55. Veronica Felilbert (VEN)
56. Christine Wolf (AUT)
57. Chloe Leurquin (BEL)
58. Margarita Ramos (MEX)
59. Gauri Monga (IND)
60. Miriam Nagl (BRA)

Video: Tara Lipinski, Johnny Weir share New Year’s resolutions

Aksel Lund Svindal, Olympic Alpine champ, has testicular cancer, ‘prognosis good’

Aksel Lund Svindal
Getty
0 Comments

Aksel Lund Svindal, a retired Olympic Alpine skiing champion from Norway, said he underwent surgery for testicular cancer and the prognosis “looked very good.”

“Tests, scans and surgery all happened very quickly,” Svindal, 39, wrote on social media. “And already after the first week I knew the prognoses looked very good. All thanks to that first decision to go see a doctor as soon as I suspected something was off.”

Svindal retired in 2019 after winning the Olympic super-G in 2010 and downhill in 2018. He also won five world titles among the downhill, combined and giant slalom and two World Cup overall titles.

Svindal said he felt a change in his body that prompted him to see a doctor.

“The last few weeks have been different,” he wrote. “But I’m able to say weeks and not months because of great medical help, a little luck and a good decision.

“I wasn’t sure what it was, or if it was anything at all. … [I] was quickly transferred to the hospital where they confirmed what the doctor suspected. Testicle cancer.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
Getty
0 Comments

The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France vs. Mali Group B
4 a.m. Australia vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada vs. Japan Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final