Boston 2024

U.S. Olympic Committee chooses Boston for 2024 Olympic bid

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Boston will be the 2024 U.S. Olympic bid city.

The U.S. Olympic Committee chose Boston over fellow finalists Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C, announcing the decision after a board of directors meeting in Denver on Thursday.

The decision took multiple rounds of voting after final presentations from each of the four cities, according to the USOC.

Boston’s ties to the Olympics

“We’re excited about our plans to submit a bid for the 2024 Games and feel we have an incredibly strong partner in Boston that will work with us to present a compelling bid,” USOC Chairman Larry Probst said in a press release. “We’re grateful to the leaders in each of the four cities for their partnership and interest in hosting the most exciting sports competition on earth. The deliberative and collaborative process that we put in place for selecting a city has resulted in a strong U.S. bid that can truly serve the athletes and the Olympic and Paralympic movements.”

Boston, which has never bid for the Olympics before, will go up against international bids including but not limited to Rome, Berlin or Hamburg and possibly Paris and a South African applicant.

“This selection is in recognition of our city’s talent, diversity and global leadership,” Boston mayor Marty Walsh said in a press release. “Our goal is to host Olympic and Paralympic Games that are innovative, walkable and hospitable to all. Boston hopes to welcome the world’s greatest athletes to one of the world’s great cities.”

The bid submission deadline is Sept. 15. The International Olympic Committee will choose candidate cities from those applicant cities in April/May 2016.

IOC members will vote to choose the 2024 Olympic host city in 2017 at a session in Lima, Peru.

Worldwide 2024 Olympic bidding coverage

The U.S. last hosted the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002 and the Summer Olympics in Atlanta in 1996.

The current 22-year stretch is its longest gap between hosting Olympics since it went 28 years between 1932 and 1960.

Boston’s bid plans to make use of area colleges and universities in a plan that has been called compact. More details of its plan can be found on its website.

“The city is the Olympic park,” Dan O’Connell, president of the Boston 2024 Partnership, told the Boston Globe in September. “It becomes a public-transit and walking Olympics.”

Italy and Germany’s Olympic Committees said they will also bid for the 2024 Olympics. Rome will be Italy’s bid. Germany will choose between Berlin and Hamburg by the end of March.

A South African member of the IOC said his nation is also readying to bid for the 2024 Olympics. An African nation has never hosted an Olympics.

Paris may also bid to host the Olympics on the 100-year anniversary of the last time it hosted.

Early details of Boston’s 2024 Olympic concept

Of the four U.S. finalist cities, Los Angeles was the only one that hosted an Olympics — in 1932 and 1984.

San Francisco attempted bids for the 2012 and 2016 Olympics. New York and Chicago became the respective U.S. bids those years and lost in IOC voting to London and Rio de Janeiro.

President Barack Obama, who pitched at the IOC session in Copenhagen in 2009 for the Chicago 2016 bid, released this statement:

“The President and First Lady extend their congratulations to the City of Boston on its nomination by the United States Olympic Committee to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The city has taught all of us what it means to be Boston Strong. The President and First Lady couldn’t be prouder of this accomplishment and of all of our nation’s athletes, and strongly support the effort to bring the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games to the United States. We hope to welcome athletes from around the globe to compete in Boston in 2024.”

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U.S. Olympic, USA Gymnastics leaders set for another Senate hearing

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Recently replaced U.S. Olympic Committee acting CEO Susanne Lyons, USA Gymnastics President and CEO Kerry Perry and Michigan State interim president John Engler are scheduled witnesses for a Senate subcommittee hearing next Tuesday on reforms following the Larry Nassar sexual-abuse crimes.

The hearing is titled, “Strengthening and Empowering U.S. Amateur Athletes: Moving Forward with Solutions” and will stream live at https://www.commerce.senate.gov/ on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. ET.

“The hearing will focus on changes made by the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), USA Gymnastics (USAG), and Michigan State University (MSU) to protect Olympic and amateur athletes from abuse,” according to the subcommittee’s website. “It will examine recent reforms to provide safe environments for athletes and how these reforms are being implemented.”

The subcommittee held hearings April 18 and June 5 with testimonies from gymnasts and other athletes who were abused, former Michigan State president Lou Anna Simon and former senior vice president of USA Gymnastics Rhonda Faehn. Former USA Gymnastics CEO Steve Penny also attended the June 5 hearing but refused to answer questions.

Lyons and Perry were questioned at a House subcommittee hearing May 23.

The USOC last Thursday named Sarah Hirshland its new CEO, replacing Lyons, who had been in the role on an interim basis since Scott Blackmun resigned in February. Blackmun, who had been CEO since January 2010, left citing prostate cancer and the USOC’s need to immediately address the USA Gymnastics sexual-abuse scandal.

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Annemiek van Vleuten wins La Course with epic comeback (video)

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Annemiek van Vleuten, the cyclist who returned from a horrific Rio Olympic road race crash to become world champion, repeated as La Course winner with an epic last-kilometer comeback on Tuesday.

Van Vleuten sprinted from several seconds behind countrywoman Anna van der Breggen to win the one-day race, including four categorized climbs, contested on part of the Tour de France stage 10 course later that day.

“With 300 meters to go, I still thought I got second, and then I saw her dying,” Van Vleuten said, adding later, according to Cyclingnews.com, “With 500 meters to go my team director in the car gave up and stopped cheering for me.”

In Rio, van Vleuten suffered three small spine fractures and a concussion when her brakes appeared to lock, and she flipped over into a ditch during the road race. Van Vleuten was alone in the lead at the time with about seven miles to go of the 87-mile course.

She was eventually hospitalized in intensive care.

Van der Breggen went on to win the Olympic title, while van Vleuten returned quick enough to race at the October 2016 World Championships.

Van Vleuten, 35, won her first world title 13 months after the Rio Games, taking the time trial crown ahead of van der Breggen by 12 seconds. She also won the 10-stage Giro Rosa that concluded on Sunday.

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