Boston 2024

U.S. Olympic Committee chooses Boston for 2024 Olympic bid

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Boston will be the 2024 U.S. Olympic bid city.

The U.S. Olympic Committee chose Boston over fellow finalists Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C, announcing the decision after a board of directors meeting in Denver on Thursday.

The decision took multiple rounds of voting after final presentations from each of the four cities, according to the USOC.

Boston’s ties to the Olympics

“We’re excited about our plans to submit a bid for the 2024 Games and feel we have an incredibly strong partner in Boston that will work with us to present a compelling bid,” USOC Chairman Larry Probst said in a press release. “We’re grateful to the leaders in each of the four cities for their partnership and interest in hosting the most exciting sports competition on earth. The deliberative and collaborative process that we put in place for selecting a city has resulted in a strong U.S. bid that can truly serve the athletes and the Olympic and Paralympic movements.”

Boston, which has never bid for the Olympics before, will go up against international bids including but not limited to Rome, Berlin or Hamburg and possibly Paris and a South African applicant.

“This selection is in recognition of our city’s talent, diversity and global leadership,” Boston mayor Marty Walsh said in a press release. “Our goal is to host Olympic and Paralympic Games that are innovative, walkable and hospitable to all. Boston hopes to welcome the world’s greatest athletes to one of the world’s great cities.”

The bid submission deadline is Sept. 15. The International Olympic Committee will choose candidate cities from those applicant cities in April/May 2016.

IOC members will vote to choose the 2024 Olympic host city in 2017 at a session in Lima, Peru.

Worldwide 2024 Olympic bidding coverage

The U.S. last hosted the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City in 2002 and the Summer Olympics in Atlanta in 1996.

The current 22-year stretch is its longest gap between hosting Olympics since it went 28 years between 1932 and 1960.

Boston’s bid plans to make use of area colleges and universities in a plan that has been called compact. More details of its plan can be found on its website.

“The city is the Olympic park,” Dan O’Connell, president of the Boston 2024 Partnership, told the Boston Globe in September. “It becomes a public-transit and walking Olympics.”

Italy and Germany’s Olympic Committees said they will also bid for the 2024 Olympics. Rome will be Italy’s bid. Germany will choose between Berlin and Hamburg by the end of March.

A South African member of the IOC said his nation is also readying to bid for the 2024 Olympics. An African nation has never hosted an Olympics.

Paris may also bid to host the Olympics on the 100-year anniversary of the last time it hosted.

Early details of Boston’s 2024 Olympic concept

Of the four U.S. finalist cities, Los Angeles was the only one that hosted an Olympics — in 1932 and 1984.

San Francisco attempted bids for the 2012 and 2016 Olympics. New York and Chicago became the respective U.S. bids those years and lost in IOC voting to London and Rio de Janeiro.

President Barack Obama, who pitched at the IOC session in Copenhagen in 2009 for the Chicago 2016 bid, released this statement:

“The President and First Lady extend their congratulations to the City of Boston on its nomination by the United States Olympic Committee to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The city has taught all of us what it means to be Boston Strong. The President and First Lady couldn’t be prouder of this accomplishment and of all of our nation’s athletes, and strongly support the effort to bring the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games to the United States. We hope to welcome athletes from around the globe to compete in Boston in 2024.”

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Alysa Liu rallies to win Junior Grand Prix with another quadruple jump

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U.S. figure skating champion Alysa Liu landed a quadruple Lutz for a second straight Junior Grand Prix, rallying from fourth after the short program to win an event in Poland on Friday.

Liu, who in January became the youngest U.S. champion in history at age 13, won both of her starts in her first season on the Junior Grand Prix to become the first U.S. woman to qualify for the six-skater Junior Grand Prix Final since 2013 (Polina Edmunds and Karen Chen). The Final is held with the senior Grand Prix Final in Turin, Italy, in December.

She won Friday by 6.63 points by surpassing a pair of Russians, a rarity in this era. Her free skate is here.

Liu trailed by 4.03 points after doubling a planned triple loop in the short program. She was the lone skater in the field to attempt a triple Axel (landing three of them, including two in combination and one with a negative grade of execution) or a quad.

Liu tallied 138.99 points in the free skate and 203.10 overall. She ranks sixth in the world this season by best total scores among junior and senior skaters, though some top skaters have yet to compete.

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MORE: 2019 Senior Grand Prix assignments

Rafaela Silva, first Brazilian gold medalist at Rio Olympics, claims innocence after positive drug test

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Rafaela Silva, the judoka who grew up in Rio’s most famously violent favela to become Brazil’s first gold medalist at the Rio Olympics, reportedly tested positive for a banned substance last month.

Silva tested positive for fenoterol, a substance that can be legal to treat asthma if an athlete has a therapeutic use exemption (TUE). Silva did not have a TUE before testing positive at the Pan American Games in August, according to Brazilian media.

A possible punishment has not been announced.

Silva claimed innocence at a news conference Friday afternoon, saying that a young child with whom she had bodily contact at her training location used the substance, and she plans to compete at a domestic event this weekend, according to O Globo.

Silva, 27, backed up her Rio Olympic 57kg title by taking bronze at the world championships later in August. If she is punished for the positive test, Silva could lose that bronze medal, though she said Friday that she had a clean drug test at worlds, according to O Globo.

Silva, from Rio’s Ciadade de Deus favela, has the Olympic rings tattooed on her right bicep with the inscription “God knows how much I’ve suffered and what I’ve done to get here.”

Brazil’s top female swimmer, Etiene Medeiros, reportedly tested positive for fenoterol in May 2016 but was cleared to compete at the Rio Olympics.

In PyeongChang, Slovenian hockey player Ziga Jeglic tested positive for fenoterol and was scratched before his nation’s last game before it was announced. Jeglic was suspended from the Games and, later, was suspended eight months.

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