Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn wins No. 62, ties record (video)

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Lindsey Vonn equaled the women’s Alpine skiing World Cup record for career victories with her 62nd win in a downhill in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy, on Sunday.

The 2010 Olympic downhill champion clocked 1 minute, 39.61 seconds, finishing .32 faster than second-place Elisabeth Goergl of Austria. Italian Daniela Merighetti was third, .54 behind.

Vonn screamed twice after she crossed the finish line and dropped to the snow in delight, much like her reaction when she notched her first victory since two major knee surgeries on Dec. 6 in Lake Louise, Canada.

Vonn, who first suffered the major knee injuries in a February 2013 crash at the World Championships, missed the Sochi Olympics after a January 2014 surgery. NBC will air a documentary on her comeback next Sunday.

“A lot of people counted me out and a lot of people thought I would never reach this record and a lot of people thought that I would never win again,” Vonn said, according to SkiRacing.com. “I never stopped believing in myself, and I think I proved everyone wrong.”

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In Cortina, Vonn equaled the record of 62 wins set by Austrian legend Annemarie Moser-Proell in 1980. She will try to break the record in a super-G in Cortina on Monday.

Moser-Proell reached 62 wins in 174 World Cup starts (almost half Vonn’s current total of starts), retiring after the 1980 Olympic season and starting a family. She won her only Olympic gold medal in Lake Placid and was just shy of 27 years old in her last World Cup race. Vonn is 30.

Not only did Moser-Proell retire at an early age, she also retired twice. Her first leave was at age 22 in 1975, when she married a ski salesman, nursed her dying father and missed the 1975-76 season, including the Innsbruck Olympics. She returned to racing the following season.

Vonn and Moser-Proell have met a few times and sat down for a 25-minute conversation in German before this season. Moser-Proell told Vonn she hoped the American would break her record, according to this translation.

“I don’t know her very well,” Vonn said in December. “She’s a very nice woman, very humble and down to Earth.”

Cortina is a special venue for Vonn, the site of the first of her 107 World Cup podium finishes on Jan. 18, 2004.

“When I got my first podium here I never thought I would make it this far in my career,” Vonn said, according to SkiRacing.com. “That was the first time where I really thought I could be a contender in World Cup and never in a million years would I believe that I would break, or at least tie, the wins record.”

Retired Swede Ingemar Stenmark holds the men’s record with 86 victories.

Vonn has won three times in seven races this season and leads the World Cup downhill standings.

“I think 62 is more important to me [than 63],” Vonn said, according to SkiRacing.com. “You know, now I feel like from here on out I’m already tied for No. 1, so I’m just going to continue to try to win races, and I’m skiing for another three years [through the 2018 Olympics] so there is a lot of racing left in me.”

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Allyson Felix, Noah Lyles headline Inspiration Games; TV, stream info

Allyson Felix, Noah Lyles
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In Allyson Felix‘s 17 years on the senior international level, she has never experienced anything like what Thursday will bring.

Felix, a nine-time Olympic medalist, will line up at a track in California to race 150 meters. Her opponents will be on the other side of the country — Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo in Florida — and the other side of the Atlantic Ocean — Swiss Mujinga Kambundji in Zurich.

The Inspiration Games air live on Thursday from 2-3:30 p.m. ET on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app. The meet is a repurposed version of a Diamond League stop in Zurich, Switzerland.

“I’ve just been training and training and training, so anything to break it up. … this seemed like something great. I just loved the concept,” said Felix, who memorably raced alone in at the Rio Olympics in a re-run of the 4x100m first round. “I’m not really sure what to expect. I think [it’s] the first time that we’ve all done anything like this. I’m just approaching it to have fun and hopefully give people something to watch and to be entertained by. I think we all miss sports so much.”

Meet organizers had to get creative with the coronavirus pandemic limiting athlete travel and group events. The Impossible Games was first to go on June 11, with limited athletes competing in an Oslo stadium (and others competing in different countries).

The Inspiration Games takes virtual competition to another level. Felix, Miller-Uibo and Kambundji are all slated to sprint at the same time in different locations. As are world champion Noah Lyles, Frenchman Christophe Lemaitre and the Netherlands’ Churandy Martina in a later 200m.

It marks the first meet since the coronavirus pandemic for Felix, bidding to make her fifth Olympic team and first as a mom. The pandemic and restrictions in California forced her to train on streets.

“Everything is still pretty much locked down,” she said. “You can’t get onto a track without jumping a fence.”

Lyles raced last Saturday at a small meet in Florida, outsprinting Justin Gatlin in a 100m heat (9.93 seconds to 9.99 with a hefty 4 meter/second tailwind).

The regular Diamond League calendar is scheduled to resume in August.

Here are the Inspiration Games entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

1:35 p.m. ET — Men’s Pole Vault
1:35 — Women’s Pole Vault
2:05 — Men’s Triple Jump
2:10 — Women’s 150m
2:27 — Men’s 100 Yards
2:41 — Women’s 300m Hurdles
3:06 — Men’s 200m
3:20 — Women’s 3x100m Relay

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s Pole Vault — 1:35 p.m.
Greek Katerina Stefanidi, a Stanford grad, and American Sandi Morris renew their rivalry. Stefanidi will be in California. Morris will be in Florida. Swede Angelica Bengtsson rounds out the field. Stefanidi relegated Morris to silver at the 2016 Olympics and 2017 Worlds. But Morris snapped’ Stefanidi’s streak of eight straight wins in their head-to-head back in 2018 and has bettered Stefanidi in four of their last six meetings.

Men’s Triple Jump — 2:05 p.m.
Double Olympic champion Christian Taylor takes on longtime rival Pedro Pablo Pichardo, a Cuban-born Portuguese, and American Omar Craddock. Taylor bettered Pichardo in five of their last six meetings. In more than 30 meets together, Taylor has lost to Craddock just once (when Taylor has competed in full).

Women’s 150m — 2:10 p.m.
Felix and Miller-Uibo go head to head for the first time since the 2017 World Championships. Their most memorable duel came at the Rio Olympics, where a diving Miller-Uibo edged Felix by .07 for 400m gold. While Miller-Uibo and Felix primarily compete over a full lap, the 150m is closer to Kambundji’s wheelhouse. The Swiss earned 200m bronze at the 2019 World Championships, taking advantage of a depleted field.

Men’s 100 Yards — 2:27 p.m.
Triple Olympic medalist Andre De Grasse of Canada, Olympic 110m hurdles champion Omar McLeod of Jamaica and French veteran Jimmy Vicaut all train in Florida and will presumably be racing at the same venue on Thursday. The 100 yards is scantly contested in top-level meets. Nobody has broken nine seconds in a 100-yard (91.44-meter) race, according to World Athletics. But Usain Bolt‘s estimated 100-yard time en route to his 2009 world record in the 100m was 8.87 seconds.

Men’s 200m — 3:06 p.m.
Lyles has lost an outdoor 200m just once in this Olympic cycle and wouldn’t normally be pestered by Lemaitre or Martina, but these are unusual times and this an unusual competition. Lemaitre is the Olympic bronze medalist but was sixth at last year’s French Championships. Martina, 36, and, like Lemaitre, hasn’t broken 20 seconds in more than three years.

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Usain Bolt shares first photos of baby daughter, Olympia Lightning Bolt

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Usain Bolt shared the first public photos — and the unique name — of his daughter, Olympia Lightning Bolt.

Bolt’s girlfriend, Kasi Bennett, gave birth in May.

“Now we have started a new chapter together with our daughter Olympia Lightning Bolt,” was posted on Bolt’s social media. “I look forward to what the future will bring for us but be reassured that I will be the ROCK for this family.”

Another famous Olympic champion, Serena Williams, named her daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. in 2017.

In Olympic history, one Olympian went by the name “Olympia,” according to Olympedia.org. That’s Australian rower Olympia Aldersey, who placed seventh in Rio in the eight event.

In February, Bolt said he would not encourage his child to pursue sprinting.

“That’s going to be hard for my kid,” he said during Super Bowl weekend in Miami. “If they want to do it, I’m fine with it. But initially I’m going to say don’t do it, ’cause I know the pressure that will come along with it.”

After Kobe Bryant‘s death, Bolt said he was hoping for a daughter.

“I could see in his eyes how much he loved his girls,” Bolt said. “I would love to have that feeling.”

Bolt, 33, has said he hopes to have three children.

“I’m excited, but I’m nervous,” he said. “I’ve always been a fun guy, I’ve always been that person. But should I be that person and make my girlfriend be the bad guy? Those are the questions I’m asking, so we’ll see what happens.”

Bolt, who holds world records in the 100m (9.58 seconds) and 200m (19.19), retired after the 2017 World Championships. The Tokyo Olympics in 2021 will be the first Games without the Jamaican legend since the 2000 Sydney Games.

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