UCI boss has ‘no remit to reduce’ Lance Armstrong’s lifetime ban

Lance Armstrong
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Lance Armstrong‘s cooperation with an independent reform commission’s probe into cycling’s doping culture has not helped his case to have his lifetime ban reduced. At least not yet.

Brian Cookson, the International Cycling Union president, said in January 2014 there was “the possibility of a reduction” in Armstrong’s lifetime ban if he assisted in doping investigations, but that it was in the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency’s hands.

On Monday, Cookson repeated that it’s up to USADA, after an independent reform commission released a 227-page report on cycling’s doping culture Sunday. The investigation included interviewing Armstrong.

“I’ve got no remit to reduce the ban of Lance Armstrong,” Cookson told reporters Monday, according to VeloNews. “I have no desire to be the president that let Armstrong off the hook, or anything like that.”

USADA banned Armstrong for life in 2012. He was stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles and later admitted to doping during his cycling career in January 2013.

Armstrong’s name was prevalent in the 227-page report released Sunday, with no major new revelations from a 13-month investigation. As were the names of former UCI bosses Hein Verbruggen and Pat McQuaid, deemed ineffective at best in fighting doping during their reigns.

“The commission did not feel that anything that Lance Armstrong had told them was sufficient for them to recommend a reduction in his sanction,” Cookson said, according to VeloNews. “I have found no evidence to contradict that.”

Cookson reportedly added that the commission asked him to facilitate discussion between USADA and Armstrong.

“I am grateful to CIRC for seeking the truth and allowing me to assist in that search,” Armstrong said in a statement Monday. “I am deeply sorry for many things I have done. However, it is my hope that revealing the truth will lead to a bright, dope-free future for the sport I love, and will allow all young riders emerging from small towns throughout the world in years to come to chase their dreams without having to face the lose-lose choices that so many of my friends, teammates, and opponents faced. I hope that all riders who competed and doped can feel free to come forward and help the tonic of truth heal this great sport.”

In a statement Monday, USADA CEO Travis Tygart did not mention possible discussion with Armstrong.

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