Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte

Four storylines to watch at Pro Swim Series at Mesa

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Michael Phelps will gather the most buzz, but this week’s Pro Swim Series at Mesa is loaded with the most men’s and women’s talent at one meet since last summer.

Entry lists for the Arizona competition include 24 Olympic medalists that combined to capture 95 total medals across the last three Summer Games, according to USA Swimming.

The meet begins with distance races Wednesday. Universal Sports Network will air live TV coverage of finals Thursday and Friday at 9 p.m. ET. Racing concludes Saturday. A complete webcast of the meet will be available on USASwimming.org.

1. Michael Phelps’ return

Last year, Mesa marked Phelps’ first meet in 20 months, since the London Olympics. This year, it’s his first meet in eight months, since his September DUI arrest and six-month suspension.

Phelps is entered in the 100m butterfly (Thursday), 100m backstroke and 400m freestyle (Friday) and 200m individual medley and 100m free (Saturday). He could very well scratch out of one of those events, particularly the 400m free, which was only once part of his schedule at an Olympics or World Championships (2005).

The 100m butterfly, 200m individual medley and 100m free are the key events for Phelps. Those are the three individual events that he qualified to swim at this summer’s World Championships, before his name was taken off the roster as part of his punishment for the arrest.

Phelps was the fastest man in the world in the 100m fly in 2014. The next three fastest Americans are all entered in Mesa — Tom Shields, Ryan Lochte and Tim Phillips.

Phelps was No. 3 in the world in the 200m IM in 2014. The only American faster than him is entered in Mesa — Lochte — as is the No. 3 American — Conor Dwyer.

Phelps was the No. 2 American in the 100m free in 2014. Missing from Mesa is the fastest American, Olympic champion Nathan Adrian. But Lochte and 2013 World silver medalist Jimmy Feigen are entered.

How Phelps measures up to those domestic rivals will show how well he’s trained during the competitive absence.

2. Katie Ledecky and the 100m freestyle

Ledecky is entered in every freestyle race from 100 meters through 1500 meters, plus the 400m individual medley. Like Phelps, she might opt out of events. The 400m IM appears the likeliest drop.

Nobody will challenge her in the 1500m free (Wednesday), 400m free (Friday) or 800m free (Saturday), and if she’s on form she should take the 200m free (Thursday) since Missy Franklin and the top Europeans in the event aren’t competing.

Then comes the biggest intrigue for Ledecky to close the meet Saturday night. That’s the 100m free. The last time she swam it, she beat her personal best in the preliminaries and the final in Austin, Texas, on Jan. 15.

Ledecky’s personal best in the 100m free is down to 54.55. That would have placed seventh at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials. Usually, the top six from trials make the Olympic 4x100m free relay when including preliminary swimmers.

In Mesa, she is slated to face Simone Manuel, the fastest U.S. woman in the 100m free in 2014. Manuel and Franklin are favorites to take the two individual 2016 U.S. Olympic spots in the 100m free, but Ledecky will enter the discussion if she continues to swim the event, and improve in it.

If Ledecky makes the 2016 U.S. Olympic team in the 100m, 200m, 400m and 800m frees, she could swim seven events at the Rio Olympics when including relays. No woman has won seven swimming medals at a single Olympics (only one has done so in any sport, summer or winter, Soviet gymnast Maria Gorokhovskaya in 1952).

3. Ryan Lochte and the 400m IM

In January, Lochte raced a 400m individual medley, the grueling decathlon of swimming that Phelps has sworn off, for the first time in 20 months. It did not go well.

But Lochte said then that he would definitely swim the 400m IM at his next Pro Swim Series appearance. He did not. Lochte only swam one event at the Pro Swim Series stop in Orlando, but he was a late addition to the meet due to travel issues coming back from Australia.

Lochte did not enter the 400m IM for Mesa, either. The 11-time Olympic medalist has been on and off about his future in the 400m IM since he captured gold in the event at the London Games.

In Mesa, Lochte is entered in the 100m, 200m and 400m frees, 100m backstroke, 100m fly and 200m IM. He and Phelps could go head to head in five events.

But what could be most interesting is if Lochte says whether or not the 400m IM is in his long-term plans.

4. The Swimmer of the Year

One reigning World Swimmer of the Year is also entered in Mesa. It’s not Phelps, Lochte or Ledecky. It’s Hungary’s Katinka Hosszu, the reigning World champion in the 200m and 400m individual medleys.

Hosszu entered 14 races for Mesa, which is about her norm. However, a swimmer can’t compete in more than seven in the Pro Swim Series, so she must cut down.

It surprised some when swimming’s international governing body announced Hosszu as its female Swimmer of the Year for 2014, given Ledecky was the only woman to break a world record in an individual Olympic event last year. And Ledecky did so in two events, plus in the 1500m free.

Hosszu, a three-time Olympian and 25 years old, bagged three individual gold medals at the 2014 European Championships and six medals overall. The same week she was named World Swimmer of the Year over Ledecky, she totaled eight more individual medals at the World Short Course Championships (the meet missed the top Americans and Chinese in Hosszu’s best events).

As the individual medley queen, she is the world’s best all-around female swimmer. But is she more dominant than Ledecky? That’s debatable.

She could race Ledecky in the 400m IM — if Ledecky doesn’t drop it — or any freestyle from 100m through 1500m.

Flashback: Michael Phelps at the Sydney 2000 Olympics

Justin Morneau nixes Olympic baseball qualifying return

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Justin Morneau, the 2006 AL MVP with the Minnesota Twins, was taken off Canada’s Olympic baseball qualifying roster before he would have played his first competitive game in more than two years.

Morneau, 38, experienced an unspecified setback in training and was replaced on Canada’s roster for next month’s Premier12. The global tournament marks the first opportunity for many world baseball powers to qualify for the sport’s return to the Olympics.

Morneau never played in the Olympics before baseball was cut from the Games after 2008; active MLB players have never competed in the Games. But he was on Canada’s roster at all four World Baseball Classics from 2006 through 2017.

At November’s Premier12, the top nation from North and South America will qualify for the Tokyo Olympics. Japan and Israel are already qualified. Those that do not qualify will get another chance next year.

Morneau could become the second Major League Baseball MVP to play Olympic baseball as a medal sport. The other was Jason Giambi, who made the U.S. team in 1992, the same summer he was drafted in the second round by the Oakland Athletics.

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MORE: Joe Girardi replaced as U.S. baseball manager by World Series champion

Kolohe Andino is first U.S. Olympic surfing qualifier; Kelly Slater faces last chance

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Kolohe Andino is the first American to qualify for surfing’s Olympic debut, which leaves one spot left for 47-year-old Kelly Slater to chase at the final contest of the season.

Andino, a 25-year-old Californian whose first name means “rascal” in Hawaiian, clinched his place in Tokyo on Friday at the penultimate stop on the World Surf League Championship Tour in Portugal. He is ranked fifth in the world, trailing a trio of Brazilians.

One more American man will join Andino on the Olympic team. It will be one of Slater, the 11-time world champion, John John Florence, the 2016 and 2017 World champion, and rising 22-year-old Hawaiian Seth Moniz.

Slater was handed a golden opportunity to qualify when Florence announced in early July that he tore an ACL for the second time in 13 months. Florence had won two of the first five events this season.

Slater has been chasing the sidelined Florence in the standings ever since. But it has not been easy.

Slater hasn’t made the quarterfinals in any of his last seven contests going into December’s finale — the prestigious Billabong Pipeline Masters on the North Shore of Oahu.

“Ninth place, to me, used to be a pretty awful result. I’m used to at least a quarterfinal on for most of my career,” he said in July, noting a back injury. “I’m not horrified by my results, but I’m also not surprised. Maybe other people are because everyone focuses on my age and that kind of thing. It’s not like I’m going to all of a sudden forget how to do this thing, you know?”

Slater, who won the Pipe Masters seven times between 1992 and 2013, must reach the quarterfinals at this year’s event to have any chance of passing Florence to qualify for the Olympics.

Complicating matters: Florence said in August it was his “goal to get better for Pipeline in case I have to come back and compete and gain points,” according to ESPN.com. If Florence does return for the December contest, and makes the quarterfinals, Slater could only pass him with a victory.

Moniz goes into the finale ranked one spot behind Slater, meaning he, too, can grab that second and final Olympic spot with a win or a runner-up.

Slater, who turns 48 on Feb. 11, would be the oldest U.S. Summer Olympic rookie competitor in a sport other than equestrian, sailing or shooting (or art competitions!) in the last 100 years, supplanting Martina Navratilova, according to the OlyMADMen.

MORE: Top U.S. surfer has links to Egg McMuffin, Guinness World Record holder

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