How U.S. Olympic women’s swim team would look based on 2015 times

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Now that the year’s biggest swim meets are finished, there’s an opportunity to compare times and rank the fastest U.S. women’s swimmers per event.

The top two swimmers per event make the U.S. Olympic team at the trials next June and July, plus likely the top six from the 100m and 200m freestyles for relays.

Before getting to the rankings, two notes:

  • Katie Ledecky is the only U.S. woman ranked No. 1 in the world in an event, for the second straight year. Though Ledecky swept the 200m, 400m and 800m World titles (and the 1500m, but that’s not an Olympic event), she is fourth fastest in the world in the 200m in 2015. Ledecky is also ranked No. 42 in the world in the 100m free (ninth among Americans).
  • Natalie Coughlin, a 12-time Olympic medalist who made the London 2012 team only in the 4x100m freestyle relay, ranks No. 2 in the 50m free, No. 3 in the 100m free and No. 1 in the 100m back, ahead of Olympic champion Missy Franklin. If Coughlin makes the Rio team and wins one medal, she will break her tie with Jenny Thompson and Dara Torres for the most Olympic medals won by an American woman.

How U.S. Olympic men’s swim team would look based on 2015 times

Here are the rankings with world ranking in parentheses.

50m Freestyle
1. Simone Manuel — 24.47 (8)
2. Natalie Coughlin — 24.66 (14)

3. Madison Kennedy — 24.71 (15)
4. Amanda Weir — 24.85 (23)

100m Freestyle
1. Missy Franklin — 53.68 (9)
2. Simone Manuel — 53.81 (10)
3. Natalie Coughlin — 53.85 (14)
4. Margo Geer — 53.95 (19)
5. Amanda Weir — 54.24 (29)
6. Allison Schmitt — 54.34 (34)

200m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 1:55.16 (4)
2. Missy Franklin — 1:55.49 (5)
3. Allison Schmitt — 1:56.23 (10)
4. Leah Smith — 1:57.52 (25)
5. Katie McLaughlin — 1:57.55 (26)
6. Melanie Margalis — 1:57.91 (33)

400m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 3:59.13 (1)
2. Leah Smith — 4:04.66 (6)

3. Lindsay Vrooman — 4:07.28 (21)
4. Hali Flickinger — 4:07.93 (25)

800m Freestyle
1. Katie Ledecky — 8:07.39 (1)
2. Becca Mann — 8:24.13 (9)

3. Leah Smith — 8:24.74 (10)
4. Lindsay Vrooman — 8:26.67 (11)

100m Backstroke
1. Natalie Coughlin — 59.05 (6)
2. Missy Franklin — 59.40 (7)

3. Claire Adams — 59.58 (9)
4. Kathleen Baker — 59.63 (11)

200m Backstroke
1. Missy Franklin — 2:06.34 (3)
2. Maya DiRado — 2:08.50 (10)

3. Lisa Bratton — 2:09.31 (14)
4. Claire Adams — 2:09.44 (17)

100m Breaststroke
1. Katie Meili — 1:05.64 (3)
2. Jessica Hardy — 1:06.68 (7)

3. Lily King — 1:06.69 (8)
4. Breeja Larson — 1:07.33 (22)

200m Breaststroke
1. Micah Lawrence — 2:22.04 (4)
2. Laura Sogar — 2:23.54 (14)

3. Molly Hannis — 2:25.57 (27)
4. Annie Lazor — 2:26.23 (31)

100m Butterfly
1. Kelsi Worrell — 57.24 (3)
2. Katie McLaughlin — 57.87 (14)

3. Kendyl Stewart — 58.05 (17)
4. Felicia Lee — 58.54 (34)

200m Butterfly
1. Cammile Adams — 2:06.40 (5)
2. Katie McLaughlin — 2:06.95 (8)

3. Hali Flickinger — 2:07.59 (10)
4. Cassidy Bayer — 2:08.03 (17)

200m Individual Medley
1. Maya DiRado — 2:08.99 (4)
2. Melanie Margalis — 2:10.26 (7)

3. Caitlin Leverenz — 2:10.51 (8)
4. Madisyn Cox — 2:10.75 (9)

400m Individual Medley
1. Maya DiRado — 4:31.71 (2)
2. Caitlin Leverenz — 4:35.46 (6)

3. Elizabeth Beisel — 4:36.71 (11)
4. Sarah Henry — 4:38.88 (21)

How Katie Ledecky can be an underdog at the Rio Olympics

2026 Winter Olympic host: Milan-Cortina

Milan-Cortina 2026
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Italy will host the 2026 Winter Olympics and Paralympics, with Milan-Cortina winning an IOC vote over a Swedish-Latvian bid centered on Stockholm.

After Winter Games in Vancouver (2010), Sochi (2014), PyeongChang (2018) and Beijing (2022), they return to a traditional European site for the first time since Italy hosted in Torino in 2006.

The two bids were left after five others dropped out for various reasons, all in 2018: Calgary, Canada; Erzurum, Turkey; Sapporo, Japan; Graz, Austria and Sion, Switzerland.

With the 2024 and 2028 Summer Games hosts both decided two years ago (Paris for 2024, Los Angeles for 2028), next up is the 2030 Winter Games. The U.S. has already said that if it bids, it will be with Salt Lake City, which held the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Italy will host the Winter Games for a third time after Cortina d’Ampezzo in 1956 and Torino in 2006.

Its bid presentation Monday included all three Italian 2018 Olympic champions — Arianna Fontana (short track), Michela Moioli (snowboard cross) and Sofia Goggia (downhill). The presentation ended with 15-year-old short track speed skater Elisa Confortola addressing more than 80 IOC members.

Sweden has finished second or third in all seven of its Winter Olympic bid votes, including six straight from 1984 through 2002, according to the OlyMADMen. The Stockholm–Åre bid was trying to become the first Winter Games held in multiple countries, with Latvia holding bobsled, luge and skeleton.

MORE: Tokyo 2020 Olympic master schedule

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Japan’s gymnastics worlds team: no Kohei Uchimura, Kenzo Shirai

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Not only is Kohei Uchimura going to miss the world championships, but so is 11-time world medalist Kenzo Shirai.

Japan finalized its five-man team for October’s worlds in Stuttgart, Germany, following a national-level meet this past weekend. Uchimura, arguably the greatest gymnast in history, was already out of the running, sidelined with his latest round of injuries.

Shirai, reportedly slowed by a left ankle injury this season, did compete this weekend. But he finished fifth on floor exercise and third on vault, his two best events, and did not earn one of the last two spots on the world team.

Uchimura, a two-time Olympic all-around champion with six world all-around titles, misses worlds for the first time since 2007. Shirai, a 22-year-old with four world titles between floor and vault, had competed in every worlds since debuting in 2013, just after his 17th birthday.

Without their two stars, Japan sends a relatively inexperienced team. Kazuma Kaya and Wataru Tanigawa, both 22, are the only men who have been to a worlds (and were part of the 2018 silver-medal team). The youngest member is 17-year-old Daiki Hashimoto.

Japan has earned a team medal at every Olympics and world championships since 2003, a streak bettered only by the U.S. women.

MORE: Olympic gymnastics team sizes return to five for Paris 2024

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