Five Olympic questions with Abby Wambach

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Abby Wambach‘s back from a well-earned vacation the first two weeks of August, which means she’ll return to being asked more questions about the Rio Olympics.

Will she or won’t she play one more year has been the talk since Wambach won her first World Cup with the U.S. on July 5.

She is undecided but ready for the challenge that awaits should she continue on at age 35. While Wambach mulls that, she answered other Olympic questions shortly before embarking on that two-week break earlier this month.

OlympicTalk: You weren’t on the Sydney 2000 Olympic team [during your junior year at the University of Florida], but while you were at UF, was the possibility of trying to make that team ever on your mind?

Wambach: I didn’t know if it was a possibility, to be honest.

OlympicTalk: Are there any parellels that can be drawn to your situation now from the lead-up to the Athens 2004 Olympics, when Julie Foudy, Joy Fawcett and Mia Hamm announced they would retire following those Games?

Wambach: Sure, I bet there are a lot of familiarities. I’m sure that what I’m feeling right now, in terms of the exhaustion and running around and everything, is what they kind of were dealing with. I was just a young kid on the block at that point [in 2004]. So I’m lucky and honored, to be quite honest, to be able to be in a position to represent my country and having another opportunity to represent my country. If I could it, that would be great, but I still haven’t made that decision.

OlympicTalk: You broke your left leg in July 2008 and missed the Beijing Olympics. Did you watch the gold-medal game, and if so, from where did you watch it?

Wambach: I watched the final on crutches in a vacation spot, where my family always vacations at. It was horrible, but also really inspiring to see my teammates rise, even though one of their leading goal scorers and one of their leaders had been knocked down just before those Games. It was really inspiring to see them still persevere and win gold, even though I wasn’t there.

OlympicTalk: If the Olympic roster size was not 18 players but instead 23 players, like it is for the World Cup, would that play any difference in the decision you’ll make for 2016?

Wambach: No. I just know that there’s a lot that needs to happen between now and then. I just have to make the right decision for myself. I know that I’m confident in my skill as a player. I just want to make sure that I have what it takes to play in the tournament, if I can help my team win an Olympic gold medal.

OlympicTalk: Could you skip the Olympic qualifying tournament [in February in Texas] and also want to play in the Olympics, or would you want to do both?

Wambach: I would never do that [skip the qualifying tournament and still want to play in Rio]. That’s not who I am. If I’m in, I’m all-in. If I were to not play in the qualifying tournament [and still want to play in Rio], it would only be because of injury.

Predicting U.S. Olympic women’s soccer roster based off World Cup