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Meryl Davis, Charlie White wait for right feeling for possible return

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NEW YORK — When Meryl Davis sees that photo, that tight feeling returns.

The picture, taken by a U.S. Figure Skating team leader, captured Davis and ice dance partner Charlie White, as they waited in between a warm-up and one of their programs at the Iceberg Skating Palace at the Sochi Olympics.

Davis and White haven’t competed since becoming the first U.S. Olympic ice dance champions on Feb. 17, 2014. They’ve continued to skate in the 603 days since, in shows and at events such as the opening of The Rink at Rockefeller Center on Tuesday morning.

How often do they think about returning to competition?

“Only when you guys [the media] are asking,” White said Tuesday. “I don’t mean to be flippant. I literally don’t think about it.”

But they feel it, such as the nervousness as spectators inside the Shanghai Sports Center on March 25, watching their former peers perform the World Championships short dance.

“We still felt really invested in the competition,” Davis said.

Or when Davis comes across that picture from Sochi.

White, too, remembers that tight feeling just before the biggest competition of their lives.

“Full-on, you’re thinking to yourself like, if I run away right now, how mad will everyone be,” said White, seated to the left of Davis, his ice dance partner of nearly 20 years, at the Rock Center Café on Tuesday afternoon. “You’re so terrified because of what the moment represents. You can’t escape it. It’s like the Eye of Sauron [from “Lord of the Rings”].”

Davis and White announced in March what many suspected, that they would not compete in the 2015-16 season.

The decision came easily.

“It wasn’t, like, an answer we had to search for,” White said Tuesday. “It wasn’t something where we had to sit down and even have a conversation. We just knew.”

Their stance about the future has not changed. Davis and White are open to returning, if the feeling is right.

“We’re just not on that clock right now, and it’s really nice,” Davis said. “I think we’ll just wait for it to just pop up one day. We’ll just wait for an epiphany.”

White said they will sense it together, if and when it comes.

“The feeling that we need to have to be able to get onto the ice and push through that brick wall every single day,” he said, joking that feeling occured about 15 times per day leading into Sochi but now passes about once every 20 days.

What’s clear is that Davis and White would not leave a run for their third Olympics to the last minute.

White said they would probably have to return no later than halfway through the 2016-17 season if the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Games are their target.

Many athletes say they would need a full season of competition going into an Olympic year, but that’s not a requirement for Davis and White.

“Especially with the fact that we’re still skating, we’re still in front of people, we’ve skated together for 20 years,” White said. “Our speed, our power, explosion, it’s not going anywhere for 10 years.”

White, who turns 28 on Oct. 24, then paused and chuckled.

“Maybe seven years,” he said.

Longtime training partners and Canadian rivals Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the Vancouver 2010 gold medalists and Sochi silver medalists, also haven’t competed since the Olympics. They reportedly plan to decide if they’ll come back before the 2016-17 season.

Ice dance evolved during the couples’ break. In Shanghai, France’s Gabriella Papadakis, then 19, and Guillaume Cizeron, then 20, became the youngest World champions in the event in 40 years.

Davis and White watched the Worlds free dance on March 27 on a tablet while in a car en route to a hotel. They saw Papadakis and Cizeron jump from fourth after the short dance to first to supplant U.S. Olympians Madison Chock and Evan Bates.

“We’re not that far removed from being out there with them,” White said.

MORE FIGURE SKATING: Japan Open sees return of one star, rise of another to ignite figure skating season

Kitzbuehel hosts Hahnenkamm weekend; Mikaela Shiffrin speeds up; Alpine World Cup TV, live stream info

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The world’s most daring Alpine skiers descend the most famous annual race this weekend, while Mikaela Shiffrin tackles her own challenge, live on NBC Sports.

The men’s World Cup stops in Kitzbuehel, Austria, for the Hahnenkamm. The granddaddy is Saturday’s downhill, sandwiched between Friday’s super-G and Sunday’s slalom.

Arnold Schwarzenegger has been among the celebrity attendees in the finish area. Lindsey Vonn will be on hand this weekend, inspecting the course.

The Streif downhill track is a two-minute, two-mile test of guts: a 3,000-foot drop at an average 65 miles per hour (and maxing out much faster than that). Crashes are commonplace. A helicopter is at the ready to airlift skiers to the nearest hospital.

“You go into the starting gate, and it’s intimidating,” said American Ryan Cochran-Siegle, who makes his Kitzbuehel downhill debut on Saturday. “You don’t really know how it’s going to go. You think it’s just going to be kind of chaos.”

Cochran-Siegle, whose uncle Bob Cochran was the first American to earn a World Cup podium in the race in 1973, used two words to describe the Streif: fun … and fear.

The only American to win the Hahnenkamm downhill was Daron Rahlves in 2003. The last podium finisher was Bode Miller in 2014. The best U.S. finish the last four years was 10th.

Bryce Bennett took confidence from finishing seventh at a World Cup downhill in Wengen, Switzerland, last Saturday. That’s the best U.S. downhill finish this season outside of the home snow of Beaver Creek, Colo.

“Team morale is good, and it’s been great all season long,” said Steven Nyman, who was fifth in 2015. “We’re looking for those top-tier performances. Bryce’s seventh is a good step forward. We all know we can ski well, and it’s cool as a team we’re pushing toward the top, but we’re not there yet.”

Over in Bansko, Bulgaria, Shiffrin is expected to race downhills Friday and Saturday and a super-G on Sunday. They would mark the slalom ace’s first downhills outside of Lake Louise and Cortina d’Ampezzo, which she’s contested a combined 10 times.

Shiffrin made the podium of her last super-G in St. Moritz and her last downhill in Lake Louise, both in December. She’s coming off surprising results in slaloms and giant slaloms, not having won in her last five starts overall.

Still, Shiffrin leads the World Cup overall standings by a substantial 199 points with a tour-leading four outright victories this season.

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MORE: Alpine skiing season TV schedule

Day Time (ET) Event Network
Friday 3:30 a.m. Women’s Downhill Olympic Channel | NBC Sports Gold
5:30 a.m. Men’s Super-G NBC Sports Gold
Saturday 3:30 a.m. Women’s Downhill Olympic Channel | NBC Sports Gold
5:30 a.m. Men’s Downhill NBC Sports Gold
9 a.m.* Women’s Downhill NBCSN
Sunday 3:30 a.m. Women’s Super-G Olympic Channel | NBC Sports Gold
4:30 a.m. Men’s Slalom Run 1 NBC Sports Gold
7:30 a.m. Men’s Slalom Run 2 NBC Sports Gold
12:30 p.m.* Women’s Super-G NBCSN
Monday 1 p.m.* Kitzbuehel Highlights NBCSN

*Delayed broadcast

Maya Moore withdraws from Olympic consideration

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Maya Moore, the U.S. second-leading scorer at the Rio Olympics, withdrew her name from Tokyo Olympic consideration and will skip a second straight WNBA season.

Moore is on hiatus from competitive basketball to focus on criminal justice reform. Specifically, the case of a man who was sentenced to 50 years in prison but Moore believes is innocent, according to The New York Times.

USA Basketball confirmed Wednesday’s Times report that Moore took her name out of consideration for the 12-player Tokyo Olympic team, which is expected to be named in late spring or early summer.

“We are going to miss Maya tremendously, but we also respect her decision,” U.S. women’s national team director Carol Callan said, according to the report. “A player of Maya’s ability does not walk away from the gym lightly. Everyone feels it. The thing that makes her so special is her approach, her dedication, which has always been contagious for our team.”

Moore last played for the U.S. in major competition at the Rio Olympics. She was one of the leaders on a team that earned a sixth straight gold medal. Moore started all eight games and averaged 12 points per game, second on the team behind fellow former University of Connecticut star Diana Taurasi.

Breanna Stewart, another former UConn standout, entered the starting lineup at the 2018 FIBA World Cup in Moore’s absence and earned tournament MVP. Stewart is returning after missing the entire 2019 WNBA season with an Achilles tear.

Moore also started five games at the 2012 London Olympics as the team’s youngest player.

Moore, 30, said “this is not the time” to retire, according to the Times, but it’s unknown when she might return to the national team or to the WNBA, where she won four titles and an MVP with the Minnesota Lynx from 2011-18.

“I got to experience the best of my craft, and I did that multiple times,” Moore said, according to the report. “There is nothing more I wish I could experience.”

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