Brittany Bowe breaks 1500m world record

AP
0 Comments

Brittany Bowe broke the longest-standing Olympic speed skating event world record on Sunday, taking the 1500m crown at the season-opening World Cup in Calgary.

The U.S. Olympian clocked 1 minute, 51.59 seconds, beating the time set by Canadian Cindy Klassen on Nov. 20, 2005, by two tenths of a second.

“Cindy’s a legend, and she’s in a class of her own, so it’s quite an honor,” Bowe told Dutch broadcaster NOS of Klassen, the most decorated athlete at the Torino 2006 Olympics with five medals.

Bowe’s time is three tenths of a second slower than Norwegian legend Johann Olav Koss‘ winning time in the men’s 1500m at the Lillehammer 1994 Olympics, which was then a world record before the clap-skate era.

Bowe went under her own personal best by .86 of a second, one day after she rebroke her 1000m world record but saw countrywoman Heather Richardson take it away in the next pair.

“It was a tough second place yesterday … so I was really determined to get that back today,” Bowe told NOS.

Bowe, a 27-year-old former Florida Atlantic point guard, is the reigning World Sprint champion, which combines finishes in 500m and 1000m races on consecutive days.

She’s also the World champion in the individual 1000m and 1500m distances.

Those titles came one year after Bowe made her Olympic debut in Sochi with a best individual finish of eighth place as the whole U.S. speed skating team struggled.

Also Sunday, Russian Pavel Kulizhnikov won a men’s 500m in 34.00 seconds, breaking Canadian Jeremy Wotherspoon‘s world record of 34.03 set Nov. 9, 2007.

Full results from a weekend of competition in Calgary are here.

The World Cup speed skating season continues next week at another fast oval known for world-record times, the 2002 Olympic venue in Kearns, Utah.

MORE: Figure skating event canceled in Bordeaux after Paris attacks

Yalemzerf Yehualaw, Amos Kipruto win London Marathon

Yalemzerf Yehualaw
Getty
0 Comments

Ethiopian Yalemzerf Yehualaw became the youngest female runner to win the London Marathon, while Kenyan Amos Kipruto earned the biggest victory of his career in the men’s race.

Yehualaw, 23, clocked 2:17:26, prevailing by 41 seconds over 2021 London champ Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya.

Yehualaw tripped and fell over a speed bump around the 20-mile mark. She quickly rejoined the lead pack, then pulled away from Jepkosgei by running the 24th mile in a reported 4:43, which converts to 2:03:30 marathon pace; the women’s world record is 2:14:04.

Yehualaw and Jepkosgei were pre-race favorites after world record holder Brigid Kosgei of Kenya withdrew Monday with a right hamstring injury.

On April 24, Yehualaw ran the fastest women’s debut marathon in history, a 2:17:23 to win in Hamburg, Germany.

She has joined the elite tier of female marathoners, a group led by Kenyan Peres Jepchirchir, the reigning Olympic, New York City and Boston champion. Another Ethiopian staked a claim last week when Tigist Assefa won Berlin in 2:15:37, shattering Yehualaw’s national record.

Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion in 1984, finished in 3:20:20 at age 65.

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Kipruto, 30, won the men’s race in 2:04:39. He broke free from the leading group in the 25th mile and crossed the finish line 33 seconds ahead of Ethiopian Leul Gebresilase.

Kipruto, one of the pre-race favorites, had never won a major marathon but did finish second behind world record holder Eliud Kipchoge in Tokyo (2022) and Berlin (2018) and third at the world championships (2019) and Tokyo (2018).

Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele, the second-fastest marathoner in history, was fifth after being dropped in the 21st mile. His 2:05:53 was the fastest-ever marathon by a runner 40 years or older. Bekele ran his personal best at the 2019 Berlin Marathon — 2:01:41 — and has not run within four minutes of that time since.

The major marathon season continues next Sunday with the Chicago Marathon, headlined by a women’s field that includes Kenyan Ruth Chepngetich and American Emily Sisson.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

2022 London Marathon Results

2022 London Marathon
Getty
0 Comments

2022 London Marathon top-10 results and notable finishers from men’s and women’s elite and wheelchair races. Full searchable results are here. ..

Men’s Elite
1. Amos Kipruto (KEN) — 2:04:39
2. Leul Gebresilase (ETH) — 2:05:12
3. Bashir Abdi (BEL) — 2:05:19
4. Kinde Atanaw (ETH) — 2:05:27
5. Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) — 2:05:53
6. Birhanu Legese (ETH) — 2:06:11
7. Sisay Lemma (ETH) — 2:07:26
8. Brett Robinson (AUS) — 2:09:52
9. Weynay Ghebresilasie (GBR) — 2:11:57
10. Philip Sesemann (GBR) — 2:12:10
DNS. Mo Farah (GBR)

Women’s Elite
1. Yalemzerf Yehualaw (ETH) — 2:17:26
2. Joyciline Jepkosgei (KEN) — 2:18:07
3. Alemu Megertu (ETH) — 2:18:32
4. Judith Korir (KEN) — 2:18:43
5. Joan Melly (ROU) — 2:19:27
6. Ashete Bekere (ETH) — 2:19:30
7. Mary Ngugi (KEN) — 2:20:22
8. Sutume Kebede (ETH) — 2:20:44
9. Ai Hosoda (JPN) — 2:21:42
10. Rose Harvey (GBR) — 2:27:59
Joan Benoit Samuelson (USA, 1984 Olympic champion) — 3:20:20
DNS. Brigid Kosgei (KEN)

Men’s Wheelchair
1. Marcel Hug (SUI) — 1:24:38
2. Daniel Romanchuk (USA) — 1:24:40
3. David Weir (GBR) — 1:30:41
4. Tomoki Suzuki (JPN) — 1:30:41
5. Jetze Plat (NED) — 1:30:44
6. Aaron Pike (USA) — 1:33:05
7. Sho Watanabe (JPN) — 1:34:16
8. Jake Lappin (USA) — 1:34:16
9. Patrick Monahan (IRL) — 1:34:16
10. Johnboy Smith (GBR) — 1:34:17

Women’s Wheelchair
1. Catherine Debrunner (SUI) — 1:38:24
2. Susannah Scaroni (USA) — 1:42:21
3. Eden Rainbow-Cooper (GBR) — 1:47:27
4. Merle Menje (GER) — 1:47:28
5. Jenna Fesemyer (USA) — 1:47:28
6. Wakako Tsuchida (JPN) — 1:47:28
7. Vanessa De Souza (BRA) — 1:47:29
8. Yen Hoang (USA) — 1:47:29
9. Aline Rocha (BRA) — 1:47:32
10. Christie Dawes (GBR) — 1:47:33

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!