Vashti, Randall Cunningham make their own names in high jump

Randall, Vashti Cunningham
USATF (2014)
1 Comment

On Aug. 1, a tall, slender high school senior broke the American junior record in the women’s high jump, clearing a height that would have made the 2012 Olympic team.

Her behind barely grazed the bar, not nearly enough to scare it out of place. She leaped out of the landing pit with her right arm raised.

She composed as she walked out of the competition area, fixing her hair as she crossed eight running lanes and stepped onto grass on the track’s perimeter.

There, standing on the other side of a white, four-foot fence, were two men who share a name.

Vashti Cunningham exchanged words with her coach, Randall Cunningham, the longtime NFL quarterback, and a handshake with her older brother, Randall Cunningham, a USC sophomore who specializes in the same field event.

The Cunninghams swept the high jumps at the Pan American Junior Championships in Edmonton in August. It marked another step toward the family’s goal of having two Cunninghams on the 2016 U.S. Olympic team.

“When my kids came out, and I saw how tall they were going to be, I just really believed that they could get it done,” Randall Sr. said.

Vashti, named after the strong-willed queen from the Book of Esther, had the two best clearances of any U.S. female high jumper in 2015 — that record-breaking 1.96-meter (or 6 feet, 5 inches) jump, plus a 1.94-meter jump in April.

She is 6 feet, 1 inch and 122 pounds.

Randall II, named after the senior pastor at Las Vegas’ Remnant Ministries, cleared a personal-best 2.26 meters last week. That would have ranked 12th among U.S. men last year. Third in the U.S. in 2015 was 2.31 meters (remember, top three at the Olympic trials are in line to make Rio).

He is 6 feet, 6 inches, two inches taller than his dad.

Randall Sr. coached both kids for about six years until Randall II enrolled at USC in 2014 and joined the Trojans track team. He’s still the primary coach for Vashti, who may follow Randall II to USC, if she doesn’t choose Georgia, Oregon or turn professional.

Randall Sr. has high jumping experience, too.

On page 46 of the 1981 Santa Barbara (Calif.) High School yearbook is a black-and-white image of a high-socks-wearing high jumper, his arms outstretched clearing the bar with palm trees in the background.

“Oh my gosh, I was so skinny,” Randall Sr. laughs, recalling the photo. “It’s one of the things that I cherish.”

Randall Sr. cleared 6 feet, 10 inches, without the aid of coaching or lifting weights, competing in track to help stay in shape for football. The athlete later dubbed “The Ultimate Weapon” by Sports Illustrated said he dunked in ninth grade and could have done the decathlon.

His high jump career ended his senior year at Santa Barbara, when he needed knee surgery to alleviate muscle growing too fast for his bones.

Randall Cunningham
Courtesy Santa Barbara High School

He continued playing football, his star rising at UNLV and then with the Philadelphia Eagles during a 16-year NFL career through 2001.

Vashti and Randall II played other sports well enough to earn recruiting attention, Vashti in volleyball and Randall II as a quarterback. But both are focusing solely on the high jump now.

“We wanted them to follow in the footsteps of our family,” said Randall Sr., whose wife, Felicity, is a former ballet dancer. “I really wanted to focus on the high jump because my kids were tall, and I knew that I knew how to train them. 

“I’m trying to get my kids to that point where they’ll be pros very quickly.”

What are their chances of making the Olympic team?

No U.S. woman other than Vashti cleared a qualifying height last year to compete at August’s World Championships.

And since Vashti opted to stick to junior-level competition last summer and not enter the senior U.S. Outdoor Championships, she didn’t go to Worlds, either.

“I was taking smaller steps,” Vashti said.

Three-time Olympian Chaunté Lowe accepted an invitation to compete at August’s Worlds but missed all three of her attempts at 1.80 meters in Beijing.

It marked the first time no U.S. women’s high jumper cleared a height at an Olympics or Worlds since the Helsinki 1952 Games, when no U.S. women competed (excluding the boycotted Moscow 1980 Olympics).

If Lowe and Olympic silver medalist Brigetta Barrett (who sat out 2015 due to hip surgery) can’t regain their best form, Vashti may enter the Olympic trials in July as the favorite.

The top three at trials in Eugene, Ore., make the Olympic team, so long as they meet the Olympic qualifying standard of 1.93 meters.

Vashti began high jumping at about 9 years old, starting out doing the sprint hurdles and long jump, too.

“I was better than my other events in high jump,” she said. “And my dad was coaching high jump, so I just went where he was.”

She’s moved past being “frazzled” at her high school state championships last spring. After all the other jumpers had gone, she moved the bar up to 5 feet, 10 inches, for her first jump (1.77 meters). She knocked the bar off on all three attempts and ceded the title to a girl who cleared 5 feet, 3 inches.

“I’d like to sign [professionally] now, and my dad would like me to sign now, too, make the Olympics and be on the podium, first, second or third,” said Vashti, who turned 18 last week. “But I would really like to be first.”

Randall II faces more competition.

Olympic silver medalist Erik Kynard has been untouchable domestically since London, clearing 2.37 meters each of the last three years. Several others have eclipsed 2.30 meters or better.

Randall II must clear 2.28 meters by June 27 to automatically qualify for the trials. He could still make the trials field without it. Nobody cleared better than 2.28 meters at the 2012 Olympic trials.

Randall II grew up sprinting and long jumping, and playing quarterback, of course. He began high jumping at his father’s urging in middle school.

“In Vegas, where we’re from, nobody high jumps,” he said. “We would go to the meets, and the pits won’t even be out. I had never seen anybody high jump.”

Randall II says he keeps his father as “a mental coach” while on the USC team. They talk on the phone the night before NCAA competitions.

“He has the ability to jump 7-8, even this year [2.33 meters],” Randall Sr. said. “There’s a road of success in front of both of them.”

In coaching, Randall Sr. absorbs the event like a sponge studying video of the greats — such as two-time U.S. Olympic medalist Dwight Stones and two-time World champion Blanka Vlasic of Croatia, among others.

Now, he has a club team of dozens of track and field athletes. A meet bears his name.

“I’ve learned a lot. I do know a lot about high jump,” he said. “I know a lot about the body, but more so I know the mental aspect of competing in a difficult situation, when there’s a lot of pressure. … That has really allowed me to go to another level.”

MORE: Christian Taylor looks to shoes for triple jump goals

Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
Getty
0 Comments

Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed in the final miles, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in an unprecedented 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

“I was planning to go through it [the halfway mark] 60:50, 60:40,” Kipchoge said. “My legs were running actually very fast. I thought, let me just try to run two hours flat, but all in all, I am happy with the performance.

“We went too fast [in the first half]. It takes energy from the muscles. … There’s still more in my legs [to possibly lower the record again].”

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history for somebody who ran one prior marathon in 2:34:01. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48. D’Amato, who went nearly a decade between competitive races after college, owns the American record of 2:19:12 and now also the 10th-best time in U.S. history.

“Today wasn’t my best day ever, but it was the best I could do today,” she said in a text message, according to Race Results Weekly, adding that she briefly stopped and walked late in the race.

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago.

The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, clocking 1:59:40 in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

Kipchoge grew up on a farm in Kapsabet in Kenya’s Rift Valley, often hauling by bike several gallons of the family’s milk to sell at the local market. Raised by a nursery school teacher, he ran more than three miles to and from school. He saved for five months to get his first pair of running shoes.

At 18, he upset legends Hicham El Guerrouj and Kenenisa Bekele to win the 2003 World 5000m title on the track. He won Olympic 5000m medals (bronze in 2004 and silver in 2008), then moved to the marathon after failing to make the 2012 Olympic team on the track.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
Getty
0 Comments

The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France 74, Mali 59 Group B
4 a.m. Australia 69, Serbia 54 Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada 70, Japan 56 Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final