Jessica Ennis-Hill hopeful new injury won’t keep her out of Rio Olympics

Jessica Ennis-Hill
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Olympic and World heptathlon champion Jessica Ennis-Hill has an Achilles injury and will miss the winter indoor track season but is hopeful it won’t impact trying to repeat as gold medalist at the Rio Games.

Asked by Sky Sports if the injury could put her Rio participation in question, she reportedly said:

“At this stage I’m hoping that’s not the case. We’re still in February, there’s a lot of time before the Olympics.”

Ennis-Hill, 30, won the World Championship on Aug. 23, capping a comeback after taking all of 2014 off to have a baby.

In Rio, she can become the oldest Olympic heptathlon champion. The event was added to the Olympic program in 1984, and one other woman, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, has won multiple Olympic heptathlons.

Ennis-Hill’s main rivals are younger than her — Worlds silver medalist Brianne Theisen-Eaton of Canada (27), who in May scored higher than Ennis-Hill’s Worlds total, and countrywoman Katarina Johnson-Thompson (23).

“I know the warning signs with the Achilles now, I know when it’s starting to stiffen up, and when it’s becoming sore that there’s potentially a problem there,” Ennis-Hill reportedly told Sky Sports. “Just in training it was stiffening up a little bit and becoming a bit aggravated.”

Ennis-Hill called it “precautionary rest.”

“I’ve had some scans, I’m going to sit down and discuss options with my medical team,” she said, according to Sky Sports. “I just want to get to the cause of the problem. I’ve got a lot of faith in my medical team and I’m hoping taking a step back and resting at this stage will not hinder my performances going into Rio.”

MORE: Rio 2016 Six Months Out Package

2023 French Open women’s singles draw, scores

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At the French Open, Iga Swiatek of Poland eyes a third title at Roland Garros and a fourth Grand Slam singles crown overall.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Swiatek, the No. 1 seed from Poland, can join Serena Williams and Justine Henin as the lone women to win three or more French Opens since 2000.

Turning 22 during the tournament, she can become the youngest woman to win three French Opens since Monica Seles in 1992 and the youngest woman to win four Slams overall since Williams in 2002.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Men’s Draw

But Swiatek is not as dominant as in 2022, when she went 16-0 in the spring clay season during an overall 37-match win streak.

She retired from her most recent match with a right thigh injury last week and said it wasn’t serious. Before that, she lost the final of another clay-court tournament to Australian Open champion Aryna Sabalenka of Belarus.

Sabalenka, the No. 2 seed, and Elena Rybakina of Kazakhstan, the No. 4 seed and Wimbledon champion, are the top challengers in Paris.

No. 3 Jessica Pegula and No. 6 Coco Gauff, runner-up to Swiatek last year, are the best hopes to become the first American to win a Grand Slam singles title since Sofia Kenin at the 2020 Australian Open. The 11-major drought is the longest for U.S. women since Seles won the 1996 Australian Open.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Women’s Singles Draw

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2023 French Open men’s singles draw, scores

French Open Men's Draw
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The French Open men’s singles draw is missing injured 14-time champion Rafael Nadal for the first time since 2004, leaving the Coupe des Mousquetaires ripe for the taking.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Novak Djokovic is not only bidding for a third crown at Roland Garros, but also to lift a 23rd Grand Slam singles trophy to break his tie with Nadal for the most in men’s history.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Women’s Draw

But the No. 1 seed is Spaniard Carlos Alcaraz, who won last year’s U.S. Open to become, at 19, the youngest man to win a major since Nadal’s first French Open title in 2005.

Now Alcaraz looks to become the second-youngest man to win at Roland Garros since 1989, after Nadal of course.

Alcaraz missed the Australian Open in January due to a right leg injury, but since went 30-3 with four titles. Notably, he has not faced Djokovic this year. They could meet in the semifinals.

Russian Daniil Medvedev, who lost in the French Open first round in 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020, is improved on clay. He won the Italian Open, the last top-level clay event before the French Open, and is the No. 2 seed ahead of Djokovic.

No. 9 Taylor Fritz, No. 12 Frances Tiafoe and No. 16 Tommy Paul are the highest-seeded Americans, all looking to become the first U.S. man to make the French Open quarterfinals since Andre Agassi in 2003. Since then, five different American men combined to make the fourth round on eight occasions.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Men’s Singles Draw

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