Mallory Pugh
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Mallory Pugh could become second-youngest U.S. Olympic women’s soccer player ever

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HOUSTON (AP) — For a moment, Mallory Pugh‘s eyes widened.

The U.S. national team had just qualified for the Olympics, and the 17-year-old player now faced cameras and questions. But Pugh, still months away from college, seems an old hand in many ways when it comes to poise.

The Americans assured their spot for this summer’s Rio de Janeiro Games on Friday night with a 5-0 victory over Trinidad and Tobago in the semifinals of the CONCACAF qualifying tournament. Pugh started and assisted on Tobin Heath‘s goal in the 12th minute.

“I think it’s a really cool and awesome opportunity,” Pugh said. “I mean, not everyone gets it. And I think making the most of it when it comes is really cool.”

She is the youngest in a youth movement and could become the second-youngest U.S. Olympic soccer player since 1904, according to sports-reference.com. She would be just younger than Cindy Parlow was at the first Olympics with women’s soccer in 1996.

The average age of the qualifying team is 25, down from the 29.5-year average of the team that won the World Cup in Canada last summer.

Eight of the players on the 20-player roster for this tournament had fewer than nine appearances with the senior national team. Other newcomers include Lindsey Horan, 21; Crystal Dunn, 23; and Emily Sonnett, 22.

Several veterans, including Abby Wambach and Lauren Holiday, have retired from the team that beat Japan 5-2 last summer in Canada for the World Cup title. Sydney Leroux and Amy Rodriguez are expecting and won’t be available for the Olympics. Megan Rapinoe is recovering from knee surgery.

Pugh first came to the attention of U.S. coach Jill Ellis, who also serves as U.S. Soccer’s development director, when she was 14. Pugh played on the under-17 and under-20 national teams, turning heads when she captained the team that won the CONCACAF Women’s U-20 Championship last year, earning the Golden Boot award for most goals with seven.

She made her debut at the senior level in the team’s opening game of this year, scoring her first goal in a 5-0 win over Ireland in San Diego.

Pugh is the youngest player named to a U.S. qualifying roster. The Colorado native made two starts in the tournament, which wraps up Sunday when the Americans face Canada in the final. Canada earned the region’s other Olympic berth with a 3-1 victory over Costa Rica in the semifinals.

With her speed on the left flank, Pugh held her own Friday night. Ellis decided to sit Dunn, who had five goals in the Americans’ previous game, a 10-0 victory over Puerto Rico.

“I knew (Pugh) was ready, so it was looking more at what we wanted and what we wanted to see,” Ellis said. “I think part of it is, in a tournament like this, being able to utilize your depth. And we have depth in those positions.”

Carli Lloyd likes what she’ sees from Pugh.

“I think she’s got a lot of talent, she’s really fast, she’s got good pace, very smart on the ball. I think she’s got to keep grinding away, and be able to continue to keep that level for an entire game. But great tournament for her so far, and she’s got a lot of good years ahead of her.”

Pugh will continue to play for the U-20 national team – the World Cup for that level of soccer is in November. She will also keep fit for a possible spot on the final Olympic roster by training with a boys’ team back home in Colorado. Ellis can take only 18 players to Brazil.

And she’ll also get ready for her freshman year at UCLA in the fall.

“Mallory Pugh, being on the field, it was so cool,” goalkeeper Hope Solo said following the victory. “I was so proud for her to start. To be honest, she didn’t seem nervous. She just seemed excited and happy. It was good energy.”

MORE: Carli Lloyd ranks Olympic final-winning goals, World Cup hat trick

Nathan Chen calls 3 quads at Skate America ‘a given’

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When Nathan Chen won Skate America in 2017, he competed two quadruple jumps in the short program and one downgraded quad in the free skate.

When Chen won the event in 2018, he did one under-rotated quad (which was also given an edge call) in the short and three in the free.

For Skate America this weekend (Oct. 18-20, streaming live on the NBC Sports “Figure Skating Pass”), two-time and reigning world champion Chen told reporters on Monday’s media teleconference that three quads in the free skate was “a given.”

“Honestly, I don’t really know exactly,” Chen said, after admitting he gets asked this question a lot and usually ends up giving a “vague” answer. “I have ideas. I want to push three. I want to push four… As of now, I think three is a given. But beyond that, we’ll see.”

Chen completed six quads to win the free skate at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, where he ultimately finished fifth.

He’ll skate to La Boheme for the short program in Las Vegas, choreographed by Shae-Lynn Bourne, and selections from “Rocket Man” for the free skate, choreographed by Marie-France Dubreuil. Bourne is a former ice dancer and choreographs programs for many singles skaters as well as pair teams. Dubreuil is a noted former ice dancer and current dance coach, training the top teams in the world at her school in Montreal.

Chen explained that both of the choices were the choreographers’ picks, and he had to sit on the music for a day or two before committing to skating to it. Ultimately, he likes when choreographers are able to find something that they think suits him.

“I love to listen to Elton John,” Chen said. “I don’t necessarily feel as though I’m an embodiment of his character, per se. But I do feel that no matter how you listen to music there are always many ways to interpret it. The way that we’re approaching it is not necessarily that I’m trying to be Elton John but mostly that we’re trying to interpret his music and share his music.”

And compared to last season, when he was a freshman at Yale University, classes this time around are “a lot harder,” the sophomore said. In general though, he’s a lot more comfortable trying to balance both skating and his studies.

“Skating is always tough, always a challenge,” he said. “But I would say, relative to last season, skating might be a little bit on the easier side. I think classes are definitely a lot harder… You have to really grind for a long period of time or else you don’t do well.”

Luckily for Chen, Skate America is aligned with Yale’s scheduled fall break.

MORE: Figure skating season broadcast schedule

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Check out a free trial of the Figure Skating Pass during Skate America from Oct. 18-20. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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Simone Biles reveals one thing she cannot do: Wear all her medals at once

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Three days after raising the record for world championship medals to 25, Simone Biles said her career total is a bit too much to wear at once.

“I’ve worn all five of them (from one world championship) for one time, but they’re pretty heavy, so I can’t imagine 25,” Biles said Wednesday on the “Today” show.

MORE: Mother and daughter share world championship experience

Last week, Biles became the first gymnast to win five gold medals at the world championships. She and her teammates ran away with the team gold, and she won the all-around by a staggering 2.1 points. She then won the vault, balance beam and floor exercise. Only a fifth-place finish in the uneven bars kept her from a sweep.

One event that stood out for her was the ever-challenging balance beam.

“Out of all of my performances this past week, the beam performance was one of my favorites, because I did it exactly like practice, and that’s what I’ve been training to do,” Biles said. “So it definitely helped my confidence.”

GYM WORLDS: Finals Results

Biles had her breakout performance at age 18, her first year in senior competition, in the 2013 world championships with a four-medal performance, including gold in the all-around and floor exercise. In 2014, she won those events again, along with the team event and the balance beam, and added a fifth medal on the vault. She matched that performance in 2015, then switched the vault and beam in her four-gold, five-medal performance in the 2016 Olympics.

After a post-Olympic break, she returned for the 2018 world championships to win medals in all six events, including four golds and a silver on the uneven bars, historically her least successful event.

She didn’t win six medals this year, but she took five golds for the first time. This year’s championships are also special because they’re almost certainly her last, with next year’s Olympics expected to be her last major competition.

Given all that, she’ll make more of an effort to go back and watch what she did.

“Most of the time I don’t want to see it, but this world championships was one of the best out of all five of them, so I definitely wanted to see my performances, so afterward, I would go and try to find it with my coach,” Biles said.

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