Maggie Nichols
Getty Images

Gymnast Maggie Nichols has swag down to a T

Leave a comment

First, there was the Shawon-O-Meter. Now, there’s the Swag-O-Meter.

U.S. gymnast Maggie Nichols is known by her nickname, Swaggie Maggie. Her Twitter handle is @magsgotswag12. And before she competes, her father texts her, “Swag now!”

Nichols embraces the attitude.

“It fits my personality,” she said.

Nichols emerged from injuries and through an incredibly deep U.S. program to become a favorite to make the five-woman Olympic team named in July.

Nichols began doing gymnastics at age 3 and, at age 6, remembers watching Carly Patterson win the Athens 2004 Olympic all-around. During commercial breaks, she beelined to her parents’ suburban Minneapolis-St. Paul backyard and tumbled around.

By 16, Nichols finished third in the all-around at the 2014 P&G Championships and looked destined for her first Worlds team until dislocating her left kneecap the following week.

One year later, U.S. national team coordinator Martha Karolyi praised Nichols’ recovery ahead of the 2015 P&G Championships. That’s where the Swag boom occurred.

“Maggie Nichols, the biggest improvement I can see in this quadrennium is her,” Karolyi said then. “At the beginning, she was just average, new elite, two and a half, three years ago. … Of this moment, she is showing definitely world-class gymnastics.”

Nichols proved it, outscoring Olympic champions Gabby Douglas and Aly Raisman en route to the second step on the all-around podium, just below best friend Simone Biles.

Also at that meet, Associated Press gymnastics writer Will Graves coined a hashtag that inspired Nichols’ father to get creative two months later.

“I think he started it,” Nichols said of Graves. “Now it’s just kind of carried on.”

At her first Worlds in October, Nichols was the only U.S. woman chosen by Karolyi to compete on all four events in the team final. Not Biles. Not Douglas. Not Raisman. Just Swaggie Maggie.

Nichols was ineligible for the individual all-around final as she sat out uneven bars in qualifying, but her all-around score from the team final would have earned bronze in the individual competition.

“I proved my consistency and that I can hit under pressure,” said Nichols, who doesn’t plan to continue elite-level gymnastics after the Olympics, already signing with the University of Oklahoma.

Nichols’ dad came home from Worlds in Glasgow, Scotland, with an idea to create a T-shirt. Two, actually. He chose two designs and had 50 total shirts delivered in February (images below courtesy of John Nichols).

“It says Swag-O-Meter on it and has this huge [arrow] on it, breaking [the meter],” Nichols said of one design, smiling. “He’s a goof.”

There are other Swag Meter shirts out there. Even Team Maggie shirts worn by other girls at her Twin City Sisters gym and at school.

But these two are special. John surprised Nichols with them before she departed for a national team camp and the AT&T American Cup last month.

“She’s always been Swaggie Maggie,” John said. “She’s proud of that.”

Her fans are, too. There were posters held up at Bankers Life Fieldhouse at the P&G Championships in August that read, “Just Swag It” and “I Love Swaggie Maggie!”

John and Nichols’ mom, Gina, considered wearing their shirts at the American Cup in Newark, N.J., where Nichols finished second to Douglas. They opted against it, with it being Nichols’ top-level international all-around debut and the TV cameras focused on the U.S. gymnasts and their families.

Nichols said she would wear the shirts around her home, or in the gym because it would draw smiles. She wouldn’t commit to breaking one out over her leotard while at a competition.

That didn’t surprise her parents.

“I think she’s a little bit more shy,” her mom said. “She’s really humble about what she does.”

MORE: Gabby Douglas’ family Oxygen TV series premiere date set

Maggie Nichols Maggie Nichols Maggie Nichols

Maggie Nichols

Larry Nassar judge, Olympians back USOC oversight push in Congress

AP
Leave a comment

DENVER (AP) — The judge who sentenced former sports doctor Larry Nassar to prison and a group of Olympians are backing an effort to create a commission to look into the operations of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

Michigan Judge Rosemarie Aquilina joined the athletes and Colorado’s U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette in Denver on Monday to announce the planned introduction of the bipartisan bill Tuesday in the House. It mirrors one introduced in January by Colorado Republican Sen. Cory Gardner in the Senate, a standard practice in Congress. It would set up a panel of 16 people, half of them Olympians or Paralympians, with subpoena power.

Aquilina urged people to ask their congressional representatives to support the legislation and add their names as co-sponsors. Aquilina said she became involved because this wasn’t a partisan issue, but a “human thing. This is justice for everybody. Isn’t that what judges are supposed to be — about equal justice?”

“It’s troubling for me to hear that money and medals are valued more than the safety of athletes. We have to flip that script,” added Aquilina, who sentenced Nassar to what equates to life in prison. “How is it that the Olympics do not protect their athletes? That’s their company. That’s their bread and butter.”

The latest legislation to establish the commission comes six months after a congressional report in the wake of the Nassar sex-abuse case that recommended a review of the law that governs the USOC and how the USOC can use its authority to more actively protect athletes.

USOC spokesman Mark Jones said in a statement they will “continue to work constructively with both the House and the Senate to create healthy and safe environments for the American athletes we serve.”

Among the panel’s duties would be to evaluate how responsive the national governing bodies of each Olympic sports are to the athletes, and whether the U.S. Center for SafeSport has proper funding to effectively respond to any future reports of harassment and sexual assault. In addition, the panel would review the diversity of the USOC’s board members, its finances and whether it’s achieving its stated goals.

Gardner said he’s talked to former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice about serving on the panel. “That’s likely the kind of caliber that we need,” Gardner said.

Olympic champions Nancy Hogshead-Makar, BJ Bedford and Norm Bellingham, along with Paralympic gold medalist Sarah Will were among those in attendance.

“No amount of gold medals are worth putting the health and safety of our athletes at risk,” DeGette said. “When the very body that Congress created to care for our athletes becomes more concerned about winning and protecting a brand than the athletes themselves — it’s time for change.”

Rob Koehler said he believes this will be a big step forward for athletes. He’s the director general of a group called Global Athlete, which is designed to help athletes gain a more represented voice.

“It’s time to make sure there is independent oversight, that the government takes a brave leadership role, not only for the United States but as an example for other countries, that it’s no longer acceptable for sport to self-govern itself,” Koehler said. “It’s all about the athletes. We lose focus of that. This movement is about celebrating athletes’ victories, and the growth potential is there.”

MORE: ‘This is not Burger King’: Nassar request denied by Aquilina

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Luca Urlando breaks Michael Phelps butterfly record

Leave a comment

Luca Urlando, the grandson of an Italian Olympic hammer thrower, appears to be the U.S. successor to Michael Phelps in the 200m butterfly.

Urlando, 17, broke Phelps’ national 17-18 age group record in Phelps’ trademark event on Friday night, clocking 1:53.84 at a Tyr Pro Series meet in Clovis, Calif. Phelps’ mark (1:53.93) was set in 2003, when it doubled as the world record. Urlando previously broke high school age group records held by Phelps and Caeleb Dressel in 25-yard pools.

Urlando is now the third-fastest American in history in the 200m butterfly behind Phelps and Tyler Clary. He also ranks third in the world this year behind Hungarians Kristof Milak and Tamas Kenderesi.

But Urlando will not be at July’s world championships as that team was decided in 2018.

Last summer, Urlando was the highest-ranking U.S. swimmer not to make the Pan Pacific Championships team, though it was initially announced that he did make it.

Had Urlando made Pan Pacs and then swum .17 faster there than he did at nationals, he would have made the team for July’s world championships. Urlando went to Junior Pan Pacs instead last summer and did not swim faster than at nationals.

Should Urlando make the Tokyo Games, he is in line to be the youngest U.S. Olympic male swimmer since 2000, when a 15-year-old Phelps made his Olympic debut.

His grandfather, Giampaolo Urlando, threw the hammer for Italy at the 1976, 1980 and 1984 Olympics with a best finish of seventh. He originally was fourth at Los Angeles 1984 before being disqualified for testosterone.

Luca’s father, Alessandro Urlando, holds the University of Georgia school record in the discus. Luca, a rising Sacramento high school senior, is committed to Georgia.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Australian ‘Missile’ retires from swimming