Kobe Bryant
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Kobe Bryant almost made 2000 Olympic team

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One day after Kobe Bryant‘s breakout performance in the 2000 NBA Finals, it looked like a path opened for him to be named to the Sydney Olympic team.

On June 14, 2000, Bryant scored 28 points in Game 4 of the Finals against the Indiana Pacers, a 120-118 overtime victory.

Bryant rose to the occasion that night in what could be considered his star turn, after missing the second half of Game 2 and all of Game 3 with an ankle injury.

Shaquille O’Neal fouled out in overtime of Game 4, and Bryant took over as the team leader, including scoring the game-clinching basket.

The next day, Grant Hill said he would cede his spot on the 12-man U.S. Olympic roster due to his own ankle injury.

“It was tacitly acknowledged that Bryant was the top choice” to replace him in a USA Basketball conference call that day, according to the Associated Press. Bryant and Eddie Jones were named as possibilities by then-USA Basketball president Russ Granik.

Hill agreed on Bryant.

From the AP:

Asked if he knew who would replace him, Hill, still on crutches and wearing a walking boot to protect his ankle, said, “I don’t know. I think maybe Kobe Bryant, but I’m not sure.”

But three days after that, Bryant said he was “leaning toward not going” to Sydney if asked.

“There’s a lot I’d like to do this summer, spend time with my family, get married, relax,” Bryant said, according to the AP. “I haven’t given it that much thought, really. I’ll give it some more thought after the season.”

Then on July 17, it was made official.

Hill’s place was given to Shareef Abdur-Rahim, a forward who also had a wedding planned that summer ahead of the Olympics, which were held in the last two weeks of September.

If Bryant had made the Sydney Olympic team, he would have been (then) the youngest U.S. Olympic basketball player in the Dream Team era at 22 years old.

Anthony Davis, a 19-year-old in 2012, now holds that distinction.

Bryant also missed the Athens 2004 Olympics, due to his sexual assault case, and finally debuted at the Beijing 2008 Olympics.

MORE: Kobe used gold medal to motivate Gasol in locker room

Olympic cycling champion faces army reprimand for bare-bottom White House photo

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BERN, Switzerland (AP) — Olympic cycling champion Nino Schurter faces being reprimanded by the Swiss Army after posting a photo on social media showing his bare bottom with the White House in the background.

The army confirmed details reported in Swiss media that the 33-year-old mountain biker faces a possible warning from his senior officers over the incident this month, though any disciplinary action will not be announced.

The Rio gold medalist and record eight-time world champion is supported in his career by Switzerland’s military.

Schurter was on service duty between races in the United States two weeks ago when he posted a photo on Instagram with three team colleagues all dropping their pants while facing the White House.

The photo, since deleted but viewable here, was tagged to President Donald Trump and included the message “white (peach emoji) for the White House.”

The Swiss Army says it did not want to make a scandal of the incident, and Schurter had apologized to his commanding officer. He told Swiss media taking the photo had been spontaneous and he loved being in the U.S.

Schurter is the current Swiss sportsman of the year, beating tennis great Roger Federer into second place in December in a public vote.

MORE: World Road Cycling Championships TV Schedule

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2019 World Road Cycling Championships TV, live stream schedule

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The World Road Cycling Championships begin Sunday in Yorkshire, Great Britain. Every race streams live for NBC Sports Gold “Cycling Pass” subscribers.

Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and NBCSN also air TV coverage of the eight-day championships.

Look for a possibly wide-open men’s time trial on Wednesday given 2017 champion Tom Dumoulin of the Netherlands is out after missing the Tour de France with a knee injury. Australian Rohan Dennis, last year’s winner, is a bit of an unknown after quitting the Tour de France in a dispute with his team.

Slovakian Peter Sagan looks to reclaim the road race on the final day on Sept. 29. Sagan won three straight titles before 39-year-old Alejandro Valverde of Spain took last year’s event on a climber’s course.

Dutch women swept the time trial and road race titles the last two years. They’re once again led by Anna van der Breggen, the reigning Olympic and world road race champion, and Annemiek van Vleuten, who recovered from her head-first Rio Olympic crash to win the last two world time trials.

But look out for another Dutch veteran, Marianne Vos, a 32-year-old having a resurgent season. The London Olympic road race champ seeks her first world medal since the tail end of her single-day road dominance in 2013.

The U.S. roster is led by Amber Neben, who won her second time trial world title in 2017 at age 42, and Chloe Dygert Owen, the 22-year-old track world champion who wants to make the Olympic team in both disciplines.

The American men feature Chad Haga, who won the final-stage time trial at the Giro d’Italia in June, and fellow Tour de France veterans Brent Bookwalter and Lawson Craddock.

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MORE: Chris Froome: Pre-Tour de France crash like ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ scene

Date Event Time (ET) Network
Sept. 22 Team Time Trial Mixed Relay 8:10 a.m. Streaming
5:30 p.m.* Olympic Channel
Sept. 23 Women’s Junior Individual Time Trial 5 a.m. Olympic Channel
Men’s Junior Individual Time Trial 8:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 24 Men’s U23 Individual Time Trial 5 a.m. Olympic Channel
Women’s Individual Time Trial 9:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 25 Men’s Individual Time Trial 8 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 26 Men’s Junior Road Race 7 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 27 Women’s Junior Road Race 3:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
Men’s U23 Road Race 9 a.m. Olympic Channel
Sept. 28 Women’s Road Race 5:40 a.m. Streaming
2:30 p.m.* Olympic Channel
Sept. 29 Men’s Road Race 3:30 a.m. Olympic Channel
10 p.m.* NBCSN

*Same-day delayed broadcast.