Bob Bowman, Michael Phelps
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Michael Phelps’ concussion, more highlights from Bob Bowman’s book

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Michael Phelps was “clocked by an oar and suffered a concussion” during a rowing exercise while training in a program run by the Navy SEALs in 2010, according to Bob Bowman‘s book, “The Golden Rules,” released Tuesday.

That’s just one of the interesting stories from Bowman’s coaching career dotting the pages of his 10 steps to world-class excellence in life and work.

VIDEO: Bowman discusses ‘The Golden Rules’ on TODAY
EXCERPT: Bowman, Phelps meet in 2013 to discuss comeback

Other gems include:

  • Bowman had Phelps on a workout regimen that put him on pace for nine gold medals at the Beijing Olympics: “Eventually, we realized that the actual Olympic swimming schedule made it virtually impossible for MP to go for nine, but our revamped Game Plan had still done the job. Michael not only matched Spitz’s record but bettered it by one.”
  • Phelps’ “letdown” after the Beijing 2008 Olympics: “‘Nothing’s good enough for you!’ [Phelps] barked at me more than once. ‘I had to win eight gold medals to get a “Good job” out of you. Lay off, would you?'”
  • At the 2010 Pan Pacific Championships, Bowman doubted his coaching ability when a backstroker he trained, Liz Pelton, struggled at the meet.
    “‘What is wrong with you, Bowman? How did you mess this girl up? You brought her to this meet and she’s clearly not ready. Maybe it’s true. Maybe you can only coach Michael. You’ll never be able to coach anyone else.’
    Ten minutes into my self-imposed isolation, Michael came out and found me. This time he kicked me in the butt.
    ‘Pull yourself together and get back to the meet,’ he told me.”
  • On Phelps’ tumultuous’ training leading up to the London Olympics: “On July 5, one month before the Games began, Michael showed up for a 7 a.m. practice; from that point on, he never missed another workout or was late for one during the run-up to the Games.”
  • Bowman and Phelps agreed one day before leaving Baltimore that he would swim the 400m individual medley at the London Olympics: “The last words out of my mouth being, ‘What’s the worst thing that could happen? You win a silver medal? You’d never do worse than that.”
    Phelps finished fourth and “launched into Bowman” afterward:
    “‘I know, I know! I didn’t train! I played golf. I didn’t come to the pool enough. I can’t swim. I know. What else can I do wrong?’
    I just said, ‘You know what, Michael? There’s a whole long list of things you’ve done wrong, but we’re going to start with breaststroke.’
    That immediately toned him down. All he said was, ‘Okay.'”
  • Phelps’ words to Bowman before his final London Olympic race: “‘Bob, I wanted to be like Michael Jordan in basketball and change the sport. Bob, I wanted people to know about swimming. We’ve done that, Bob. We’ve become the best ever, but we got here together. Bob, thanks. Thank you so much.’
    He caught me off guard, and I started to well up. ‘That’s not fair,’ I said seconds later.
    ‘I know,’ he said. ‘You can’t see my tears, but yours are streaming down your face.'”
  • On Chase Kalisz, the 22-year-old two-time World medalist in his training group: “He may have been nine years younger than Michael, but as soon as he started showing up for workouts as a preteen he would try to race his idol over 25 meters — and sometimes even beat him.”
  • Phelps pulled training partner Allison Schmitt aside in 2014 after Schmitt failed to qualify for the 2014 Pan Pacific Championships and 2015 World Championships: “Schmitty, this is what you do. Pull out a video of your races in London and watch them — and then use those races to visualize what you need to do to get back to where you were.”

MORE: Michael Phelps explains ‘Boomer’ name

Snowboarding pioneer Jake Burton Carpenter passes away

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Jake Burton Carpenter, the pioneer who brought snowboarding to the masses and helped turn the sport into a billion-dollar business and Olympic showpiece, has died at 65.

He died Wednesday night in Burlington, Vermont, according to an email sent to the staff of the company he founded. Carpenter had emailed his staff this month saying, “You will not believe this, but my cancer has come back.” He had been diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2011 but after several months of therapy had been given a clean bill of health.

Carpenter quit his job in New York in 1977 to form the company now known simply as Burton. His goal was to advance the rudimentary snowboard, then called a “Snurfer,” which had been invented by Sherman Poppen a dozen years earlier.

It worked, and more than four decades later, snowboarding is a major fixture at the Winter Games and snowboards are as common as skis at resorts across the globe.

“He was our founder, the soul of snowboarding, the one who gave us the sport we all love so much,” Burton co-CEO John Lacy said in his email to the staff.

Grieving Mikaela Shiffrin returns to World Cup Alpine action with fourth reindeer at stake

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The traditional World Cup Alpine skiing season opener last month in Soelden, Austria, was an emotional one for Mikaela Shiffrin.

Shiffrin’s grandmother, Pauline Condron, was in declining health in the days leading up to the race, making Shiffrin wonder if she should head home instead of staying in Soelden. Condron was especially close to Shiffrin, helping to take care of her soon after birth.

Condron passed away Oct. 22, four days before the Soelden giant slalom, at age 98.

“Polly loved sports,” Condron’s obituary said. “She was an avid bowler in her younger years and enjoyed playing tennis and skiing. Few people know that she excelled at ping pong, had a killer serve, gave up very few games and played into her 90s.”

Condron was able to see Shiffrin in person at World Cup races in Killington, Vt. The World Cup will return next weekend to Killington, which has just passed its FIS inspection.

Shiffrin finished second in Soelden’s giant slalom to an upstart rival, 17-year-old New Zealander Alice Robinson. Shiffrin is the reigning Olympic and World Cup champion in the giant slalom, but she hasn’t won in Soelden since 2014.

In the slalom, Shiffrin is more dominant. She won eight of nine World Cup races last year, losing only to Slovakia’s Petra Vlhova, and won her fourth straight world championship despite battling illness. The last time Shiffrin finished worse than second in the technical discipline was in the 2018 Olympics, when she uncharacteristically faltered and finished fourth.

Saturday’s race in Levi, Finland, is a slalom. Shiffrin has won three of the last five races in Levi, which means she also has three reindeer  Rudolph, Sven and Mr. Gru. She can win a fourth on Saturday.

The men also have a slalom this weekend in Levi, racing Sunday.

Both runs for each event stream live on NBC Sports Gold at 4:15 and 7 a.m. ET, with the Olympic Channel also carrying the second runs each day.

MORE: Alpine skiing TV schedule

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