U.S. women’s volleyball team takes risk with peer reviews

U.S. women's volleyball
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The experiment might have backfired with any other group: A decorated former player-turned-coach asked a team of world-class athletes to share candid feedback about each other through peer reviews.

U.S. women’s volleyball coach Karch Kiraly would have considered scrapping the idea altogether had his players said no way. Instead, they embraced it, and discovered their teammates’ words made them better as individuals and as a whole. Now, the Americans are heading into this summer’s Rio Olympics in search of that elusive gold medal with a stronger sense of what makes each one of them so valuable.

Rachael Adams hadn’t known her teammates so respected her competitive fire and energy.

Megan Easy learned, to her surprise, just how much her teammates admire the way she is handling the balance of her volleyball career and caring for toddler son, Easton.

Setter Alisha Glass accepted some constructive criticism that she could be even more vocal as a leader, and went right to work on it.

“Some people would be, ‘Wow, you guys evaluate each other on some very personal things,'” captain Christa Dietzen said. “We evaluate each other on a number of different things — respect, our ability to compete every day, bring it every day, some really intense things.”

Kiraly and his assistants asked players to review the coaching staff last year, then brought up the idea with the national team in late December of also having the players conduct evaluations. A source of annual apprehension in workplaces, it’s a rare practice on sports teams.

The Americans went for it with open minds.

“I guarantee to you not a lot of teams could,” said Natalie Hagglund, the libero, or back-row specialist. “It’s difficult to hear the things you can improve on because you want to hear, ‘You’re so good, you’re so good.’ It’s really difficult but it’s one of the most important things ever, especially on a 14-person roster or a 16-person training roster where we’re so close. We can affect how each and every one of the people on our team plays just by saying a few things, so that was huge.”

They will never know who said what. It was all anonymous. Still, there was anxiety.

Some players feared it might be just as hard to give critical feedback as it would be to receive it.

“People were a little nervous,” Easy said. “We have a lot of different personalities and some people might not be comfortable saying anything about someone else or some people might be really quick to say, ‘You’re this way and you need to change this,'” Easy said. “We all have each other’s best interests in mind and sometimes it’s hard to hear things that maybe you even know you need to change about yourself. But hearing it from someone else just gives you that confirmation that it is a thing to work on.”

The evaluation forms were mailed out before the Americans reconvened from their club teams in Southern California on Dec. 26 ahead of a January Olympic qualifier in Nebraska, where the U.S. secured its Rio berth after missing an opportunity last year with a pair of World Cup defeats in Japan. It was the group’s lone tournament loss in the last seven.

Once back together training, the women discussed the reviews during team meetings. They also have worked with sports psychologist Michael Gervais.

Kiraly, who won gold as an Olympian in beach and indoor volleyball, was an assistant coach for the women under Hugh McCutcheon at the London Olympics four years ago, and he had hoped to do the peer evaluations earlier. Yet the timing wound up being ideal ahead of the qualifier.

“People call that kind of a 360 review. We created our own, rudimentary version,” Kiraly said. “The neat thing was, lots of players were really excited — and a little apprehensive, understandably — but excited to learn. Our big job is to grow, so this is an opportunity to learn why we can be a little better.”

Many times, team dynamics are tough. Egos might run rampant. Personalities vary. Feelings can get hurt.

“Especially women, too,” Adams said. “Women take things a whole lot differently than men and of course we know there’s probably a comment in everyone’s where like, ‘I feel misunderstood on that one,’ but it’s all coming from a good place and we all want to make each other better.”

Having gone through the process, players realize they are in an environment where taking chances is not only accepted but unitedly encouraged.

“It gives you a little more freedom to try something new and maybe try something that’s not in your comfort zone. When you know that your teammates want that from you, you know you’re in good company and that you can make those risks and try to do different things,” Glass said. “They’re saying, ‘No, go ahead, you have the freedom to grow and expand.'”

The Americans got out of the project just what Kiraly hoped — and he believes it could lead to a special summer ahead. The U.S. women have never won Olympic gold in volleyball after believing they should have brought home a victory from London in 2012 before settling for a second straight silver medal at the hands of Brazil.

“If they were not open to it I would have been far more loathe to go ahead with it,” Kiraly said. “It’s a special group. I’ve told lots of people, it’s an incredible group to work with. I’m very fortunate.”

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Katie Ledecky out-touches new rival at swimming’s U.S. Open, extends streak

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It was a rare sight: Katie Ledecky being matched stroke for stroke in a distance race in an American pool. She was up for the challenge.

Ledecky out-touched emerging 16-year-old Canadian Summer McIntosh by eight hundredths of a second in the 400m freestyle at the U.S. Open in Greensboro, N.C., on Thursday night.

Ledecky and McIntosh were tied at the 300-meter mark. Ledecky ended up clocking 3:59.71 to McIntosh’s 3:59.79 to extend a decade-long win streak in freestyle races of 400 meters or longer in U.S. pools.

“I know we’ll have a lot more races ahead of us,” Ledecky said on Peacock. “We bring the best out of each other.”

The U.S. Open continues Friday with live finals coverage on Peacock at 6 p.m. ET.

U.S. OPEN SWIMMING: Full Results

At the Tokyo Olympics, McIntosh placed fourth in the 400m free at age 14.

She accelerated this year, taking silver behind Ledecky at the world championships and silver behind Tokyo gold medalist Ariarne Titmus of Australia at the Commonwealth Games.

Then in October, McIntosh outdueled Ledecky in a 400m free — also by eight hundredths — in a short-course, 25-meter pool at a FINA World Cup meet in Toronto. Long-course meets like the Olympics and the U.S. Open are held in 50-meter pools.

McIntosh also won world titles in the 200m butterfly and 400m individual medley, becoming the youngest individual world champion since 2011.

A potential showdown among Ledecky, Titmus and McIntosh at the 2024 Paris Games is already being compared to the “Race of the Century,” the 2004 Olympic men’s 200m free where Australian Ian Thorpe edged Dutchman Pieter van den Hoogenband and Michael Phelps.

In other events Thursday, Regan Smith, an Olympic and world medalist in the backstroke and butterfly, won a 200m individual medley in a personal best 2:10.40, a time that would have placed fifth at June’s world championships. She beat 16-year-old Leah Hayes, who took bronze in the event at worlds.

Olympic 400m IM champ Chase Kalisz won the men’s 200m IM in 1:56.52, his best time ever outside of major summer meets. Frenchman Léon Marchand won the world title in 1:55.22 in June, when Kalisz was fourth.

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Eliud Kipchoge, two races shy of his target, to make Boston Marathon debut

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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World record holder Eliud Kipchoge will race the Boston Marathon for the first time on April 17.

Kipchoge, who at September’s Berlin Marathon lowered his world record by 30 seconds to 2:01:09, has won four of the six annual major marathons — Berlin, Tokyo, London and Chicago.

The 38-year-old Kenyan has never raced Boston, the world’s oldest annual marathon dating to 1897, nor New York City but has repeated in recent years a desire to enter both of them.

Typically, he has run the London Marathon in the spring and the Berlin Marathon in the fall.

Kipchoge’s last race in the U.S. was the 2014 Chicago Marathon, his second of 10 consecutive marathon victories from 2014 through 2019.

He can become the first reigning men’s marathon world record holder to finish the Boston Marathon since South Korean Suh Yun-Bok set a world record of 2:25:39 in Boston in 1947, according to the Boston Athletic Association.

In 2024 in Paris, Kipchoge is expected to race the Olympic marathon and bid to become the first person to win three gold medals in that event.

The Boston Marathon field also includes arguably the second- and third-best men in the world right now — Kipchoge’s Kenyan training partners Evans Chebet and Benson Kipruto. Chebet won Boston and New York City this year. Kipruto won Boston last year and Chicago this year.

American Des Linden, who won Boston in 2018, headlines the women’s field.

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