Aly Raisman takes advice from Tom Brady, eyes another Olympics

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The double standard didn’t hit Aly Raisman fully until she found herself talking to New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady. You know, as one does.

The three-time Olympic medalist, all of 22, was trying to explain to Brady the long odds she faced of making it to Rio de Janeiro this summer for the 2016 Games. Brady, a four-time Super Bowl winner still going strong in his late 30s, just didn’t get it.

“I was like, `I’m too old,”‘ Raisman said. “Tom said, `No. you’re not.’ And it’s like, when quarterbacks win the Super Bowl, they don’t ask them if they’re done.”‘

Maybe because American gymnasts on the other side of their 20th birthday usually are.

Since Martha Karolyi took over as national team coordinator in 2001, the window for the top American women to compete at the highest level has been limited to a gymnastics version of “one and done.” No U.S. female gymnast who made her Olympic debut under Karolyi’s guidance has come back to do it again four years later. That’s due to a variety of factors, from health concerns to a seemingly endless stream of fresh faces.

Karolyi’s job is to win gold medals, preferably lots of them. And while the U.S. is so deep that any five-woman combination of the top Americans would be favored to stand on top of the podium during the Olympic team final, Karolyi won’t be satisfied getting there by a point or two. She wants to leave no doubt.

Yet Raisman and defending Olympic all-around champion Gabby Douglas – closing in on her 21st birthday – are still here. Press them on why and usually the response is some variation of “why not?”

“I’ve got the rest of my life to just chill back and lay back,” Douglas said.

The goal is to delay the start of the next chapter for as long as possible, even though there is scant evidence of American women staying at the top beyond one Olympic cycle. For proof of how hard it is, look no further than Douglas and Raisman’s other “Fierce Five” buddies from London – all teenagers when they overwhelmed the field to join 1996’s “Magnificent Seven” as the only Americans to win team gold.

In the afterglow, all five talked about giving it another shot. Instead, London turned out to be the last stand for 2011 world all-around champion Jordyn Wieber, who retired due to injury and is now at UCLA, where she serves as the most overqualified student manager in the country for the school’s women’s gymnastics team. McKayla Maroney (Google “McKayla Maroney is not impressed” for a reminder) hasn’t competed since winning gold on vault at the 2013 world championships. Kyla Ross, just 15 in London, won a handful of medals at worlds in 2013 and 2014 but stepped down from the elite program earlier this year after a subtle but steady decline in form and is now prepping to join the Bruins in the fall.

Raisman and Douglas sacrificed the chance to compete in college when they turned professional before London. Their Olympic success opened up the kind of lucrative financial opportunities they’d have had to pass up if they held onto their amateur status as Ross did.

They game-planned expertly, taking a break after the Games to cash in on their celebrity while continuing to keep an eye on Rio off in the distance, opting to hit “pause” instead of “stop.” Douglas oversaw a film based on her life and is currently being followed around by reality TV cameras chronicling her bid to become the first woman to repeat as Olympic all-around gold medalist in nearly 50 years.

Raisman stopped by “Dancing With The Stars.” There were apparel deals and distractions, all while current three-time reigning world champion Simone Biles led the next wave of girls ready to fill the void. Douglas bounced from training in Iowa to Los Angeles back to Iowa before resettling in Columbus. Raisman’s longtime coach, Mihai Brestyan, put her through months of conditioning before clearing her to do a single tumbling pass.

They returned to competition at the same meet in Italy in March 2015, helped the Americans win gold at the 2015 world championships and head to this week’s U.S. championships in St. Louis – the last warm-up before the Olympic Trials in San Jose next month – very much in the mix.

Douglas captured the American Cup in New Jersey and the Jesolo Cup in Italy this spring. Raisman won gold at the U.S. Classic in Connecticut earlier this month, albeit with Douglas and Biles competing in just two events instead of the usual four.

Douglas and Raisman, who has a floor exercise gold medal and a bronze on balance beam to go with the team gold the Americans won in London, know not to get ahead of themselves. They remember the end of Nastia Liukin and Alicia Sacramone‘s storied careers. A member of the silver-medal winning 2008 Olympic team, Sacramone, 24, was pointed toward London when she tore her Achilles in the days before the 2011 world championships. She returned to competition in less than eight months hoping to make the cut as an event specialist. She couldn’t.

“I just had this feeling,” Sacramone said. “I just don’t think I’m going to make it. People weren’t talking to me. … It was just a mix of being like, `Yep, I’m being pushed out the door.”‘

Liukin, the defending Olympic champion, held out hope until her throbbing shoulders finally gave out on the uneven bars, her signature event. She rose and saw a standing ovation through tears. She was 22.

Both were well past their peaks by American standards but practically neophytes compared to some of their international competitors. Oksana Chusovitina of Uzbekistan turned 41 on June 19, seven weeks before her seventh Olympics.

“We are woman, we say one thing and change our mind,” Chusovitina joked at the world championships in Scotland last fall.

Daniele Hypolito of host Brazil will be 32 in September. Romania’s Catalina Ponor came out of retirement in her late 20s and may be the only Romainian female gymnast in Rio – a month before her 29th birthday – after the longtime powerhouse stunningly failed to qualify as a team. Ponor returned in part out of duty, yet her presence highlights the hardening gap between the U.S. and most of the rest of the world.

One of the reasons gymnasts like Chusovitina and Ponor keep making their way back is because their country lacks the competitive depth to make them replaceable. That’s not the case in the U.S. – which is what makes Raisman and Douglas’ bids so spectacular.

“People think if you make a comeback you’re going to fail,” Douglas said. “And that’s not the case.”

MORE: Ten gymnasts to watch at P&G Women’s Championships

Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed in the final miles, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in an unprecedented 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

“I was planning to go through it [the halfway mark] 60:50, 60:40,” Kipchoge said. “My legs were running actually very fast. I thought, let me just try to run two hours flat, but all in all, I am happy with the performance.

“We went too fast [in the first half]. It takes energy from the muscles. … There’s still more in my legs [to possibly lower the record again].”

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history for somebody who ran one prior marathon in 2:34:01. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48. D’Amato, who went nearly a decade between competitive races after college, owns the American record of 2:19:12 and now also the 10th-best time in U.S. history.

“Today wasn’t my best day ever, but it was the best I could do today,” she said in a text message, according to Race Results Weekly, adding that she briefly stopped and walked late in the race.

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago. The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, clocking 1:59:40 in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
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The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France 74, Mali 59 Group B
4 a.m. Australia 69, Serbia 54 Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada 70, Japan 56 Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final