Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte
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U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials broadcast schedule

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Michael PhelpsKatie LedeckyRyan Lochte and Missy Franklin are among the stars who will dot 26 finals across eights nights at the U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials in Omaha, starting Sunday on NBC, NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra.

The top two in each final will qualify for Rio, plus up to the top six finishers in the 100m and 200m freestyles for relay purposes, so long as the total Olympic team size does not exceed 26 men and 26 women.

There is a chance that the Big Four of Phelps, Ledecky, Lochte and Franklin could swim in finals on all but the last night.

Phelps’ coach, Bob Bowman, said on May 31 that Phelps will enter the 100m and 200m butterfly and the 200m individual medley, plus at least one more event.

Phelps could also swim the 100m and 200m freestyles, perhaps with the goal of posting a strong time in preliminary heats or semifinals to further prove he deserves a spot in the Olympic 4x100m and 4x200m free relay pools.

TRIALS: Broadcast ScheduleEntry Lists
PREVIEWS: Men | Women
FIVE KEY RACES: Men | Women

Ledecky could swim the 100m through 800m freestyles and the 400m individual medley, though the latter could be merely to get her feet wet on the first day of the meet.

A question for Lochte is whether he will enter the grueling 400m individual medley on the first day. He is the reigning Olympic champion but rarely raced it in 2013 and 2014 before looking sharper in the last year and a half.

Franklin is probably the easiest to predict of the Big Four. She has kept the same primary events the last four years — 100m and 200m freestyles and 100m and 200m backstrokes.

Daily live coverage will include qualifying heats online and finals on NBC, with NBC Sports Live Extra streaming all coverage.

MORE: Full NBC Olympic Trials broadcast schedule

Day Time (ET) Network Key Events
Sun, June 26 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
6 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC M/W 400 IM; M 400 FR | STREAM
Mon, June 27 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
6:30 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC W 100 FL, 400 FR; M 100 BR | STREAM
Tues, June 28 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
7 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC M/W 100 BK; W 100 BR; M 200 FR | STREAM
Wed, June 29 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
7 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC W 200 FR, 200 IM; M 200 FL | STREAM
Thurs, June 30 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
6:30 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC M 100 FR, 200 BR; W 200 FL | STREAM
9 p.m. NBCSN M 200 IM (semis) | STREAM
Fri, July 1 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
6 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC W 100 FR, 200 BR; M 200 BK, 200 IM | STREAM
Sat, July 2 11 a.m. Digital Qualifying Heats | STREAM
5 p.m. NBCSN Qualifying Heats (tape) | STREAM
8 p.m. NBC W 200 BK, 800 FR; M 50 FR, 100 FL | STREAM
Sun, July 3 8 p.m. NBC W 50 FR, M 1500 FR | STREAM

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals