Maggie Nichols, Madison Kocian fight off injuries hoping to crack deep U.S. roster

Getty Images
0 Comments

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Maggie Nichols gets the question pretty frequently, usually from one of her high school classmates and usually with a very specific caveat.

“They say, ‘Who do you think is going to be on the Olympic team?'” the 18-year-old gymnast said with a laugh. “Then it’s like, ‘Well, who besides you?'”

Out of sheer politeness, Nichols does not correct them, though she’s well aware that her place on the five-woman team that will head to Rio de Janeiro in August as heavy favorites to load up on copious amounts of medals is hardly a given. Besides, who doesn’t want to be told by someone – anyone really – that they’re good enough to be an Olympian? If Nichols is being honest, she’s not above doing the math in her head, too.

“Sometimes it’s good to think about that stuff just to prepare yourself,” Nichols said.

One way or the other.

Nichols appeared to be a near lock after helping the U.S. cruise to a world championship last October. She was the only American to compete in all four events during the team final – a big vote of confidence from national team coordinator Martha Karolyi – and added a bronze medal on floor exercise.

Then she felt a twinge in her knee while landing a vault during practice in early April. An MRI revealed a torn meniscus, one easily repaired with minor surgery. But it forced her to skip the Pacific Rims and the Secret Classic, two important preliminary meets ahead of this weekend’s U.S. championships and the U.S. Olympic Trials next month in San Jose.

Nichols could only cheer as her friends – the same friends she’s trying to beat out for an Olympic berth – did their best to catch Karolyi’s attention.

“It’s weird watching them compete,” Nichols said. “But it was nice because I knew where I needed to get that extra gear up.”

Nichols had a shoulder to lean on during the process. Madison Kocian, who like Nichols won a pair of medals at worlds last fall, began March on crutches after two bones in her left ankle smacked together during a national team camp. The ensuing bone bruise left the 19-year-old frustrated and bummed out.

“It hit me both mentally and physically,” Kocian said. “But on the mental side it was like, ‘Gosh I was pretty much at my top heading into this year. It’s such an important year.”

The most important, at least for Kocian and Nichols, both of whom are planning on stepping away from elite gymnastics to focus on college careers when the current Olympic cycle is over. They took turns trying to cheer each other up during their rehabs, working on what they could (mostly upper body strength and conditioning) while trying to show Karolyi during the team camps this spring they had no intention of letting the setbacks slow them down.

“I just wanted to show up and be in front of her,” Kocian said. “It’s super important.”

Good idea considering the wealth of options at Karolyi’s fingertips. Karolyi is stepping down from her post after Rio and has no plans on doing it with anything less than one last gold. She called the current group of top Americans as deep as she’s seen, starting with three-time reigning world champion Simone Biles and defending Olympic all-around gold medalist Gabby Douglas. Barring injury, the two stars figure to be on the plane to Brazil. Three-time Olympic medalist Aly Raisman also is in good position, though Raisman joked the U.S. is so talented Karolyi could pick five names out of a hat and be fine.

And while Karolyi is quick to praise Nichols and Kocian for their spectacular contributions at worlds, those heady two weeks in Scotland are now so 2015.

“As we go closer to the major competition for what we (are) selecting, it’s more important what you do (now) than what you did a half a year ago,” Karolyi said. “That makes a difference.”

Kocian returned at the Secret Classic in Hartford earlier this month, posting the second-highest score on bars. She will take on a heavier workload this weekend but her best bet at going to Rio probably depends on her ability to become one of Karolyi’s top three choices on Kocian’s signature event.

The two teenagers are trying not to put too much pressure on themselves. You don’t spend this much time in the national program without having a little toughness, something they had a chance to show during a commercial for Under Armour, when the cameras played a montage of the draining daily grind of competing for a dynasty.

They were overwhelmed by the response, though the understated Kocian gave credit to the cameras and the lighting for showcasing arms that look like they were transplanted off an MMA fighter.

“I guess it looked pretty cool,” Kocian said.

Not as cool, though, as standing atop a podium in Rio.

MORE: Maggie Nichols ’97 percent’ going into P&G Championships

12-year-old skateboarders earn medals at world championships

Chloe Covell
Getty
0 Comments

At the world skateboarding championships, 12-year-olds Chloe Covell from Australia and Onodera Ginwoo from Japan earned silver and bronze medals, respectively, in Sunday’s street finals.

In the women’s event, Covell took silver behind Brazilian 15-year-old Rayssa Leal, who was a silver medalist herself at the Tokyo Games.

Frenchman Aurélien Giraud, a 25-year-old who was sixth in skateboarding’s Olympic debut in Tokyo, won the men’s final in the United Arab Emirates. Ginwoo was third behind Portugal’s Gustavo Ribeiro.

The top Americans were Olympic men’s bronze medalist Jagger Eaton in sixth and 15-year-old Paige Heyn in seventh in the women’s event.

Nyjah Huston, a six-time world champion who placed seventh in Tokyo, missed worlds after August surgery for an ACL tear.

Up to three men and three women per nation can qualify per event (street and park) for the 2024 Paris Games. World rankings come June 2024 determine which Americans qualify.

In Tokyo, four of the 12 skateboarding medalists were ages 12 or 13.

Japan’s Kokona Hiraki, then 12, won silver in women’s park to become the youngest Olympic medalist since 1936, according to Olympedia.org. Japan’s Momiji Nishiya, then 13, won women’s street and became the youngest gold medalist in an individual event since 1936.

Worlds conclude this week with the men’s and women’s park events. The finals are Saturday.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Francesco Friedrich, most decorated bobsledder in history, rebounds for 12th world title

Francesco Friedrich
Getty
0 Comments

A week after his first major championships defeat in seven years, German Francesco Friedrich returned to his winning ways to close the world bobsled championships on Sunday.

Friedrich’s four-man sled won the world title by 69 hundredths of a second over British and Latvian sleds that tied for silver, combining times from four runs over the last two days in St. Moritz, Switzerland. It marked Great Britain’s first world championships men’s bobsled medal since 1966.

Geoff Gadbois drove the lone U.S. sled in the field, finishing 18th.

Friedrich, the most decorated bobsledder in history, extended his records with a fifth consecutive world four-man title and 12th world championship between two- and four-man events.

Germany swept all four titles at bobsled worlds with four different drivers taking gold.

Friedrich had won 12 consecutive Olympic or world titles before taking two-man silver at worlds last week in St. Moritz, Switzerland. He was dethroned in that event by countryman Johannes Lochner.

Friedrich has been hampered recently by a muscle injury from sprint training in late December. Going into worlds, Lochner had won four consecutive World Cup two-man races, while Hall won the last two World Cups in four-man.

Friedrich, 32, said before this season that he plans to make the 2026 Milan-Cortina Winter Games his final competition. Friedrich and push athlete Thorsten Margis can break the record of four career Olympic bobsled gold medals that they currently share with retired Germans Andre Lange and Kevin Kuske.

The World Cup season concludes with stops in Igls, Austria, and Sigulda, Latvia, the next two weekends.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!