Justin Gatlin speeds up in Eugene, but another gear needed against Usain Bolt

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EUGENE, Ore. — Justin Gatlin says there’s more left in the tank for Rio. He will need it if Usain Bolt, after recovering from his hamstring injury, is the Bolt of 2015.

As expected, Gatlin won the 100m at the U.S. Olympic Trials on Sunday afternoon. He is now the world’s fastest man for 2016, but he is also slower than his torrid pace from 2015.

“I think there’s more there,” Gatlin said.

In the final, Gatlin clocked 9.80 seconds with a significant tailwind — 1.6 meters per second.

He became the oldest man to make a U.S. Olympic team in a sprint event (100m, 200m or 400m) since 1912.

Gatlin will be joined in Rio by Trayvon Bromell, the 2015 World Championships co-bronze medalist racing at his first meet since suffering a grade-one Achilles tear one month ago.

Bromell clocked 9.84 seconds for second place Sunday, matching his personal best to become, at age 20, the youngest U.S. Olympic men’s 100m runner since 1984.

Marvin Bracy, who passed up playing football for Florida State to pursue a professional track career in 2013, took third in 9.98 seconds.

Several other stars made the Olympic team Sunday. Allyson Felix fought through an ankle injury to win the 400m, halfway to her planned Olympic 200m-400m double. Ashton Eaton prevailed in the decathlon, also while not 100 percentVashti Cunningham became the youngest U.S. track and field Olympian in 36 yearsEnglish GardnerTianna Bartoletta and Tori Bowie provided the fastest women’s 100m podium of all time, all sub-10.80 seconds.

Track and Field Trials
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But the sport’s marquee event is the men’s 100m. And Bolt-Gatlin is the premier (and one-sided) rivalry.

If Gatlin proved anything Sunday, it’s that he is still the world’s top challenger to Bolt. There were doubts coming into this meet, as his best time this year was 9.93 seconds (fifth in the world).

The last two days, Gatlin ran 10.03 in the first round, 9.83 in the semifinals and then the 9.80 final. He now owns the two fastest times in the world this year, though slower than his 9.74 and 9.75 from spring 2015.

“Last year was all about time and running fast and being consistent,” said Gatlin, who suffered a significant ankle injury in the offseason. “This year is about rising to the occasion, rising to the moment.”

And it is unknown how Gatlin will handle the moment in Rio next month. In 2015, Gatlin went to the world championships favored to beat Bolt on the strength of those spring times and injuries to the Jamaican legend the previous year. Many rooted against him, because Gatlin was five years removed from a four-year doping ban and because of the universal admiration for Bolt.

Gatlin led the 100m final until the last few strides. Bolt closed the gap two lanes to his left, and Gatlin made what Michael Johnson called “a Bolt-forced error,” stumbling slightly, flailing his arms and unfurling his usually crisp form.

Bolt won in 9.79. Gatlin was second in 9.80, into a slight headwind.

On Sunday, Gatlin again ran 9.80, but with that tailwind and no late breakdown. NBC Olympics analyst Ato Boldon said that won’t cut it in Rio.

“You can think, oh, Bolt’s not 100 percent this year, and maybe it won’t take 9.6 to win this time, I think you do that at your peril,” Boldon told the House of Run podcast Sunday evening. “Unless you’re going to Rio with designs on running better than 9.70 or thereabouts, the medal you go home with is not going to be gold.”

Gatlin had little intention of getting caught up in Bolt talk Sunday evening. On the Hayward Field track, Lewis Johnson asked Gatlin about having to go through the Jamaican in Rio.

“First of all, I’ve got to face these young bucks right here,” Gatlin responded, standing next to Bromell and Bracy.

Later in the mixed zone, Gatlin was asked if he had any words for Usain. There were none, only a thumbs-up.

Gatlin said his last race before the Olympics will be the 200m here later this week. The next time he races the 100m, it will be in Rio, where Bolt may again be standing a lane or two away.

How does Gatlin plan to change the outcome from last summer?

“Don’t get greedy,” he said Saturday. “If I get greedy … you’re reaching for something that’s not there. You’re reaching for more. Once you’re up there trying to get it, you’re going to fall down.”

MORE: Cunningham becomes youngest U.S. track and field Olympian in 36 years

Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke his own world record in winning the Berlin Marathon, clocking 2:01:09 to lower the previous record time of 2:01:39 he set in the German capital in 2018.

Kipchoge, 37 and a two-time Olympic champion, earned his 15th win in 17 career marathons to bolster his claim as the greatest runner in history over 26.2 miles.

His pacing was not ideal. Kipchoge slowed in the final miles, running 61:18 for the second half after going out in an unprecedented 59:51 for the first 13.1 miles. He still won by 4:49 over Kenyan Mark Korir.

“I was planning to go through it [the halfway mark] 60:50, 60:40,” Kipchoge said. “My legs were running actually very fast. I thought, let me just try to run two hours flat, but all in all, I am happy with the performance.

“We went too fast [in the first half]. It takes energy from the muscles. … There’s still more in my legs [to possibly lower the record again].”

MORE: Berlin Marathon Results

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa won the women’s race in 2:15:37, the third-fastest time in history for somebody who ran one prior marathon in 2:34:01. Only Brigid Kosgei (2:14:14 in Chicago in 2019) and Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25 in London in 2003) have gone faster.

American record holder Keira D’Amato, who entered as the top seed, was sixth in 2:21:48. D’Amato, who went nearly a decade between competitive races after college, owns the American record of 2:19:12 and now also the 10th-best time in U.S. history.

“Today wasn’t my best day ever, but it was the best I could do today,” she said in a text message, according to Race Results Weekly, adding that she briefly stopped and walked late in the race.

The last eight instances the men’s marathon world record has been broken, it has come on the pancake-flat roads of Berlin. It began in 2003, when Kenyan Paul Tergat became the first man to break 2:05.

The world record was 2:02:57 — set by Kenyan Dennis Kimetto in 2014 — until Kipchoge broke it for the first time four years ago. The following year, Kipchoge became the first person to cover 26.2 miles in under two hours, clocking 1:59:40 in a non-record-eligible showcase rather than a race.

Kipchoge’s focus going forward is trying to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles in Paris in 2024. He also wants to win all six annual World Marathon Majors. He’s checked off four of them, only missing Boston (run in April) and New York City (run every November).

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
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The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France 74, Mali 59 Group B
4 a.m. Australia 69, Serbia 54 Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada 70, Japan 56 Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final