Bernard Lagat, at 41, leaves Hayward Field with image he promised his family

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Moments after Bernard Lagat qualified to become the oldest U.S. Olympic runner of all time (sorry, Meb Keflezighi), he writhed on the Hayward Field track he has laid spikes on for nearly two decades.

His hands moved from atop his bald head in astonishment to outstretched, splattered on the track in exhaustion and finally to his mouth in admiration. His eyelids winced closed, Lagat blew a kiss and woke. The first thing he saw when he opened those eyes was a TV camera.

Lagat stuck out his tongue. Then he yelled in puffs, between hard breaths.

“Love you! … Gladys! … Miika! … Gigi!”

Those are the names of Lagat’s wife and kids, a 10-year-old son and 7-year-old daughter who were among the Hayward Field record 22,847 in attendance Saturday.

Family is Lagat’s motivation for running this one last season on the track, for enduring training sessions in the Tucson heat, for summoning that trademark kick to win the 5000m final at the Olympic Trials and qualify for his fifth Olympic team on Saturday evening.

They were also Lagat’s motivation one year ago, when he came to the U.S. Championships (also in Eugene) with an illness. Lagat was 10th in the 5000m then, way out of the top three that qualified for the world championships.

“I wanted to win it for them,” the 2000 and 2004 Olympic 1500m medalist Lagat told media in 2015, pausing as his voice cracked. “I saw them there, gave me a hug. I was going to do it for them.”

Lagat had failed to make an Olympic or world championships team for the first time since 2005, when he was ineligible due to switching his representation from Kenya to the U.S.

Lagat was proud of his Kenyan heritage, but he had lived in the U.S. since his early 20s, including running for Washington State in the late 1990s. He used to drive seven hours with his teammates and coach, James Li, from Pullman, Wash., to Eugene for dual meets.

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Li, still his coach but now in Arizona, teared up Saturday evening speaking with media after watching a press conference with a bouncing, smiling Lagat and second- and third-place finishers Hassan Mead and Paul Chelimo.

“It means really, really so much,” Li said as his eyes watered and turned red like his University of Arizona shirt. “We worked together 20 years, and the last couple years have been really pretty tough.”

Lagat’s first reflections on Saturday’s feat were of the last year in particular, about the “crushing” feeling of his 2015 failure, about deeming this his final year of racing on the track (he plans to continue road racing).

He came to this month’s Olympic Trials — his sixth, including his first Kenyan Trials in 1996 — a decided underdog. Lagat had not finished a race since May 1. On May 28, he sentimentally ran at the Prefontaine Classic at Hayward Field for the 15th and final time. But he did not finish, dropping out of the 5000m with a cold.

“I didn’t want that to be the last image,” Lagat said.

Though Lagat is the American record holder in the 1500m and 5000m, those times came way back in 2005 and 2011. In Track and Field Newspre-Trials form charts, the respected publication had Lagat second in the 10,000m and eighth in the 5000m.

From what Lagat read, others weren’t giving him that much of a chance.

“This is the biggest achievement, because, at 41, a lot of people might have already ruled me out,” Lagat said. “I was reading my newspapers, and they were just mentioning me … and also Lagat is in the race.”

In his peak Olympic years in 2000 and 2004, Lagat was best known for his prowess in the 1500m as the top rival to Moroccan legend Hicham El Guerrouj. In 2004, in El Guerrouj’s long-awaited Olympic triumph, Lagat took silver.

Lagat calls El Guerrouj, who retired in 2004 but is actually three months older than Lagat, his greatest rival.

“Bernard has marked the Games,” El Guerrouj said in an email through his agent earlier this week. “He is a strong competitor, a man who stood up even after defeats, he inspires the future champions.”

Lagat lined up in the 10,000m on the opening night of Trials, and like on May 28, dropped out before the finish of the race. He quit with seven and a half laps to go, once he knew he wasn’t going to finish in the top three, to conserve energy for the 5000m.

“I’m done crying,” Lagat said that night, hours after 27-year-old sister Violah qualified for her first Kenyan Olympic team in the 1500m. “I’m going to come back, run the 5000 meters, qualify, that’s what I promised my son.”

Lagat was the 16th and final competitor introduced for the 5000m final on Saturday evening. He felt the thunderous applause from the record crowd.

He made that familiar kick to win at Hayward Field, his eyes popping out like so many times before. Then he remembered what his daughter told him.

“Daddy, I want you to go back to the Olympics so I can watch gymnastics,” Lagat recalled (they spent Friday watching the U.S. Olympic Women’s Gymnastics Trials). “I made my daughter’s day today, so I am happy for that.”

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Joey Mantia extends U.S. medal streak at speed skating worlds; Dutch dominance returns

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Joey Mantia ensured the host U.S. finished with a medal at the world single distances championships. Ireen WüstKjeld Nuis and Jorrit Bergsma ensured the Netherlands finished atop the medal standings.

Mantia joined Shani Davis as the only U.S. men to earn individual medals at three different editions of the championships, taking bronze in the 1500m on the last day of the speed skating meet at the 2002 Olympic oval outside Salt Lake City.

Mantia won the mass start at the last two worlds in 2017 and 2019 (and finished fifth on Sunday, after the 1500m bronze).

Mantia clocked a personal best 1:42.16 in the fifth of 12 pairs of the 1500m. It held up until Nuis (1:41.66) and countryman Thomas Krol (1:41.73) in the last two pairs.

“Was starting to think that I’m so old that I can’t time trial anymore,” Mantia, a 34-year-old whose last 1500m personal best came in 2015, told media in Utah. “Maybe there’s a little bit of hope left.”

Mantia’s medal extended the U.S. streak of making the podium at every world championships this millennium — 16 straight. The single bronze is the smallest medal output since 2000.

Full results are here.

Wüst and Nuis gave the Dutch a sweep of the men’s and women’s 1500m titles, two years after they did the same at the PyeongChang Olympics. Bergsma, an Olympic and world 10,000m champion, earned his first global medal of any color — gold — in the 16-lap mass start.

The Netherlands failed to earn any golds on the first two days of the four-day competition. The dominant Dutch, who topped the medal standings at every Olympics and worlds dating to the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games, entered Sunday trailing Russia.

But Wüst began the day by clocking 1:50.92 to win the 1500m by .21 over Russian Yevgenia Lalenkova. American medal hope Brittany Bowe, the 2015 World champion who took bronze last year, finished 14th a day after taking eighth in her world-record 1000m distance.

Nuis and Krol went one-two in the men’s 1500m to tie Russia’s medal total. Then Irene Schouten took bronze in the women’s mass start to put the Netherlands ahead for good, followed by Bergsma’s capper.

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Netherlands on the board; more world records at speed skating worlds

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It took four world records from other countries before the Netherlands won its first title in an Olympic program event at the world single distances speed skating championships.

Jutta Leerdam got the dominant skating nation on the board on the third day of the four-day competition and in the ninth Olympic program event. Leerdam scored an upset over defending champion and world-record holder Brittany Bowe, the American who ended up eighth.

Leerdam, 21, prevailed despite having zero World Cup podiums to her name. She clocked 1:11.84, just .23 slower than Bowe’s world record set on the same Utah Olympic Oval last year. Bowe, who recently had her yearlong win streak snapped in the 1000m, finished in 1:12.92.

“It’s a nightmare,” Bowe said, according to media on site.

Later, the Netherlands won the men’s team pursuit in a world record 3:34.68, the fifth world record in Olympic events the last two days on the world’s fastest ice at the 2002 Olympic oval outside Salt Lake City.

Full results are here.

The world championships conclude Sunday, highlighted by American Joey Mantia defending his world title in the mass start.

In other Saturday events, both the men’s 1000m and women’s 5000m world records fell. On Friday, world records were lowered in the men’s 10,000m and women’s team pursuit.

Pavel Kulizhnikov followed his Friday world 500m title with the 1000m crown, repeating his double gold from 2016. Kulizhnikov was one of the Russians banned from the PyeongChang Olympics after he served a prior doping ban.

On Saturday, Kulizhnikov clocked 1:05.69 to take .49 off Dutchman Kjeld Nuis‘ record from last March, also set at Salt Lake City. Nuis, the Olympic 1000m and 1500m champion, took silver, 1.03 seconds behind.

Russian Natalya Voronina and Czech Martina Sablikova both went under Sablikova’s world record in the 5000m. Voronina came out on top in 6:39.02, 2.99 seconds faster than Sablikova’s record from a year ago and 2.16 seconds faster than Sablikova on Saturday.

Voronina’s time would have been the men’s world record as recently as 1993. Sablikova won the previous 10 world titles in the event dating to 2007.

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MORE: World Single Distances Championships broadcast schedule