Getty Images

Rio Olympic men’s basketball rosters

Leave a comment

The 12 rosters with 12 men each are set for the Rio Olympic men’s basketball tournament.

The U.S. has won the past two gold medals, and is expected to do the same this time around. Spain has taken silver at the past two Olympics, and is the favorite to yet again meet the Americans in the gold-medal game. Serbia, France and Lithuania also figure to contend for medals.

Australia, China, France, Serbia, the U.S. and Venezuela are in Group A. Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, Lithuania, Nigeria and Spain are in Group B. The tournament tips off Aug. 6 and concludes Aug. 21.

View the entire schedule here. The rosters are below:

Argentina
Roberto Acuna
Nicolas Brussino
Facundo Campazzo
Gabriel Deck
Carlos Delfino
Marcos Delia
Patricio Garino
Manu Ginobili
Nicolas Laprovittola
Leo Mainoldi
Andres Nocioni
Luis Scola

Australia
David Andersen
Cameron Bairstow
Aron Baynes
Andrew Bogut
Ryan Broekhoff
Matthew Dellavedova
Chris Goulding
Joe Ingles
Kevin Lisch
Damian Martin
Pat Mills
Brock Motum

Brazil
Leandro Barbosa
Vitor Benite
Cristiano Felicio
Alex Garcia
Guilherme Giovannoni
Rafael Hettsheimer
Nene Hilario
Marcelinho Huertas
Augusto Lima
Rafael Luz
Raulzinho Neto
Marquinhos Vieira

China
Ding Yanyuhang
Guo Ailun
Li Gen
Li Muhao
Sui Ran
Wang Zhelin
Yi Jianlian
Zhai Xiaochuan
Zhao Jiwei
Zhou Peng
Zhou Qi
Zou Yuchen

Croatia
Marko Arapovic
Luka Babic
Miro Bilan
Bojan Bogdanovic
Mario Hezonja
Filip Kruslin
Darko Planinic
Zeljko Sakic
Dario Saric
Krunoslav Simon
Rok Stipcevic
Roko Ukic

France
Nicolas Batum
Nando De Colo
Boris Diaw
Antoine Diot
Mickael Gelabale
Rudy Gobert
Thomas Heurtel
Charles Kahudi
Joffrey Lauvergne
Tony Parker
Florent Pietrus
Kim Tillie

Lithuania
Marius Grigonis
Paulius Jankunas
Robertas Javtokas
Adas Juskevicius
Mantas Kalnietis
Antanas Kavaliauskas
Mindaugas Kuzminskas
Jonas Maciulis
Domantas Sabonis
Renaldas Seibutis
Edgaras Ulanovas
Jonas Valanciunas

Nigeria
Josh Akognon
Alade Aminu
Ike Diogu
Ebi Ere
Michael Gbinije
Ekene Ibekwe
Shane Lawal
Andy Ogide
Chamberlain Oguchi
Stan Okoye
Michael Umeh
Ben Uzoh

Serbia
Stefan Bircevic
Bogdan Bogdanovic
Nikola Jokic
Stefan Jovic
Nikola Kalinic
Milan Macvan
Stefan Markovic
Nemanja Nedovic
Miroslav Raduljica
Marko Simonovic
Vladimir Stimac
Milos Teodosic

Spain
Alex Abrines
Jose Calderon
Victor Claver
Rudy Fernandez
Pau Gasol
Willy Hernangomez
Sergio Llull
Nikola Mirotic
Juan Carlos Navarro
Felipe Reyes
Sergio Rodriguez
Ricky Rubio

United States
Carmelo Anthony
Harrison Barnes
Jimmy Butler
DeMarcus Cousins
DeMar DeRozan
Kevin Durant
Paul George
Draymond Green
Kyrie Irving
DeAndre Jordan
Kyle Lowry
Klay Thompson

Venezuela
Nestor Colmenares
John Cox
David Cubillan
Gregory Echenique
Windi Graterol
Heissler Guillent
Dwight Lewis
Miguel Marriaga
Anthony Perez
Miguel Ruiz
Gregory Vargas
Jose Vargas

U.S. Olympic women’s tennis qualifying already looks intense

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Serena Williams is in strong early position to make the 2020 U.S. Olympic team. For everyone else, including older sister Venus Williams, every set of ranking points could be crucial over the next 10 months, including at the upcoming U.S. Open.

The U.S. has seven women in the world top 36 — not including 52nd-ranked Venus — but only four singles players can go to an Olympics from any one country come the rankings cutoff next June.

Serena Williams leads the way for Americans in second place overall in Olympic qualifying — which counts WTA rankings points starting after the 2019 French Open and running through the 2020 French Open. She has 1,885 points despite playing just two events the last two months, taking runner-up at Wimbledon and the Canadian Open.

Only Wimbledon champion Simona Halep, who has already been named Romania’s Opening Ceremony flag bearer, has more Olympic qualifying points (2,395).

After Serena, three more U.S. women are in the top 10 in Olympic qualifying — Sonya Kenin (No. 5), Madison Keys (No. 8) and Alison Riske (No. 10).

Keys, a quarterfinalist or better at all four Grand Slams in her career, jumped from outside the top 20 among Americans to the No. 3 American by notching her biggest title in Ohio last week.

Notables who must improve their ranking start with Venus Williams, who moved from 18th on the U.S. list to eighth by reaching the Cincinnati quarterfinals. She turns 40 before the Tokyo Games and could become the oldest Olympic singles player since the sport returned to the Olympic program following a 64-year break in 1988. She already owns the modern-era record of five Olympic tennis medals from her five previous Games and could still get to the Olympics in doubles if she doesn’t qualify in singles.

Sloane Stephens, the 2017 U.S. Open champion, is 12th in U.S. Olympic qualifying, winning a total of three matches among four tournaments in the window.

The veterans Williams sisters, Keys and Stephens, who made up the 2016 U.S. Olympic singles team, must fend off an emerging class.

Kenin, 20, backed up her French Open upset of Serena Williams by winning a lower-level event in June and then beating the world Nos. 1 and 2 the last two weeks.

Riske is playing some of the best tennis of her career at age 29. She beat world then-No. 1 Ash Barty to make her first Slam quarterfinal at Wimbledon, a week before her wedding.

Then there are two of the phenoms of the year. Coco Gauff, 15, is ninth in U.S. Olympic qualifying after a run to the Wimbledon fourth round. Gauff was granted a wild card into the U.S. Open, after which she can’t play in more than five senior tournaments (and possibly no more than three) until her 16th birthday in March due to WTA age restrictions to keep young teens from burnout.

Amanda Anisimova, 17, is 13th in U.S. Olympic qualifying. Her best results this year — French Open semifinal, Australian Open fourth round — came before the Olympic qualifying window.

It’s looking like the toughest U.S. Olympic women’s singles team to make outright since 2004. Back then, the U.S. had Nos. 4 (Lindsay Davenport), 7 (Jennifer Capriati), 8 (Venus Williams), 11 (Serena Williams) and 18 (Chanda Rubin). Davenport, Capriati and Serena didn’t play at the Athens Games, opening the door for Lisa Raymond to play singles and doubles in Athens.

In 2000, Serena Williams didn’t make the Olympic singles field despite being ranked eighth in the world. A max of three players per nation were taken to Sydney, and the U.S. had Nos. 2, 3 and 6 in Davenport, Venus Williams and Monica Seles.

An Olympic rule mandating a minimum of Fed Cup appearances could affect Tokyo 2020 eligibility. However, the fine print allows for that to be bypassed in discretionary exceptional circumstances.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Tokyo 2020 Olympic master competition schedule

U.S. Olympic Women’s Singles Qualifying Standings (Max. 4 can qualify)
1. Serena Williams — 1,885 points
2. Sonya Kenin — 1,081
3. Madison Keys — 972
4. Alison Riske — 802
5. Jennifer Brady — 356
6. Jessica Pegula — 348
7. Madison Brengle — 344
8. Venus Williams — 302
9. Coco Cauff — 298
10. Bernarda Pera — 280
11. Lauren Davis — 245
12. Sloane Stephens — 238
13. Amanda Anisimova — 230

U.S. athletes qualified for 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The U.S. Olympic team roster for the 2020 Tokyo Games will eventually reach more than 500 athletes. It is currently at seven.

Qualifying competitions and Olympic Trials events dot the schedule from now into early summer 2020.

Athletes qualified so far:

Modern Pentathlon
Samantha Achterberg
Amro Elgeziry

Sport Climbing
Brooke Raboutou

Swimming
Haley Anderson
Ashley Twichell
Jordan Wilimovsky

Triathlon
Summer Rappaport

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Tokyo 2020 Olympic master competition schedule