Stronger Mikaela Shiffrin eyes new goals

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A breathless Mikaela Shiffrin answered the phone and asked to push back an interview with NBC five minutes.

When she called back, she explained the brief delay.

“I’m so sorry,” she said. “I was at the gym and I was trying to finish one last set before we spoke.”

Strength training is a newfound priority for the 21-year-old skier.

Shiffrin has traditionally focused on the technical disciplines, slalom and giant slalom, which require agility for quick turning. Now she is expanding her portfolio to include the speed disciplines, super-G and downhill, which require isometric strength to hold the tuck position longer and deeper.

Shiffrin’s first priority this season remains competing in the technical disciplines, which she calls “my babies.” The 2014 Olympic slalom champion is looking to claim her fourth World Cup crystal globe in slalom this season.

Gaining experience in the speed disciplines is her second priority.

Shiffrin said she is “90% of the way there” with the speed disciplines, largely because of the extra time she spent in the gym. She suffered a knee injury last December that kept her out two months. Told to stay off her skis, Shiffrin focused on lifting weights.

“I’ve never been this strong,” said Shiffrin, who is “100% healthy” and not planning on wearing a knee brace this season. “Not that it is ideal to have to do conditioning in the middle of the winter, but I feel like that gave me a little bit of a head start for the summer conditioning months.”

To get the final “10% of the way there,” Shiffrin believes she needs to become more familiar with the terrain at speed races.

“For most of the annual spots where the girls ski every single year, I haven’t raced or even seen those hills,” Shiffrin said. “That’s where my confidence falters a little bit.”

Since the technical disciplines remain Shiffrin’s top priority, she will only enter speed races when it fits in her schedule. For example, she is undecided about racing in the season-opening speed event in Lake Louise, where downhill training starts just two days after a slalom race in Killington.

“I don’t want to sacrifice anything in Killington because I am stressed about getting to Lake Louise for the first training runs,” she said.

Shiffrin’s third priority is to contend for the overall World Cup title. To do so, she will need to “perform better than I ever have in every single [technical] race” and then get “bonus points” by performing well in super-G and downhill.

“I won’t know where I stand with the overall [crystal] globe until at least mid-season,” she said. “If I’m close, then maybe it will become more of a priority.”

The competition for the overall World Cup title is expected to be tougher this season than in 2015-2016, when Shiffrin believes “it definitely would have been possible” to challenge for the overall World Cup title had she not gotten injured.

Anna Veith and Lindsey Vonn are expected to return from injuries, along with the possible return from break of Tina Maze, to challenge last season’s World Cup overall champion, Lara Gut.

“Everybody is back,” Shiffrin said.

Vonn wrote on social media last month that she is not going for the World Cup overall title, but Shiffrin is not ruling her out.

“[Vonn] is going to be in contention for the overall as well, whether or not that is her goal,” Shiffrin said. “That is similar to where I’m at. It’s not my main goal, but it’s very possible that if I perform how I hope to in each event, it will be there.”

Vonn is known as the “Speed Queen,” with eight downhill and five super-G World Cup titles. But Shiffrin has not asked Vonn for advice about the speed disciplines, preferring to simply watch Vonn ski.

“That is advice enough,” Shiffrin said. “She doesn’t need to tell me anything.”

The World Cup season starts Oct. 22 in Soelden. The anticipation reminds Shiffrin of when she made her World Cup debut in 2011 at the age of 15.

“I was starting to feel like a veteran on slalom and getting there in giant slalom,” Shiffrin said. “But now that I’m starting to add more speed, I’m back to being the rookie again.”

MORE: Lindsey Vonn clarifies joke about J.J. Watt

Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champ in 1984, runs London Marathon at 65

Joan Benoit Samuelson
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Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion in 1984, ran her first 26.2-mile race in three years at Sunday’s London Marathon and won her age group.

Benoit Samuelson, 65, clocked 3 hours, 20 minutes, 20 seconds to top the women’s 65-69 age group by 7 minutes, 52 seconds. She took pleasure in being joined in the race by daughter Abby, who crossed in 2:58:19.

“She may have beaten me with my replacement knee, but everybody said I wouldn’t do it! I will never say never,” Benoit Samuelson said, according to race organizers. “I am a grandmother now to Charlotte, and it’s my goal to run 5K with her.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Benoit Samuelson raced the 1987 Boston Marathon while three months pregnant with Abby. Before that, she won the first Olympic women’s marathon at the 1984 Los Angeles Games, plus the Boston Marathon in 1979 and 1983 and the Chicago Marathon in 1985.

Her personal best — 2:21:21 — still holds up. She ranks sixth in U.S. women’s history.

Benoit Samuelson plans to race the Tokyo Marathon to complete her set of doing all six annual World Marathon Majors. The others are Berlin, Boston, Chicago and New York City.

“I’m happy to finish this race and make it to Tokyo, but I did it today on a wing and a prayer,” she said, according to organizers. “I’m blessed to have longevity in this sport. It doesn’t owe me anything, but I feel I owe my sport.”

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Kenenisa Bekele still eyes Eliud Kipchoge’s marathon world record, but a duel must wait

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LONDON — Kenenisa Bekele made headlines last week by declaring “of course I am the best” long distance runner ever. But the Ethiopian was fifth-best at Sunday’s London Marathon, finishing 74 seconds behind Kenya’s Amos Kipruto.

Bekele, 40, clocked 2:05:53, the fastest-ever marathon by a runner 40 years or older. He was with the lead pack until being dropped in the 21st mile.

But Bekele estimated he could have run 90 to 120 seconds faster had he not missed parts of six weeks of training with hip and joint injuries.

“I expect better even if the preparation is short,” he said. “I know my talent and I know my capacity, but really I couldn’t achieve what I expect.”

Bekele is the second-fastest marathoner in history behind Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge, who broke his own world record by clocking 2:01:09 at the Berlin Marathon last week.

“I am happy when I see Eliud Kipchoge run that time,” Bekele said. “It motivates all athletes who really expect to do the same thing.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Bekele’s best time was within two seconds of Kipchoge’s previous world record (2:01:39). He described breaking Kipchoge’s new mark as the “main goal” for the rest of his career.

“Yes, I hope, one day it will happen, of course,” Bekele said. “With good preparation, I don’t know when, but we will see one more time.”

Nobody has won more London Marathons than Kipchoge, a four-time champion who set the course record (2:02:37) in 2019. But the two-time Olympic marathon champion did not run this year in London, as elite marathoners typically choose to enter one race each spring and fall.

Bekele does not know which race he will enter in the spring. But it will not be against Kipchoge.

“I need to show something first,” Bekele said. “I need to run a fast time. I have to check myself. This is not enough.”

Kipchoge will try to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles at the Paris Games. Bekele, who will be 42 in 2024, has not committed to trying to qualify for the Ethiopian team.

“There’s a long time to go before Paris,” Bekele said. “At this moment I am not decided. I have to show something.”

So who is the greatest long distance runner ever?

Bekele can make a strong case on the track:

Bekele
Four Olympic medals (three gold)
Six World Championship medals (five gold)
Former 5000m and 10,000m world-record holder

Kipchoge
Two Olympic medals
Two World Championship medals (one gold)

But Kipchoge can make a strong case on the pavement:

Bekele
Second-fastest marathoner in history
Two World Marathon Major victories

Kipchoge
Four of the five best marathon times in history
Two-time Olympic marathon champion
12 World Marathon Major victories

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