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Hillary Clinton has extensive Olympic history

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Hillary Clinton has done all of these things:

Attended a Summer Olympics
Attended a Winter Olympics
Gave a speech at an Olympic torch relay lighting at Olympia, Greece
Gave a speech at an IOC Olympic host-city vote session

Clinton is an “Olympics nut,” her then-press secretary, Lisa Caputo, said in 1996, according to USA Today.

As First Lady, Clinton traveled to the 1994 Lillehammer Winter Games and the 1996 Atlanta Games.

In 1994, Clinton was most noticed for attending the men’s downhill in Kvitfjell, bearing freezing temperatures near the finish line with Olympic sprint gold medalist Florence Griffith-Joyner.

American Tommy Moe was the surprise race winner. Last month, Moe was asked about meeting Clinton in the finish area.

“We took a photo, and she was just really unassuming and just like, ‘Congratulations, this is my [13-year-old] daughter, Chelsea,'” Moe said at the U.S. Ski Team’s Gold Medal Gala fundraiser on Wall Street. “I was on the cover of [Sports Illustrated], and they had a photo of us [in the magazine]. … I think Florence Griffith-Joyner was freezing her butt off, because it was definitely five degrees below zero.”

Moe said he later received a call from President Bill Clinton, who was not in Norway, and answered the phone with the greeting, “Hey Bill, how’s it going?”

In March 1996, Clinton flew to Greece to and spoke at the beginning of the Atlanta Olympic torch relay at the ancient Olympic site of Olympia.

“These Olympic Games, which have moved princes to lift peasants onto their shoulders, emphasize an inescapable dimension of the human experience — that we are all members of one global family,” Clinton said in Olympia, according to The Associated Press.

In July, she attended the Opening Ceremony in Atlanta, where her husband declared the Games open. Clinton and Trump were both at Centennial Olympic Stadium that night.

She later took in the action, including swimming (where she had her photo taken with the U.S. women’s 4x200m freestyle relay team), gymnastics (photo with the Magnificent Seven) and diving (sat next to Carl Lewis).

Finally in 2005, Clinton, then a U.S. Senator in New York, spoke at the IOC session that would determine the 2012 Olympic host city.

She was part of the New York City 2012 Olympic bid team, flanked by Olympic champions Oksana Baiul, Nadia Comaneci, Bob Beamon and Ian Thorpe. New York City would finish fourth out of five cities in the voting won by London.

For her 2016 presidential campaign, Clinton brought on two-time Olympic medalist figure skater Michelle Kwan as a surrogate outreach coordinator. Kwan detailed her job here.

MORE: LA 2024 comments on Trump election

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals