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Chess deserves Olympic priority over esports, World Chess CEO says

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NEW YORK — Chess is still aiming for Olympic inclusion, in either the Summer or Winter Games and as early as 2022, and one of the sport’s senior officials says the board game deserves priority over esports.

“Well, chess is considered a sport, officially,” World Chess CEO Ilya Merenzon said on the eve of the World Chess Championship in Manhattan on Thursday.

Merenzon was pointing to the fact that chess’ international federation is recognized by the International Olympic Committee and that esports are not. IOC recognition is the first, early step toward potential Olympic inclusion. Around 30 international federations for sports that aren’t currently in the Olympics are recognized by the IOC, including American football (provisionally), life saving and tug of war.

“I think esports could also be very, very deserving,” Merenzon said. “Just that maybe chess should be first because it was around for a long, long time, like 5,000 years [smiles]. Esports are a little bit younger. It would be fair to look at age and stuff like that.”

Chess has been around for about 2,000 years, according to World Chess’ website.

Merenzon’s comments came one week after esports made Olympic news after a press release from the Los Angeles 2024 Olympic bid committee.

“We view esports’ immense global popularity and continued advances in digital technologies as tremendous tools for reconnecting millennials with the Olympic movement,” Los Angeles 2024 Olympic bid chairman Casey Wasserman said in the release. “L.A. 2024 will work to ensure technology enhances young people’s sports experiences, instead of replacing them, and becomes a platform for further popularizing Olympic and Paralympic sports.”

Since chess was recognized by the IOC in 1999, the sport and many others have repeatedly applied for and been denied Olympic program inclusion. In 2000, a chess exhibition was held at the Sydney Olympics. Merenzon would like to see another chess exhibition at the site of one of the next few Olympics.

Merenzon said recent attempts have pushed for blitz chess, a faster form of the sport, to join the Olympics. World Chess is also seeing if the Olympic Charter language could be changed to allow a sport that isn’t played on snow or ice into the Winter Games.

Merenzon would prefer chess in the Summer Olympics, but he’s open to any way to get in. Previously, sport officials reportedly said that chess pieces could be made out of ice to conform to the Olympic Charter language for winter sports.

In a press conference Thursday, Merenzon stressed the sport’s global popularity, which is one of the keys for Olympic inclusion. He mentioned it being immensely popular in Armenia and Azerbaijan as well as in the countries of the World Chess Championship players — Norway’s Magnus Carlsen and Russia’s Sergey Karyakin.

“[Chess] is much more on TV than curling,” Merenzon said, smiling.

MORE: Football must spread to join Olympics, IOC president says

Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”