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IOC: Rio Olympics were ‘perfect imperfect Games’

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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — A few months after the closing ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, IOC officials have a new tagline for South America’s first Olympics: “The most perfect imperfect Games.”

The International Olympic Committee held a news conference on Tuesday to accentuate the positives of the Rio Games, which were held amid Brazil’s political and economic crisis and experienced problems with empty seats, budget cuts, green water and other organizational issues.

“The Games worked,” said Christophe Dubi, the IOC’s executive director of the Olympic Games. “Were they perfect? No. The organizers faced immense difficulties. But, in the end, you have to take your hat off. It’s extraordinary what they have delivered.”

The IOC has been going out of its way to publicly defend the Rio Games, seeking to blunt any lasting criticism and encourage potential future host cities at a time when many have been turning away because of concerns over high costs.

“As you remember in the lead-up to the Games, we are all going to die of Zika or poisoned water or we were all going to be mugged in the streets,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams said. “As it turns out we find out that the Games were the most universal, the most consumed ever.”

“Were they perfect Games?” he added. “No. Someone described them as the most perfect imperfect Games, which I think is actually quite a good characterization. There were problems, but what is fantastic is the way those problems were overcome.”

The IOC released a stream of facts and figures to showcase the success of the Games, including global broadcast figures, record number of national Olympic committees, the first ever refugee team and performances by stars such as Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps and Mo Farah.

Dubi insisted the Olympic venues would all have long-term use and that the city had been transformed with a new transport system and other infrastructure improvements.

Dubi said the organizing committee’s final operational budget — the cost of running the Games, not the construction or infrastructure spending — would be announced in the next few weeks and would come in close to the original $2.9 billion figure.

“We had glitches,” Dubi said. “But when everyone comes back with a big smile, you know the Games have been a success.”

MORE: Rio Olympics the top Twitter trend of 2016

2020 French Open women’s singles draw, results

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If Serena Williams is to win a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title at the French Open, she may have to go through her older sister in the fourth round.

Williams, the sixth seed, could play Venus Williams in the round of 16 at Roland Garros, which begins Sunday.

Serena opens against countrywoman Kristie Ahn, whom she beat in the first round at the U.S. Open. Serena could then get her U.S. Open quarterfinal opponent, fellow mom Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, in the second round.

If Venus is to reach the fourth round, she must potentially get past U.S. Open runner-up Victoria Azarenka in the second round. Azarenka beat Serena in the U.S. Open semifinals, ending the American’s latest bid to tie Margaret Court‘s major titles record.

Venus lost in the French Open first round the last two years.

The French Open top seed is 2018 champion Simona Halep, who could play 2019 semifinalist Amanda Anisimova in the third round.

Coco Gauff, the rising 16-year-old American, gets 2019 semifinalist Jo Konta of Great Britain in the first round in the same quarter of the draw as Halep.

The field lacks defending champion Ash Barty of Australia, not traveling due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Also out: U.S. Open winner Naomi Osaka, citing a sore hamstring and tight turnaround from prevailing in New York two weeks ago.

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2020 French Open men’s singles draw, results

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Rafael Nadal was put into the same half of the French Open draw as fellow 2018 and 2019 finalist Dominic Thiem of Austria, with top-ranked Novak Djokovic catching a break.

Nadal, trying to tie Roger Federer‘s male record 20 Grand Slam singles titles, could play sixth-seeded German Alexander Zverev in the quarterfinals before a potential clash with Thiem, who just won the U.S. Open.

Djokovic, who is undefeated in 2020 save being defaulted out of the U.S. Open, could play No. 7 seed Matteo Berrettini of Italy in the quarterfinals before a possible semifinal with Russian Daniil Medvedev.

Medvedev is the fourth seed but is 0-3 at the French Open. Another possible Djokovic semifinal opponent is fifth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece, who reached the fourth round last year.

The most anticipated first-round matchup is between three-time major champion Andy Murray and 2015 French Open champion Stan Wawrinka. In Murray’s most recent French Open match, he lost in five sets to Wawrinka in the 2017 semifinals.

FRENCH OPEN DRAWS: Men | Women | TV Schedule

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