Torin Yater-Wallace
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Torin Yater-Wallace healthy going into X Games after years of health scares

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U.S. Olympic halfpipe skier Torin Yater-Wallace‘s last three Winter X Games in Aspen:

2014: Pulled out before the final while still recovering from a collapsed lung and two broken ribs suffered in separate fall 2013 incidents.
2015: Pulled out after suffering a concussion in a practice-week crash.
2016: Finished fifth, two weeks after being cleared to ski following an infection that affected his gall bladder, liver and lungs and put him on life support (which has been well documented).

“I’ve had a few years with this certain event that, for some reason, somebody doesn’t want me to compete there healthy,” Yater-Wallace said last week. “I’m not exactly one to set goals very often. I just want to compete and ski as best as I can and be happy with my performance. If I can do that, I would hope I get a good result.”

Yater-Wallace has endured more health scares than just about any other 21-year-old Olympian.

Before the setbacks, he was a teen sensation, making the X Games podium in 2011, 2012 and 2013, winning the Sochi Olympic test event and taking silver at the 2013 World Championships.

Though Yater-Wallace missed most of the 2013-14 season with the broken ribs and collapsed lung, he was still named to the Olympic team due to his international record. Less than 100 percent, Yater-Wallace fell on both of his qualifying runs in a rain-drenched Sochi halfpipe and finished 26th out of 28 skiers.

Neither of his next two seasons were smooth. But this year, he’s stayed in good health.

“When something like that happens, you really get a new appreciation for everyday life and the life that I’ve been fortunate enough to be living as a professional skier,” Yater-Wallace said, emphasizing the most recent and life-threatening scare, the infection a little over a year ago. “That first day, week and month of skiing, following me becoming healthy after that, I just had such a great smile on my face every day I was in the mountains, as cliché as it might sound as a skier, being happy, smiling in the mountains. It really was the only way I can describe it. It was amazing to be outside and breathing fresh air, not confined to the white walls of a hospital.”

After a month and a half back on skis, Yater-Wallace capped his comeback by winning X Games Oslo last February.

“I never appreciated a podium or a win at an event like I did that day,” said Yater-Wallace, who sees special breathing doctors monthly and uses an inhaler daily. “It felt like such a gift.”

He beat all of the world’s best halfpipe skiers in Oslo — Aspen X Games champion Kevin Rolland of France, Olympic champion David Wise and Gus Kenworthy, who competes in halfpipe and slopestyle and might just be the world’s best freestyle skier.

He’ll face them again Friday night in Aspen.

“We almost lost a friend last year,” Wise said last fall. “When you’re put through something like that, you get a new lease on life, and it makes you just that much more grateful to be around. That’s what I saw in Torin last year, and I think it’s going to contribute to his success as a skier. He’s not focused on the petty things anymore. He almost died last year.”

MORE: Mark McMorris, after horrible injury, eyes 2 Olympic golds

Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”