Shaun White
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Shaun White has worst X Games finish since 2000

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Shaun White finished 11th at the Winter X Games on Thursday night, his worst halfpipe result at the event since his debut at age 13 in 2000.

The two-time Olympic halfpipe champion was unable to notch a clean run in two attempts, both times losing all of his momentum after failing to fully rotate and land one of his tricks. White’s best score was a 29.66, placing 11th out of 12 riders.

Australian Olympian Scotty James won with a 90-point run featuring back-to-back double cork 1080s, according to ESPN. Full results are here.

White was considered a medal favorite in his X Games return after missing last year’s event due to a dispute with organizers.

He won both of his contests in the 2015-16 season, including notching his biggest air out of the halfpipe of his career at the U.S. Open last March.

White did, though, have offseason ankle surgery and failed to make the final at his only other contest this season, using a Grand Prix at Copper Mountain, Colo., as a “test run” in December.

White, 30, wasn’t quite at the form Thursday required to win his ninth X Games halfpipe title and first since 2013. He nearly matched James in soaring 21 feet above the halfpipe. He tried a new trick in his first run, a switch frontside double cork 1440, according to ESPN, but was unable to pull it off.

VIDEO: White’s first run | White’s second run

White’s biggest rivals struggled, too.

The 2014 and 2015 X Games champion Danny Davis was fifth, Olympic silver medalist Ayumu Hirano was ninth and Olympic champion Iouri Podladtchikov was 10th.

White is expected to compete next week at his home pipe at Mammoth Mountain, Calif.

Also Thursday, 16-year-old U.S. Olympic hopeful Hailey Langlund won snowboard big air by becoming the first woman to land a double cork at the X Games, according to ESPN.

Olympic slopestyle champion Jamie Anderson was fourth. Big air makes its Olympic debut in PyeongChang.

MORE: Mark McMorris ups risk for 2 golds in PyeongChang

*Correction: An earlier version of this post incorrectly stated that the U.S. Grand Prix at Mammoth Mountain, Calif., in February is an Olympic qualifier. It is for ski and snowboard slopestyle and snowboard slopestyle, but not snowboard halfpipe.

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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MORE: Five storylines to watch for Tokyo Paralympics

Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals