Los Angeles 2024
LA 2024

Los Angeles 2024 Olympic projected ticket prices, venue map in bid book

Leave a comment

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles Olympic planners competing for the 2024 Games promised Thursday to help restore credibility and stability to the international sports festival as the world enters an era of uncertainty.

In documents submitted to the International Olympic Committee — known in Olympic parlance as the “Bid Book” — the privately run group known as LA2024 said it had crafted a “no surprises” plan that will closely watch the financial bottom line.

“The world is entering an era of unprecedented change and uncertainty,” the Los Angeles organizers wrote. “The 2024 Games must help restore the credibility of the Games, ensure financial stability for the Olympic movement and create new opportunities to engage with young people around the world.”

The $5.3 billion proposal includes housing most athletes at UCLA and using the planned NFL stadium in Inglewood that is expected to be completed in 2019.

The IOC is set to award the 2024 Olympics in September. Los Angeles is a finalist, along with Paris and Budapest, Hungary.

Los Angeles hosted the 1932 and 1984 Olympics.

The documents were released as questions linger about President Donald Trump‘s executive order temporarily banning refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The government has told the U.S. Olympic Committee that the ban shouldn’t impact athletes traveling to the U.S. for international events.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said earlier this week that he’s confident the IOC will evaluate the bid on its merits.

The proposal projects that Los Angeles would be able to fill seats at Olympic venues.

The millions of sporting-event tickets that are sold annually in Southern California, and the billions of dollars spent on such tickets nationally, provide “ready-made databases of target audiences,” organizers said.

But it will come at a cost.

Average seat prices vary widely but a spot at the Opening Ceremony would average nearly $1,800, the document said.

But an average ticket price for a less-in-demand event like golfing preliminaries would go for $13.

After anxiety over taxpayer costs helped cripple Boston’s 2024 Olympic bid, organizers in stand-in Los Angeles have made its tight budget a highlight of its proposal. It requires no new construction of permanent venues, instead relying on existing structures and arenas, all serving the IOC mandate for less-expensive Games that require less new construction.

Over the years Olympics have been notorious for cost overruns, and studies have questioned if host cities benefit economically. Russia has struggled with costs from the 2014 Sochi Olympics, which have been called the most expensive Olympics of all time.

In Rio de Janeiro last year, the spreading health crisis of the mosquito-born Zika virus kept some athletes away, promises to clean up Rio’s filthy waters remained unfulfilled and the heavy financial bill made them unpopular with many in Brazil.

Acknowledging the negative stories that surrounded the lead-up to past Olympics, the Los Angeles bid promised “compelling new Olympic narratives around fiscal responsibility, community partnerships, world-leading sustainability, youth engagement across diverse cultures, celebrity endorsement and new technologies.”

A new prong of the Los Angeles plan calls for creating a satellite village at the University of California, Riverside, for athletes who would compete in rowing events at Lake Perris.

And in a city synonymous with clogged freeways, the Los Angeles proposal set a bold, and maybe unrealistic, goal: Bring 100 percent of ticketed spectators to competition sites by public transportation or systems designed for spectators, such as shuttle buses.

Here is the full list of venues:

Downtown
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum — Opening/Closing Ceremonies, Track and Field
Dedeaux Field — Diving, Swimming, Synchronized Swimming
Staples Center — Basketball
Los Angeles Convention Center — Basketball, Boxing, Fencing, Table Tennis, Taekwondo
LA Football Club — Soccer (preliminaries)
USC’s Galen Center — Badminton
Microsoft Theater — Weightlifting
Grand Park/LA City Hall — Race Walk, Marathon, Road Cycling

Inglewood
LA Stadium at Hollywood Park (NFL stadium) — Opening/Closing Ceremonies, Archery
The Forum — Gymnastics

South Bay
StubHub Stadium — Modern Pentathlon, Rugby
StubHub Center Fields — Field Hockey
StubHub Tennis Center — Tennis
VELO Sports Center — Track Cycling
Long Beach-BMX — BMX

Long Beach
Long Beach Waterfront — Open-Water Swimming, Triathlon
Long Beach-Water Polo — Water Polo
Long Beach Arena — Handball
Long Beach Pier — Sailing

Olympic Village
UCLA’s Pauley Pavilion — Judo, Wrestling

Valley
Sepulveda Basin — Canoe Slalom, Equestrian, Shooting

Other Venues
Rose Bowl — Soccer (finals)
Santa Monica Beach — Beach Volleyball
Riviera Country Club — Golf
Honda Center — Volleyball
Bonelli Park — Mountain Bike
Lake Perris — Canoe Sprint, Rowing

MORE: 2024 Olympic bidding news

la-2024-venue-map

tickets4

tickets3

Olympian Tasha Schwikert says she is a Larry Nassar survivor, speaks out on Steve Penny

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Tasha Schwikert is at least the ninth Olympian to come forward as a Larry Nassar survivor.

“After months of grappling with the decision, I have decided to come forward as a victim of Larry Nassar,” was tweeted from the 2000 Olympic bronze medalist Schwikert’s account. “I want to join my former teammates and fellow survivors to help enact REAL change at @USAGym and @TeamUSA. #MeToo.

“I refuse to remain a victim. It is time for @USAGym and @TeamUSA to come clean and be held accountable for the toxic environment that enabled Nassar’s abuse. Only then will we see REAL change.”

Schwikert, now 33, was the youngest woman on the 2000 Olympic team across all sports, the U.S. all-around champion in 2001 and 2002, the 2003 World champion team captain and an alternate for the 2004 Olympic team.

Schwikert also said that ex-USA Gymnastics president and CEO Steve Penny pressed her to publicly support USA Gymnastics at the height of the Nassar scandal, according to ABC’s “World News Tonight.”

Penny was arrested Wednesday and indicted on charges he tampered with evidence in the Nassar sexual-assault investigation and on Thursday banned for life from USA Gymnastics. Penny’s lawyers said he is “confident that when all the facts are known it will be shown that he did nothing criminal.”

“Steve had always manipulated all of us, really, but I felt indebted to him,” Schwikert said on ABC. “Him and USA Gymnastics made me feel like if it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be the person or the athlete who I was.”

She is at least the second member of the Sydney 2000 team to come forward as a Nassar survivor, joining Jamie Dantzscher, the first Olympian to do so in February 2017.

USA Gymnastics posted a statement from Schwikert on social media the night Dantzscher’s first interview aired, saying, “As a member of the national team from 1999-2004, I firmly believe USA Gymnastics always had my health and well-being top of mind. The program provided me with the resources and experiences that helped me achieve my goals.”

Penny resigned a month later.

Seven of the eight members of the 2012 or 2016 Olympic women’s artistic gymnastics teams have also come forward — Simone BilesGabby Douglas, Aly RaismanMcKayla MaroneyJordyn WieberKyla Ross and Madison Kocian. As have world championships team members among the hundreds of girls and women who said Nassar sexually abused them under the guise of medical treatment when he worked for Michigan State and USA Gymnastics.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Madison Hubbell, Zach Donohue can make it 10 straight at Skate America

Getty Images
Leave a comment

If Madison Hubbell and Zach Donohue ever lacked motivation in the post-Olympic summer, they needed only scan their Montreal training ice.

They would spot France’s Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron, the only ice dancers from the Olympic podium who return this season. Papadakis and Cizeron relegated the Americans to silver at March’s world championships, one month after Hubbell and Donohue were fourth in PyeongChang (the French took silver). They have trained under the same coaches in Quebec for three years.

They would also see Madison Chock and Evan Bates and Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker, the third- and fourth-place finishers from January’s U.S. Championships. Those couples moved to the Montreal group in the spring. They are Hubbell and Donohue’s top threats to repeat as national champions in Detroit in three months, given U.S. silver medalists Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani are also taking a break.

Practicing next to rivals is often shunned in sports. It has elevated ice dance the last several years.

Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir and Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White trained together in Michigan and split the Olympic gold and silver medals in 2010 and 2014.

When Virtue and Moir returned from a two-year break in 2016, they joined the Montreal group and went one-two with training partners Papadakis and Cizeron at every major competition through PyeongChang.

Hubbell and Donohue thrived last season, their third in Montreal, winning their first national title after six straight years of finishing third or fourth. They were in position for an Olympic medal, third after the short dance, but Donohue fell in the free dance (as he did at 2017 Worlds after they were third in the short).

Then at worlds in March, they delivered back-to-back podium-worthy performances on the global stage for the first time for that silver medal. They are the world No. 2 and the favorites at this weekend’s Skate America, with the French not in the field.

U.S. couples have won nine straight Skate Americas, more than the other three disciplines combined in the last decade.

MORE: Skate America TV/Stream Schedule

“Clearly this formula is working for them,” NBC Sports analyst and 2006 Olympic ice dance silver medalist Tanith White said. “It has proven to work for many of the greatest teams in ice dance over the last few decades. … I cannot see a drawback.”

Hubbell and Donohue (and Papadakis and Cizeron) appear to agree.

They joked back and forth at a press conference after worlds in March. Asked how they would spend the offseason, Cizeron looked straight at Hubbell and Donohue and said, jokingly, “Our goal is to get drunk together as many times as we can.”

“As much as our own personal accomplishment is pretty incredible, being on the podium with training mates and having, literally, everyone from our training center skate the best programs of their season, all at the same competition, was pretty incredible,” Donohue said last week.

Hubbell and Donohue should breeze through Skate America in Everett, Wash. Nobody else from the top nine in PyeongChang is in the field. They’re the favorites next week at Skate Canada, too.

The first real test will be at December’s Grand Prix Final, where Papadakis and Cizeron should join them. Hubbell and Donohue never outscored the French in nine head-to-head competitions and were more than 10 points adrift at worlds.

“The French, where they left off last season, I think that they are still in a category on their own based on the last time we saw those two teams go up against each other,” White said. 

Hubbell said the world silver medal showed that they had tackled their demons, fear and history of errors. If the next goal is gold, they must conquer a much more visible foe, one they see every day on the ice.

“The podium at worlds,” Hubbell said, “was the moment I was able to leave that season behind me and go into the future.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Gracie Gold details ‘mental health crisis,’ return to skating