10 peculiar PyeongChang Olympic hopeful stories

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Here are 10 PyeongChang Olympic hopeful stories that range from unique to extremely strange:

Sabrina Simader, Alpine Skiing, Kenya
The first Kenyan Alpine skier to race in the World Cup or at the world championships and, potentially, at the Olympics. Simader moved to Austria at age 3, where she learned to ski.

Joanne Reid, Biathlon, USA
The daughter of 1980 Olympic speed skating bronze medalist Beth Heiden, which makes her the niece of Eric Heiden, who swept all five speed skating golds at Lake Placid 1980. Reid ranks second among U.S. women in World Cup points this season.

Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian, Bobsled, Jamaica
The 2014 U.S. Olympian could become the first Jamaican Olympic female bobsled driver after switching to represent the nation of her father’s birth. Fenlator-Victorian earned bronze in a lower-level North American Cup race last month, improving her international ranking for Olympic qualifying.

Sam McGuffie, Bobsled, USA
The latest athlete to attempt the transition from pro football to the Olympics. McGuffie was a YouTube sensation in high school, his highlight videos amassing more than one million views. He went on to play running back at the University of Michigan and bounced around NFL teams, but never played a regular-season game. He took up bobsled in 2015 and has become a mainstay push athlete on the top U.S. sled, a good sign for his PyeongChang prospects.

Luis Moreira, Bobsled, USA
Moreira served six years in the U.S. Army, then earned the title of Texas State Bodybuilding Champion in 2014 before turning to bobsledding in 2015. This season, he has become a regular push athlete for U.S. sleds in World Cup races.

Beau-JamesBryonJackson and Jossi Wells, Freestyle Skiing, New Zealand
Yes, it’s possible that four brothers could compete at the same Winter Olympics (it has happened before, via OlympStats.com). Last season, Beau-James and Bryon ranked in the top 22 in the World Cup halfpipe standings, while Jackson and Jossi made the top 17 in the World Cup slopestyle standings. Beau-James is the biggest question, as he’s been out since July knee surgery. Beau-James and Jossi competed in Sochi.

Mac Bohonnon/Kiley McKinnon, Freestyle Skiing, USA
They were first-grade classmates at Island Avenue Elementary School in Madison, Conn. Bohonnon started aerials first, then convinced McKinnon in a Facebook message to try the sport. They both won the World Cup season title in 2015.

Matt Dalton, Hockey, South Korea
South Korea’s No. 1 goalie is one of several athletes being naturalized in advance of its home Olympics. South Korea received an automatic place in the Olympic men’s hockey field as host nation, but it doesn’t have much of a talent pool. Retired NHL defenseman Jim Paek, the only South Korean-born Stanley Cup winner, is the coach. Dalton was born in Ontario, played NCAA hockey at Bemidji State, was briefly a Boston Bruin in 2010 and now plays in South Korea’s league.

Nathan Crumpton, Skeleton, USA
Born in Nairobi, competed in track and field at Princeton, an award-winning photographer and appeared as a snowboarder in a McDonald’s commercial that aired during the Sochi Olympics. The No. 2 U.S. men’s skeleton slider this World Cup season.

Noriaki Kasai, Ski Jumping, Japan
44 years old. Seeking a record-breaking eighth Winter Olympic appearance after earning his first individual medal in Sochi (silver, large hill). The top Japanese jumper this season, ranking No. 23 in the World Cup standings.

PYEONGCHANG 2018
Storylines | 18 US Stars | 18 Global Stars | Strange Olympic Hopefuls | Key events
Oldest US Olympian? | Youngest US Olympian? | Venue Photo Gallery | North Korea

*Correction: An earlier version of this post incorrectly labeled the Wells brothers as Australian.

April Ross, Alix Klineman back atop Olympic beach volleyball qualifying

April Ross, Alix Klineman
FIVB World Tour
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Two-time Olympic medalist April Ross and new partner Alix Klineman moved back on top of the U.S. Olympic beach volleyball qualifying standings by winning an event in Itapema, Brazil this week.

Ross, who split from Kerri Walsh Jennings in 2017, and Klineman beat Canadians Sarah Pavan and Melissa Humana-Paredes 25-23, 18-21, 15-10 in Sunday’s final for their third title in 11 FIVB World Tour tournaments together.

“Every victory is important, but this counts for more,” Klineman said, according to the FIVB. “We want to send a message and we want to be consistently the best.

Ross and Klineman supplanted Walsh Jennings and her new partner, Brooke Sweat, for the lead in the early U.S. Olympic qualifying rankings with still more than a year of events ahead.

1. Ross/Klineman – 3,240 (5 events played)
2. Walsh Jennings/Sweat – 3,100 (7 events)
3. Day/Flint – 2,180 (5 events)
4. Hughes/Ross — 2,000 (4 events)
5. Larsen/Stockman — 1,840 (5 events)
6. Sponcil/Claes — 1,600 (3 events)

Each team’s 12 best results from Sept. 1, 2018, to June 14, 2020, go into the Olympic qualifying rankings. That means Ross and Klineman are comfortably in front, having played two fewer events than Walsh Jennings and Sweat, who lost in the quarterfinals in Itapema.

The top two U.S. pairs come June 15, 2020, provided they’re ranked high enough internationally, will qualify for Tokyo. Most of the qualifying events, including the ones with the most points available, are still to come this summer.

Ross, 36, picked up Klineman, 29, after Walsh Jennings didn’t join her in signing a domestic AVP contract in 2017. The 6-foot-5 Klineman primarily played indoor the previous decade, including at Stanford from 2007-10 after being the Gatorade National Player of the Year coming out of high school.

MORE: Brazil volleyball star faints during courtside interview

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Katie Ledecky extends 5-year win streak

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Katie Ledecky extended a five-year domestic win streak by taking the 200m freestyle at the Tyr Pro Swim Series at Bloomington on Saturday.

In her last full meet before July’s world championships, Ledecky clocked 1:55.80 to beat training partner Simone Manuel by 1.44 seconds for her second win in as many days. Ledecky is also entered in Sunday’s 800m free on the last day of the meet.

Ledecky, who also cruised to a 400m free victory on Friday, ranks third in the world in the 200m free this year, behind Australian Ariarne Titmus and Swede Sarah Sjöström (the Olympic silver medalist who is not expected to race the 200m free at worlds).

Ledecky, a five-time Olympic champion, hasn’t lost a 200m, 400m, 800m or 1500m free final at a domestic meet since Allison Schmitt beat her in a 200m free on Jan. 18, 2014 when Ledecky was 16 years old.

BLOOMINGTON: Full Results

But Ledecky lost the two biggest 200m frees of this Olympic cycle so far, at the 2017 World Championships and the 2018 Pan Pacific Championships. Italian veteran Federica Pellegrini handed Ledecky her first individual final defeat at a major international meet at 2017 Worlds.

Ledecky dropped to third in the 200m free at Pan Pacs in Tokyo last year, beaten by younger swimmers Taylor Ruck of Canada and Rikako Ikee of Japan.

Ruck, who like Ledecky trains at Stanford, is in Bloomington, but she chose not to swim the 200m free on Saturday. She instead swam the 200m backstroke about 45 minutes after the 200m free and was upset by 17-year-old Regan Smith. Smith won in 2:06.47, moving to No. 3 in the world this year.

In other events Saturday, Ella Eastin captured the 400m individual medley in 4:37.18, taking 1.25 seconds off her personal best and moving to fifth in the world this year. Eastin is not on the world championships team after an untimely bout with mono before qualifying meets last summer.

Blake Pieroni won the men’s 200m free in 1:47.25. No American ranks in the top 20 in the world this year. World silver medalist Townley Haas did not enter Bloomington.

MORE: Olympic breaststroke champion faces ban for missed drug tests

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