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Chloe Kim, after trip to ER, rides into U.S. Open

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The busiest stretch of Chloe Kim‘s life was interrupted by a trip to the emergency room in South Korea last month.

The 16-year-old U.S. snowboarding phenom had “a pretty gnarly cold” and fever right before practice started at a World Cup event at the 2018 Olympic venue in South Korea.

Kim, whose parents are from South Korea and is fluent in Korean, said she couldn’t understand any further diagnosis from a doctor. But she spent two days in the ER.

Kim was discharged and decided to compete at the contest, finishing fourth with an 82.50-point run. Kelly Clark, the three-time Olympic medalist nearly twice Kim’s age, won with 94 points.

Kim is now in Vail, Colo., for this week’s Burton U.S. Open and seems past any health problems.

“I’m hyped,” Kim, typically of few words in interviews, said Wednesday. On Thursday, she topped qualifying with a 79.62-point run heading into Saturday’s final (1 p.m. ET, BurtonUSOpen.com).

The U.S. Open is about as crucial of a contest for Kim outside of an Olympics or Olympic qualifying.

After winning seven straight halfpipe contests from January 2016 to January 2017, Kim has lost her last three outings. (One was the U.S. Grand Prix at Mammoth Mountain, Calif., last month, when Kim qualified second and had to skip the final because it was delayed by a day and she had to fly to South Korea.)

The last month and a half — from losing at Winter X Games in Aspen, Colo., for the first time since she was 13 to Mammoth to South Korea and back to Vail — took a toll on the Olympic halfpipe favorite.

“Traveling can get pretty overwhelming,” said Kim, whose commitments include those for sponsors like Target, Toyota and the South Korean cosmetics brand Laneige. “I haven’t really been this busy before. Now I kind of know what it’s like.”

Kim refuses to dwell on the end of her winning streak. Or on any emphasis put on results, really.

“Honestly, I don’t really care that much about winning,” Kim said, echoing the cry of many riders to come before her. “I’m all about putting down a run I’m happy about. As long as I do that, I’m pretty happy with the way the day goes by.”

The U.S. Open holds special significance to Kim. She debuted in 2013 at age 12, finishing 12th, then placed third in 2014, second in 2015 and won in 2016.

“It’s always special when there’s a contest you’ve been going to for your whole life, almost,” she said.

Kim said she may compete once more this season, possibly at the world championships in Spain next week.

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MORE: Shaun White impressed by Chloe Kim

Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”