Michael Phelps’ old rival praises, questions his doping comments

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Milorad Cavic, who famously lost the 2008 Olympic 100m butterfly to Michael Phelps by .01, made a bit of a splash on social media in a letter to Michael Phelps regarding the American’s recent comments about the anti-doping system.

“Why you’re seeking reform now that you’re retired, and never before supported blood passports, is beyond us all, perhaps even convenient,” was posted on Cavic’s Instagram and Twitter accounts Thursday. “I’m not suggesting you’re a cheat, you’ve gradually improved your times throughout your career, but your recovery rate is nothing short of science fiction… We all just wished we could understand it.”

This wouldn’t be the first time Cavic, a California-born-and-raised Serbian, has not seen eye to eye with Phelps.

Just last year, Cavic said in a film on their controversial 2008 Olympic butterfly finish that, “my gut instinct is that I won.” It wasn’t clear if Cavic was referring to his immediate thoughts after the finish or his attitude eight years on.

Regardless, Cavic also gave Phelps bulletin-board material in 2008 on the eve of that Olympic race, saying that it would be good for the sport if Phelps lost.

Then in 2009, during the height of the high-tech suit era, Cavic jabbed Phelps again, offering to buy Phelps one of his own Arena suits that he deemed superior to Phelps’ Speedos.

Phelps responded by beating Cavic in the 100m butterfly at the world championships. Both swimmers went under the world record. Phelps reacted with arguably the most combative celebration of his career, popping his swimsuit a la college basketball players of the mid-2000s era.

It marked the last of Phelps’ record 29 individual world records.

Phelps went on to win the 100m butterfly at the 2012 Olympics, while Cavic tied for fourth in his final major meet before retiring.

Cavic finished his letter to Phelps on Thursday with conciliatory words for his former rival.

“Anyway, I really do hope that you’ll stick with this, because incase (sic) our sons go pro some day, I’d like to think you made a difference. #NeverTooLate,” he wrote.

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MORE: Le Clos still has nightmares of losing to Michael Phelps in Rio

First Olympic women’s aerials champion Cheryazova dies at 50

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MOSCOW (AP) Lina Cheryazova, the first woman to win an Olympic aerials skiing gold medal, has died. She was 50.

Officials in the Russian city of Novosibirsk, where Cheryazova was living for the last two decades, said she died “following a lengthy illness,” without giving further details.

Competing for Uzbekistan, Cheryazova won gold with a triple flip when aerials skiing debuted on the Olympic program in 1994 in Lillehammer.

Shortly after winning, she learned her mother died three weeks before.

Cheryazova’s career was derailed later that year when she suffered a serious head injury while training in the United States, and spent days in a coma. She retired after failing to qualify for the 1998 Winter Olympics.

More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Clare Egan notches first World Cup podium in biathlon season finale

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In the final biathlon event of the 2018-19 season, American Clare Egan recorded her first career World Cup podium finish, placing third in the mass start in Oslo, Norway. She hit 19 of 20 targets and crossed the finish line 10.4 seconds behind winner Hanna Oberg of Sweden. Norway’s Tiril Eckhoff finished second.

Egan, 31, made her Olympic debut at the 2018 PyeongChang Games, but considered retiring from biathlon at the end of the last season. “I decided that I wanted to do one more year, just for fun, just to see how much I could learn and how good a biathlete I could become,” Egan said in a U.S. Biathlon press release.

Her decision to continue has paid off: since the start of the 2018-19 season, Egan has posted the top eight finishes of her career (including three top-10 results). She concludes the season ranked 18th in the overall World Cup standings.

“I skied much faster this year than I have in the past and I think that was due to finally finding a good balance in my training, between working hard and resting. I did not train more, but the quality was much higher. I’m very excited for the next season,” Egan told U.S. Biathlon.