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Shaun White ends season with comeback U.S. Open win

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Shaun White capped the last season before the PyeongChang Winter Games by beating the rider who had emerged as an Olympic favorite this winter.

White, the 2006 and 2010 Olympic halfpipe champ who finished fourth at Sochi 2014, scored 92.74 points in his second of three runs to win the Burton U.S. Open for a second straight year and seventh time overall.

He came from behind to beat Australian Scotty James, who had the highest-scoring first run with 82.87 points. James beat White at both the Winter X Games in January and the PyeongChang Olympic test event in February.

“I needed those to make it today,” White said of the defeats, which included an 11th-place finish at X Games, his worst since his debut in 2000 at 13 years old. “I needed that motivation and frustration of losing.”

White said it was his last contest of the season. White had an up-and-down campaign, but it was his busiest since the Sochi Olympics. In addition to the X Games and Olympic test event defeats, and an 18th-place finish at his season opener in December, he won the U.S. Grand Prix at Mammoth Mountain, Calif., in February.

On Saturday, White landed a cab double cork 1440 — or YOLO Flip — followed by his signature double McTwist 1260 in the same run for the first time in his career, according to The Associated Press.

“Come next season, I’m going to be a completely different rider,” White told reporter Tina Dixon on the U.S. Open live stream. “On another level, hopefully. It’s so funny because I keep hearing from people about this [2018] Olympics and whatnot. I’m already thinking about China [the 2022 Beijing Winter Games]. I’m going to keep going.”

Chase Josey, emerging as a favorite for one of four U.S. Olympic team spots, was third on Saturday. Sochi Olympic champion Iouri Podladtchikov was fourth, and 2014 and 2015 Winter X Games champion Danny Davis was sixth.

Japan Olympic silver medalist Ayumu Hirano was taken to a hospital for further evaluation after a fall in his second run, Dixon reported.

Chloe Kim won the women’s final after three-time Olympic medalist Kelly Clark pulled out for precautionary reasons following a warm-up crash.

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MORE: 18 U.S. Olympic hopefuls to watch for PyeongChang 2018

Noah Lyles a must-see in Paris; Diamond League TV, live stream schedule

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The last time Noah Lyles raced a Diamond League 200m, he became the fourth-fastest man in history. His follow-up comes against a field of similar strength in Paris on Saturday

Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA airs live coverage from 2-4 p.m. ET. NBC Sports Gold streams live coverage starting at noon.

Lyles could look to improve on the 19.50 he ran in Lausanne on July 5, when he moved to No. 4 on the all-time list behind Usain BoltYohan Blake and Michael Johnson. There’s reason to believe he can, given the Swiss race was into a slight headwind.

And because most of the major players from Lausanne are back for Paris. That includes Turkey’s Ramil Guliyev, who won the 2017 World title while Lyles was out injured.

Two more notables — Olympic bronze medalist Christophe Lemaitre of France and Nigeria’s Divine Oduduru, the third-fastest man this year — are in Saturday’s field after missing the July event.

Lyles may also be looking at Paris as a lead-up to the two biggest international meets of the year — a Diamond League final in Brussels on Sept. 6 and the world championships in Doha three weeks later.

Here are the Paris entry lists. Here’s the schedule of events (all times Eastern):

12:02 p.m. — Men’s Shot Put
12:35 — Women’s Triple Jump
1:17 — Women’s Discus
1:40 — Women’s Pole Vault
2:03 — Men’s 400m Hurdles
2:09 — Men’s High Jump
2:14 — Men’s 800m
2:24 — Women’s 100m
2:32 — Men’s Triple Jump
2:35 — Men’s 1500m
2:48 — Women’s 400m
2:57 — Men’s 200m
3:06 — Women’s 800m
3:29 — Men’s 3000m Steeplechase
3:50 — Men’s 110m Hurdles

Here are five events to watch:

Women’s Pole Vault — 1:40 p.m. ET
All six women who have cleared 4.80 meters this season are here, topped by world leader and London Olympic champion Jenn Suhr. But Suhr hasn’t won a top-level meet outside the U.S. since 2012. Watch out for Rio Olympic and world champ Katerina Stefanidi, the Greek who beat Suhr in Birmingham, Great Britain, last Sunday. And Olympic and world silver medalist Sandi Morris at her first Diamond League in two months.

Women’s 100m — 2:24 p.m. ET
Olympic champ Elaine Thompson takes her No. 1 world ranking into her first Diamond League 100m in two and a half months. Thompson rebounded from a blemished 2018 to win June’s Jamaican Championships in 10.73 seconds, cementing herself as the world championships favorite. Three other women in this field have a personal best in the 10.8s, including 2018 U.S. champion Aleia HobbsTeahna Daniels, the surprise 2019 U.S. champ, is coming off a third-place, 11.24 finish in Birmingham against a largely unaccomplished field.

Men’s Triple Jump — 2:32 p.m. ET
Americans Christian Taylor and Will Claye go head-to-head for the 48th time in this event, according to Tilastopaja.org. Taylor, who owns five combined Olympic and world titles, has a 25-22 edge and hasn’t lost to his countryman on the Diamond League level in five years. But Claye, who owns five combined Olympic and world medals (but no gold), ranks No. 1 in the world this year with his personal-best 18.14-meter mark from June 29. The winner here is likely the favorite for worlds.

Men’s 200m — 2:57 p.m. ET
Lyles has never lost to anyone in this field in senior competition. In fact, only one man has beaten him in a 200m in the last three years, countryman Michael Norman, who is focusing on the 400m this summer. Last year, Lyles made a statement by breaking 19.8 in the 200m on four separate occasions, something only Usain Bolt had previously done. Lyles is at three sub-19.8s so far this season with at least three meets left.

Men’s 110m Hurdles — 3:50 p.m. ET
Grant Holloway
, the only man to break 13 seconds this year, makes his Diamond League debut after turning professional following his junior season at Florida. He takes on the second- and third-fastest men this year, including former NCAA rival Daniel Roberts, who upset Holloway at the USATF Outdoor Championships.

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MORE: David Rudisha to miss world championships

2019 U.S. Open Women’s Draw

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Serena Williams‘ big showdown at the 2018 U.S. Open came in a controversial final with Naomi Osaka. This year, her most anticipated match may be her first-round date with Maria Sharapova.

It’s one of potentially two first-week blockbusters. Osaka, the world No. 1 and defending champion, will play 15-year-old American phenom Coco Gauff in the third round should each win her first two matches.

Williams comes to New York in her seventh bid to win a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles title. She was runner-up at three of her last five Slams and is two years removed from life-threatening childbirth.

Sharapova, who like Williams has dealt with recent injuries, has seen her ranking fall to 87th. She has lost 18 straight matches to Williams but advanced from what would have been their last meeting when Williams withdrew injured minutes before a 2018 French Open fourth-round date.

Osaka has traded the No. 1 ranking with Australian Ash Barty this spring and summer. The Japanese megastar was bounced in the first week of the last two majors and withdrew from her last U.S. Open tune-up event with a knee injury.

Gauff, who qualified into Wimbledon and then became the youngest woman to reach the fourth round since Jennifer Capriati in 1991, is playing her first U.S. Open main draw. She won the junior title.

US OPEN DRAWS: Men | Women

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