NBC coverage of PyeongChang Winter Olympics live across all time zones

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NBC will broadcast its Winter Olympic TV programming live across all time zones for the first time at the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Games.

This includes daytime, primetime and late-night coverage on NBC, as first reported by the Los Angeles Times.

On most nights, primetime coverage will begin at 8 p.m. ET, 7 p.m. CT, 6 p.m. MT and 5 p.m. PT.

“Nothing brings America together for two weeks like the Olympics, and that communal experience will now be shared across the country at the same time both on television and streaming online,” said Jim Bell, President, NBC Olympics Production & Programming. “That means social media won’t be ahead of the action in any time zone, and as a result, none of our viewers will have to wait for anything. This is exciting news for the audience, the advertisers, and our affiliates alike.”

Primetime coverage will be followed in all time zones by local news and then a “Primetime Plus” program with live continuing PyeongChang Olympic coverage.

A primetime replay will follow “Primetime Plus.”

The PyeongChang Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony is Feb. 9. Competition starts Feb. 8.

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MORE: PyeongChang Winter Olympics daily schedule highlights

Kenya’s Olympic track coach banned 10 years

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The Kenyan track team coach who was sent home from the Rio Olympics was banned for 10 years Wednesday for seeking a bribe of $12,000 to help athletes beat doping tests.

Michael Rotich was banned by the IAAF ethics board following a three-year investigation prompted by an undercover sting by British newspaper The Sunday Times. He was also ordered to pay a $5,000 fine and $14,000 in procedural costs.

In video footage released by the newspaper during the Rio Games, Rotich asked undercover reporters for the money to help a group of British runners dope with EPO and get away with it in the region in Kenya where he was the senior track official. To do that, he would give them advance notice of any drug tests.

“When I have interest, I will be able to find ways and means of doing that,” Rotich told the reporters.

The undercover reporters were posing as the coach and manager of a fictional group of athletes and no doping took place.

But the video was released following a series of Kenyan doping and corruption scandals involving high-profile athletes and senior officials.

Rotich was filmed alongside another Kenyan, a man identified as Joseph Mwangi, who said he could provide the banned blood-boosting substance EPO to the athletes once they were in Kenya.

Three videos were recorded of Rotich meeting the undercover reporters in January and February 2016.

In them, Rotich said he could use his influence in the famous high-altitude training region in Kenya’s Rift Valley to find out if and when doping control officers were planning to test the visiting British athletes.

Rotich told the undercover reporters that he knew the local drug testers and would say to them: “I am in charge of the region. Would you mind from time to time let me know if you are coming to test our own athletes or international athletes?”

Rotich said he was confident the testers would comply and he could give the British athletes 12 hours’ notice of any tests, allowing them to try to flush any banned substances out of their systems. Out-of-competition doping tests are meant to surprise athletes so they can’t take any action to avoid detection.

In his IAAF case, Rotich claimed he was only gathering information on corruption to take to authorities. That defense was rejected by the three-member ethics panel.

Although Rotich’s actions didn’t lead to any doping or cover-ups, the presence of advance notice of tests in Kenya came under more scrutiny in the case of 2008 Olympic 1500m champion Asbel Kiprop.

Kiprop admitted that he had been given advance notice of a doping test in Kenya in late 2017. Kiprop also admitted paying the doping control officer a small amount of money, which he suggested was common in Kenya. Kiprop tested positive for EPO and was banned four years.

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Ruta Meilutyte, shock Olympic swimming champion, retires at age 22

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Ruta Meilutyte has retired from swimming at age 22, seven years after becoming the youngest Olympic champion this millennium as the surprise winner of the 100m breaststroke in London.

Meilutyte said she wants to focus on her studies, according to the Lithuanian Swimming Federation. The news comes two weeks after the federation revealed that Meilutyte was facing a ban of up to two years for missing three drug tests between April 2018 and this March.

The federation reported on Sunday that Meilutyte took full responsibility for the missed tests, having failed to update drug testers on her whereabouts.

Meilutyte, who has a clean drug-testing record, last competed in December. She informed the federation of her retirement Tuesday, according to the release.

Meilutyte stunned at the London Games, where she dropped 1.74 seconds off her personal best in the 100m breast prelims, clocking the fastest time of the field. She went even faster in the semifinals and final, upsetting American favorite Rebecca Soni, who had the eight fastest times in the world in 2011.

Meilutyte followed that with gold and silver at the 2013 and 2015 Worlds before dropping to seventh at the Rio Games. She held the 100m breast world record for four years before American Lilly King reset it in 2017.

Meilutyte ranked seventh in the world last year, when she revealed she had suffered depression since 2016, according to O Globo.

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